WorldCat Identities

Goldberg, Linda S.

Overview
Works: 70 works in 297 publications in 1 language and 3,489 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other, Creator
Classifications: HB1, 337
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Linda S Goldberg
Topics in empirical international economics : a festschrift in honor of Robert E. Lipsey by Magnus Blomström( Book )

17 editions published between 2001 and 2009 in English and held by 311 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The next section features articles on international trade, including such significant issues as deterring child labour exploitation in developing countries, exchange rate regimes, and mapping US comparative advantage across various factors. The book concludes with research on multinational corporations and includes a discussion of the long-debated issue of whether growth of production abroad substitutes for or is complementary to production growth at home. The papers in the volume are dedicated to Robert E. Lipsey, who, for more than a half century at the NBER contributed significantly to the broad field of empirical international economics
Obstacles to trade and competition by Janusz A Ordover( Book )

5 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 272 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Employment versus wage adjustment and the U.S. dollar by José Campa( Book )

23 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 150 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using two decades of annual data, we explore the links between real exchange rates and employment, wages and overtime activity in specific U.S. manufacturing industries. Across two-digit industry levels of aggregation, exchange rate movements do not have large effects on numbers of jobs or on hours worked. More substantial effects are picked up in industry wages, especially for industries characterized by low price-over-cost markup ratios, and in overtime wages and overtime employment. The industry-by-industry pattern of wage responsiveness is not strongly related to industry export orientation or changes in overall external orientation. Industries with low price-over-cost markups and those with a less skilled workforce exhibit relatively larger employment elasticities but lower wage elasticities
The international role of the dollar and trade balance adjustment by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

13 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 76 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: The pattern of international trade adjustment is affected by the continuing international role of the dollar and related evidence on exchange rate pass-through into prices. This paper argues that a depreciation of the dollar would have asymmetric effects on flows between the United States and its trading partners. With low exchange rate pass-through to U.S. import prices and high exchange rate pass-through to the local prices of countries consuming U.S. exports, the effect of dollar depreciation on real trade flows is dominated by an adjustment in U.S. export quantities, which increase as U.S. goods become cheaper in the rest of the world. Real U.S. imports are affected less because U.S. prices are more insulated from exchange rate movements pass-through is low and dollar invoicing is high. In relation to prices, the effects on the U.S. terms of trade are limited: U.S. exporters earn the same amount of dollars for each unit shipped abroad, and U.S. consumers do not encounter more expensive imports. Movements in dollar exchange rates also affect the international trade transactions of countries invoicing some of their trade in dollars, even when these countries are not transacting directly with the United States
Exchange rates and local labor markets by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

10 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: We document the consequences of real exchange rate movements for the employment, hours, and hourly earnings of workers in manufacturing industries across individual states. Exchange rates have statistically significant wage and employment implications in these local labor markets. The importance and size of these dollar-induced effects vary considerably across industries and are more pronounced in some U.S. regions. In addition to the importance of exchange rate shocks, we confirm prior research results showing that relatively strong local conditions drive up wage in local industries, while anticipated future (positive) local shocks reduce current wages
Exchange-rate pass-through to import prices in the euro area by José Campa( Book )

26 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This paper presents an empirical analysis of transmission rates from exchange rate movements to import prices, across countries and product categories, in the euro area over the last fifteen years. Our results show that the transmission of exchange rate changes to import prices in the short run is high, although incomplete, and that it differs across industries and countries; in the long run, exchange rate pass-through is higher and close to 1. We do not find compelling evidence that the introduction of the euro caused a structural change in exchange rate pass-through. Although some estimated point elasticities have declined, structural breaks in exchange rate pass-through into import prices are evident only in a limited sample of manufacturing industries. And since the euro was introduced, industries producing differentiated goods have been more likely to experience reduced rates of exchange rate pass-through to import prices. Exchange rate changes continue to lead to large changes in import prices across euro-area countries"--Federal Reserve Bank of New York web site
When is U.S. bank lending to emerging markets volatile? by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

18 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 56 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Using bank-specific data on U.S. bank claims on individual foreign countries since the mid-1980s, this paper (1) characterizes the size and portfolio diversification patterns of the U.S. banks engaging in foreign lending, and (2) econometrically explores the determinants of fluctuations in U.S. bank claims on a broad set of countries. U.S. bank claims on Latin American and Asian emerging markets, and on industrialized countries, are sensitive to U.S. macroeconomic conditions. When the United States grows rapidly, there is substitution between claims on industrialized countries and claims on the United States. The pattern of response of claims on emerging markets to U.S. conditions differs across banks of different sizes and across emerging market regions. Moreover, we find that, unlike U.S. bank claims on industrialized countries, claims on emerging markets are not highly sensitive to local country GDP and interest rates"--Federal Reserve Bank of New York web site
Vehicle currency use in international trade by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

