WorldCat Identities

Goldberg, Linda S.

Overview
Works: 43 works in 112 publications in 1 language and 710 library holdings
Roles: Author, Creator
Classifications: HB1, 332.450973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Linda S Goldberg
Obstacles to trade and competition by Janusz A Ordover( Book )
6 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 273 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The international role of the dollar and trade balance adjustment by Linda S Goldberg( Book )
13 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 101 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The pattern of international trade adjustment is affected by the continuing international role of the dollar and related evidence on exchange rate pass-through into prices. This paper argues that a depreciation of the dollar would have asymmetric effects on flows between the United States and its trading partners. With low exchange rate pass-through to U.S. import prices and high exchange rate pass-through to the local prices of countries consuming U.S. exports, the effect of dollar depreciation on real trade flows is dominated by an adjustment in U.S. export quantities, which increase as U.S. goods become cheaper in the rest of the world. Real U.S. imports are affected less because U.S. prices are more insulated from exchange rate movements -- pass-through is low and dollar invoicing is high. In relation to prices, the effects on the U.S. terms of trade are limited: U.S. exporters earn the same amount of dollars for each unit shipped abroad, and U.S. consumers do not encounter more expensive imports. Movements in dollar exchange rates also affect the international trade transactions of countries invoicing some of their trade in dollars, even when these countries are not transacting directly with the United States
When is U.S. bank lending to emerging markets volatile? by Linda S Goldberg( Book )
16 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 81 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstract: Using bank-specific data on U.S. bank claims on individual foreign countries since the mid-1980s, this paper: 1) characterizes the size and portfolio diversification patterns of the U.S. banks engaging in foreign lending; and 2) econometrically explores the determinants of fluctuations in U.S. bank claims on a broad set of countries. U.S. bank claims on Latin American and Asian emerging markets, and on industrialized countries, are sensitive to U.S. macroeconomic conditions. When the United States grows rapidly, there is substitution between claims on industrialized countries and claims on the United States. The pattern of response of claims on emerging markets to U.S. conditions differs across banks of different sizes and across emerging market regions. Moreover, unlike U.S. bank claims on industrialized countries, we find that claims on emerging markets are not highly sensitive to local country GDP and interest rates
Vehicle currency use in international trade by Linda S Goldberg( )
12 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Although currency invoicing in international trade transactions is central to the transmission of monetary policy, the forces motivating the choice of currency have long been debated. We introduce a model wherein agents involved in international trade can invoice in the exporter's currency, the importer's currency, or a third-country vehicle currency. The model is designed to contrast the contribution of macroeconomic variability with that of industry-specific features in the selection of an invoice currency. We show that producers in industries with high demand elasticities are more likely than producers in other industries to display herding in their choice of currency. This industry-related force is more influential than local macroeconomic performance in determining producers' choices. Drawing on data on invoice currency use in exports and imports for twenty-four countries, we document that the dollar is the currency of choice for most transactions involving the United States. The dollar is also extensively used as a vehicle currency in international trade flows that do not directly involve the United States. Consistent with the results of our model, this last finding is largely attributable to international trade in reference-priced goods and goods traded on organized exchanges. Although the magnitude of business cycle volatility matters for invoicing of more differentiated products, it is less central for invoicing nondifferentiated goods"--Federal Reserve Bank of New York web site
Trade invoicing in the accession countries : are they suited to the euro? by Linda S Goldberg( )
10 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 64 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The accession countries to the euro area are increasingly binding their economic activity, external and internal, to the euro area countries. One aspect of this phenomenon concerns the currency invoicing of international trade transactions, where accession countries have reduced their use of the US dollar in invoicing international trade transactions. Theory predicts that the optimal invoicing choices for accession countries depend on the composition of goods in exports and imports and on the macroeconomic fluctuations of trade partners, both bearing on the role of herding and hedging considerations within exporter profitability. These considerations yield country-specific estimates about the degree of euro-denominated invoicing of exports. I find that the exporters of some accession countries, even in their trade transactions with the euro zone and other European Union countries, might be pricing too much of their trade in euros rather than in dollars, thus taking on excessive risk in international markets"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site
Banking globalization, monetary transmission, and the lending channel by Nicola Cetorelli( )
10 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 56 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The globalization of banking in the United States is influencing the monetary transmission mechanism both domestically and in foreign markets. Using quarterly information from all U.S. banks filing call reports between 1980 and 2005, we find evidence for the lending channel for monetary policy in large banks, but only those banks that are domestically-oriented and without international operations. We show that the large globally-oriented banks rely on internal capital markets with their foreign affiliates to help smooth domestic liquidity shocks. We also show that the existence of such internal capital markets contributes to an international propagation of domestic liquidity shocks to lending by affiliated banks abroad. While these results imply a substantially more active lending channel than documented in the seminal work of Kashyap and Stein (2000), the lending channel within the United States is declining in strength as banking becomes more globalized