13 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although currency invoicing in international trade transactions is central to the transmission of monetary policy, the forces motivating the choice of currency have long been debated. We introduce a model wherein agents involved in international trade can invoice in the exporter's currency, the importer's currency, or a third-country vehicle currency. The model is designed to contrast the contribution of macroeconomic variability with that of industry-specific features in the selection of an invoice currency. We show that producers in industries with high demand elasticities are more likely than producers in other industries to display herding in their choice of currency. This industry-related force is more influential than local macroeconomic performance in determining producers' choices. Drawing on data on invoice currency use in exports and imports for twenty-four countries, we document that the dollar is the currency of choice for most transactions involving the United States. The dollar is also extensively used as a vehicle currency in international trade flows that do not directly involve the United States. Consistent with the results of our model, this last finding is largely attributable to international trade in reference-priced and organized-exchange traded goods. Although the magnitude of business-cycle volatility matters for invoicing of more differentiated products, it is less central for invoicing nondifferentiated goods
Study guide to accompany Krugman/Obstfeld International economics, theory and policy, fourth edition by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

9 editions published in 1997 in English and Undetermined and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The international exposure of U.S. banks by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

11 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper documents the changing international exposures of U.S. bank balance sheets since the mid-1980s. U.S. banks have foreign positions heavily concentrated in Europe, with more volatile flows to other regions of the world. In recent years some cross-border claims on Latin American countries have declined, while claims extended locally by the branches and subsidiaries of U.S. banks have grown. The foreign exposures of larger U.S. banks tend to be less volatile than claims of smaller banks, and locally-issued claims tend to be more stable than cross-border flows. Business cycle variables have mixed influence on U.S. bank cross-border and local claims. The cross-border claims of U.S. banks on European customers tend to be procyclical. By contrast, locally generated and cross border claims on Latin American customers of U.S. banks are not robustly related to either U.S. or country-specific business cycle variables. U.S. banks do not appear to be strong conduits for transmitting U.S. cycles to these smaller markets, and may instead serve a positive role in stabilizing the amplitude of foreign country cycles
Trade invoicing in the accession countries : are they suited to the euro? by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

6 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The accession countries to the euro area are increasingly binding their economic activity, external and internal, to the euro area countries. One aspect of this phenomenon concerns the currency invoicing of international trade transactions, where accession countries have reduced their use of the US dollar in invoicing international trade transactions. Theory predicts that the optimal invoicing choices for accession countries depend on the composition of goods in exports and imports and on the macroeconomic fluctuations of trade partners, both bearing on the role of herding and hedging considerations within exporter profitability. These considerations yield country-specific estimates about the degree of euro-denominated invoicing of exports. I find that the exporters of some accession countries, even in their trade transactions with the euro zone and other European Union countries, might be pricing too much of their trade in euros rather than in dollars, thus taking on excessive risk in international markets"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site
Establishing credibility : evolving perceptions of the European Central Bank by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

10 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The perceptions of a central bank's inflation aversion may reflect institutional structure or, more dynamically, the history of its policy decisions. In this paper, we present a novel empirical framework that uses high frequency data to test for persistent variation in market perceptions of central bank inflation aversion. The first years of the European Central Bank (ECB) provide a natural experiment for this model. Tests of the effect of news announcements on the slope of yield curves in the euro-area, and on the euro/dollar exchange rate, suggest that the market's perception of the policy stance of the ECB during its first six years of operation significantly evolved, with a belief in its inflation aversion increasing in the wake of its monetary tightening. In contrast, tests based on the response of the slope of the United States yield curve to news offer no comparable evidence of any change in market perceptions of the inflation aversion of the Federal Reserve
Banking globalization, monetary transmission and the lending channel by Nicola Cetorelli( Book )

11 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The globalization of banking in the United States is influencing the monetary transmission mechanism both domestically and in foreign markets. Using quarterly information from all U.S. banks filing call reports between 1980 and 2005, we find evidence for the lending channel for monetary policy in large banks, but only those banks that are domestically-oriented and without international operations. We show that the large globally-oriented banks rely on internal capital markets with their foreign affiliates to help smooth domestic liquidity shocks. We also show that the existence of such internal capital markets contributes to an international propagation of domestic liquidity shocks to lending by affiliated banks abroad. While these results imply a substantially more active lending channel than documented in the seminal work of Kashyap and Stein (2000), the lending channel within the United States is declining in strength as banking becomes more globalized
Macroeconomic interdependence and the international role of the dollar by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