Exchange rate pass-through into import prices : a macro or micro phenomenon? by José Campa( Book )
3 editions published between 2002 and 2004 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Exchange rate regime optimality, as well as monetary policy effectiveness, depends on the tightness of the link between exchange rate movements and import prices. Recent debates hinge on whether producer-currency-pricing (PCP) or local currency pricing (LCP) of imports is more prevalent, and on whether exchange rate pass-through rates are endogenous to a country's macroeconomic conditions. We provide cross-country and time series evidence on both of these issues for the imports of twenty-five OECD countries. Across the OECD and especially within manufacturing industries, there is compelling evidence of partial pass-through in the short-run-- rejecting both PCP and LCP. Over the long run, PCP is more prevalent for many types of imported goods. Higher inflation and exchange rate volatility are weakly associated with higher pass-through of exchange rates into import prices. However, for OECD countries, the most important determinants of changes in pass-through over time are microeconomic and relate to the industry composition of a country's import bundle"--Federal Reserve Bank of New York web site
Foreign direct investment, trade and real exchange rate linkages in Southeast Asia and Latin America by Linda S Goldberg( Book )
1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
We investigate the relationships among trade, foreign direct investment and the real exchange rate between a set of Southeast Asian and Latin American countries and both the United States and Japan. Foreign direct investment by both Japan and the United States to the Southeast Asian countries in our sample is significantly affected by bilateral real exchange rates. Also, trade between the countries in our sample and the United States and Japan is significantly affected by foreign direct investment. These sets of relationships, between the real exchange rate and foreign direct investment, and between foreign direct investment and trade, support two channels through which the real exchange rate affects trade: a direct effect on the relative price of goods and an indirect effect through foreign direct investment
Exchange rates and local labor markets by Linda Goldberg( Book )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstract: We document the consequences of real exchange rate movements for the employment, hours, and hourly earnings of workers in manufacturing industries across individual states. Exchange rates have statistically significant wage and employment implications in these local labor markets. The importance and size of these dollar-induced effects vary considerably across industries and are more pronounced in some U.S. regions. In addition to the importance of exchange rate shocks, we confirm prior research results showing that relatively strong local conditions drive up wage in local industries, while anticipated future (positive) local shocks reduce current wages
International trade and factor mobility : an empirical investigation by Linda S Goldberg( Book )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstract: Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) has been growing rapidly, at a pace far exceeding the growth in international trade. Thus, a full understanding of the relationship between trade in goods and FDI is important for obtaining a complete picture of the extent and sources of international linkages. We investigate whether FDI serves as a complement to trade or a substitute for trade based on the effects identified by the Rybczynski theorem whereby an increase in a factor of production used intensively in one sector affects production both in that sector and in other sectors. Using detailed data on bilateral capital and trade flows between the United States and individual Latin American countries, we examine the linkages between FDI into particular sectors of Latin American economies and the net exports of those and other manufacturing sectors. We find that FDI from the United States can lead to significant, and varied, shifts in the composition of activity in many Latin American countries and across many manufacturing industries
A fresh face for Samuel Gompers methyl cellulose poultice cleaning by Linda S Goldberg( )
1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Exchange rates and wages by Linda Goldberg( Book )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstract: The effects of exchange rate fluctuations across the population is an important issue for increasingly globalized economies. Previous studies using industry aggregate data have found differences across industries in the labor market implications of exchange rates, reporting that industry wages are significantly more responsive than industry employment. We offer an explanation for this paradoxical finding. Using Current Population Survey data for 1976 through 1998, we document that the main mechanism for exchange rate effects on wages occurs through job turnover and the strong consequences this has for the wages of workers undergoing such job transitions. By contrast, workers who remain with the same employer experience little if any wage impacts from exchange rate shocks. In addition, we find that the least educated workers who also have the most frequent job changes shoulder the largest adjustments to exchange rates
Banking globalization, monetary transmission and the lending channel ( )
2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The globalization of banking in the United States is influencing the monetary transmission mechanism both domestically and in foreign markets. Using quarterly information from all U.S. banks filing call reports between 1980 and 2005, we find evidence for the lending channel for monetary policy in large banks, but only those banks that are domestically-oriented and without international operations. We show that the large globally-oriented banks rely on internal capital markets with their foreign affiliates to help smooth domestic liquidity shocks. We also show that the existence of such internal capital markets contributes to an international propagation of domestic liquidity shocks to lending by affiliated banks abroad. While these results imply a substantially more active lending channel than documented in the seminal work of Kashyap and Stein(2000), the lending channel within the United States is declining in strength as banking becomes more globalized. -- Lending channel ; Bank ; global ; liquidity ; transmission ; internal capital market
Central bank dollar swap lines and overseas dollar funding costs by Linda S Goldberg( )
2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Following a scarcity of dollar funding available internationally to banks and financial institutions, in December 2007 the Federal Reserve began to establish or expand Temporary Reciprocal Currency Arrangements with fourteen foreign central banks. These central banks had the capacity to use these swap facilities to provide dollar liquidity to institutions in their jurisdictions. This paper presents the developments in the dollar swap facilities through the end of 2009. The facilities were a response to dollar funding shortages outside the United States during a period of market dysfunction. Formal research, as well as more descriptive accounts, suggests that the dollar swap lines among central banks were effective at reducing the dollar funding pressures abroad and stresses in money markets. The central bank dollar swap facilities are an important part of the toolbox for dealing with systemic liquidity disruptions. -- Banks ; foreign exchange ; swap ; reciprocal currency arrangement ; liquidity ; dollar
Global banks and international shock transmission evidence from the crisis by Nicola Cetorelli( )
2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Global banks played a significant role in transmitting the 2007-09 financial crisis to emerging-market economies. We examine adverse liquidity shocks on main developedcountry banking systems and their relationships to emerging markets across Europe, Asia, and Latin America, isolating loan supply from loan demand effects. Loan supply in emerging markets across Europe, Asia, and Latin America was affected significantly through three separate channels: 1) a contraction in direct, cross-border lending by foreign banks; 2) a contraction in local lending by foreign banks' affiliates in emerging markets; and 3) a contraction in loan supply by domestic banks, resulting from the funding shock to their balance sheets induced by the decline in interbank, cross-border lending. Policy interventions, such as the Vienna Initiative introduced in Europe, influenced the lendingchannel effects on emerging markets of shocks to head-office balance sheets. -- Bank ; global ; liquidity ; transmission ; capital markets ; cross-border lending ; emerging market
Liquidity management of U.S. global banks internal capital markets in the great recession by Nicola Cetorelli( )
2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The recent crisis highlighted the importance of globally active banks in linking markets. One channel for this linkage is the liquidity management of these banks, specifically the regular flow of funds between parent banks and their affiliates in diverse foreign markets. We use the Great Recession as an opportunity to identify the balance-sheet shocks to parent banks in the United States and then explore which features of foreign affiliates are associated with protecting, for example, their status as important locations in sourcing funding or as destinations for foreign investment activity. We show that distance from the parent organization plays a significant role in this allocation, where distance is bankaffiliate specific and depends on the location's ex ante relative importance in local funding pools and overall foreign investment strategies. These flows are a form of global interdependence previously unexplored in the literature on international shock transmission. -- bank ; global ; liquidity ; transmission ; capital markets ; crisis ; contagion
Study guide to accompany Krugman, Obstfeld, Melitz International economics, theory & policy, ninth edition by Linda S Goldberg( Book )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Follow the money quantifying domestic effects of foreign bank shocks in the great recession by Nicola Cetorelli( )
2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Foreign banks pulled signifi cant funding from their U.S. branches during the Great Recession. We estimate that the average-sized branch experienced a 12 percent net internal fund "withdrawal," with the fund transfer disproportionately bigger for larger branches. This internal shock to the balance sheets of U.S. branches of foreign banks had sizable effects on their lending. On average, for each dollar of funds transferred internally to the parent, branches decreased lending supply by about forty to fifty cents. However, the extent of the lending effects was very different across branches, depending on their precrisis modes of operation in the United States. -- bank ; global ; liquidity ; transmission ; capital markets ; crisis ; branch
Distribution margins, imported inputs, and the sensitivity of the CPI to exchange rates by José Campa( Book )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstract: Border prices of traded goods are highly sensitive to exchange rates, but the CPI, and the retail prices of these goods, are more stable. Our paper decomposes the sources of this stability for twenty-one OECD countries, focusing on the important roles of distribution margins and imported inputs in transmitting exchange rate fluctuations into consumption prices. We provide rich cross-country and cross-industry details on distribution margins and their sensitivity to exchange rates, imported inputs used in different categories of consumption goods, and weights in consumption of nontradables, home tradables and imported goods. While distribution margins damp the sensitivity of consumption prices of tradable goods to exchange rates, they also lead to enhanced pass through when nontraded goods prices are sensitive to exchange rates. Such price sensitivity arises because imported inputs are used in production of home nontradables. Calibration exercises show that, at under 5 percent, the United States has the lowest expected CPI sensitivity to exchange rates of all countries examined. On average, calibrated exchange rate pass through into CPIs is expected to be closer to 15 percent
Micro, macro, and strategic forces in international trade invoicing by Linda S Goldberg( )
2 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The use of different currencies in the invoicing of international trade transactions plays a major role in the international transmission of economic fluctuations. Existing studies argue that an exporter's invoicing choice reflects structural aspects of her industry, such as market share and the price-sensitivity of demand, the hedging of marginal costs, due for instance to the use of imported inputs, and macroeconomic volatility. We use a new highly disaggregated dataset to assess the roles of the various invoicing determinants. We find support for the factors identified in the literature, and document a new feature, in the form of a link between shipments size and invoicing. Specifically, larger transactions are more likely to be invoiced in the importer's currency. We offer a potential theoretical explanation for the empirical link between transaction size and invoicing by allowing invoicing to be set through a bargaining between exporters and importers, a feature that is absent from existing models despite its empirical relevance
 
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Alternative Names
Goldberg, L.
Goldberg, Linda
Goldberg, Linda (Linda S.)
Languages
English (89)