13 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. dollar holds a dominant place in the invoicing of international trade, along two complementary dimensions. First, most U.S. exports and imports invoiced in dollars. Second, trade flows that do not involve the United States are also substantially invoiced in dollars, an aspect that has received relatively little attention. Using a simple center-periphery model, we show that the second dimension magnifies the exposure of periphery countries to the center's monetary policy, even when direct trade flows between the center and the periphery are limited. When intra-periphery trade volumes are sensitive to the center's monetary policy, the model predicts substantial welfare gains from coordinated monetary policy. Our model also shows that even though exchange rate movements are not fully efficient, flexible exchange rates are a central component of optimal policy
Distribution margins, imported inputs, and the sensitivity of the CPI to exchange rates by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Border prices of traded goods are highly sensitive to exchange rates, but the CPI, and the retail prices of these goods, are more stable. Our paper decomposes the sources of this stability for twenty-one OECD countries, focusing on the important roles of distribution margins and imported inputs in transmitting exchange rate fluctuations into consumption prices. We provide rich cross-country and cross-industry details on distribution margins and their sensitivity to exchange rates, imported inputs used in different categories of consumption goods, and weights in consumption of nontradables, home tradables and imported goods. While distribution margins damp the sensitivity of consumption prices of tradable goods to exchange rates, they also lead to enhanced pass through when nontraded goods prices are sensitive to exchange rates. Such price sensitivity arises because imported inputs are used in production of home nontradables. Calibration exercises show that, at under 5 percent, the United States has the lowest expected CPI sensitivity to exchange rates of all countries examined. On average, calibrated exchange rate pass through into CPIs is expected to be closer to 15 percent
Pass through of exchange rates to consumption prices : what has changed and why? by José Campa( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this paper, we use cross-county and time series evidence to argue that retail price sensitivity to exchange rates may have increased over the past decade. This finding applies to traded goods, as well as to non-traded goods. We highlight three reasons for changing pass through at the level of retail prices of goods. First, pass through may have declined at the level of import prices, but the evidence is mixed over types of goods and countries. Second, there has been a large expansion of imported input use across sectors. This means that the costs of imported goods as well as home tradable goods have heightened sensitivity to import prices and exchange rates. The final channel we consider is whether there have been changing sectoral expenditures on distribution services, with the direction of change negatively correlated with pass through into final consumption prices. We find that this channel, which has been a means of insulating consumption prices from import content and exchange rates, has not systematically changed in recent years. The balance of effects weighs in favor of increased sensitivity of consumption prices to exchange rates, even if exchange-rate pass-through into import prices has declined for some types of goods
A bargaining theory of trade invoicing and pricing by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

13 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We develop a theoretical model of international trade pricing in which individual exporters and importers bargain over the transaction price and exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. We find that the choice of price and invoicing currency reflects the full market structure, including the extent of fragmentation and the degree of heterogeneity across importers and across exporters. Our study shows that a party has a higher effective bargaining weight when it is large or more risk tolerant. A higher effective bargaining weight of importers relative to exporters in turn translates into lower import prices and greater exchange rate pass-through into import prices. We show the range of price and invoicing outcomes that arise under alternative market structures. Such structures matter not only for the outcome of specific exporter-importer transactions, but also for aggregate variables such as the average price, the average choice of invoicing currency, and the correlation between invoicing currency and the size of trade transactions. -- currency ; invoicing ; exchange rate
Micro, macro, and strategic forces in international trade invoicing by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

4 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The use of different currencies in the invoicing of international trade transactions plays a major role in the international transmission of economic fluctuations. Existing studies argue that an exporter's invoicing choice reflects structural aspects of her industry, such as market share and the price-sensitivity of demand, the hedging of marginal costs, due for instance to the use of imported inputs, and macroeconomic volatility. We use a new highly disaggregated dataset to assess the roles of the various invoicing determinants. We find support for the factors identified in the literature, and document a new feature, in the form of a link between shipments size and invoicing. Specifically, larger transactions are more likely to be invoiced in the importer's currency. We offer a potential theoretical explanation for the empirical link between transaction size and invoicing by allowing invoicing to be set through a bargaining between exporters and importers, a feature that is absent from existing models despite its empirical relevance
Central bank dollar swap lines and overseas dollar funding costs by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

4 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Following a scarcity of dollar funding available internationally to banks and financial institutions, starting in December 2007 the Federal Reserve established or expanded Temporary Reciprocal Currency Arrangements with fourteen foreign central banks. These central banks had the capacity to use these swap facilities to provide dollar liquidity to institutions in their jurisdictions. This paper presents the developments in the dollar swap facilities through the end of 2009. The facilities were a response to dollar funding shortages outside the United States during a period of market dysfunction. Formal research, as well as more descriptive accounts, suggests that the dollar swap lines among central banks were effective at reducing the dollar funding pressures abroad and stresses in money markets. The central bank dollar swap facilities are an important part of a toolbox for dealing with systemic liquidity disruptions
Global banks and international shock transmission : evidence from the crisis by Nicola Cetorelli( Book )

9 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Global banks played a significant role in the transmission of the 2007 to 2009 crisis to emerging market economies. We examine the relationships between adverse liquidity shocks on main developed-country banking systems to emerging markets across Europe, Asia, and Latin America, isolating loan supply from loan demand effects. Loan supply in emerging markets was significantly affected through three separate channels: a contraction in direct, cross-border lending by foreign banks; a contraction in local lending by foreign banks' affiliates in emerging markets; and a contraction in loan supply by domestic banks resulting from the funding shock to their balance sheet induced by the decline in interbank, cross-border lending. Policy interventions, such as the Vienna Initiative introduced in Europe, influenced the lending channel effects on emerging markets of head office balance sheet shocks
 
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Topics in empirical international economics : a festschrift in honor of Robert E. Lipsey
Alternative Names
Goldberg, L.

Goldberg, Linda

Goldberg, Linda (Linda S.)

Languages
English (219)

Covers
Study guide to accompany Krugman/Obstfeld International economics, theory and policy, fourth edition