WorldCat Identities

Goldberg, Linda S.

Overview
Works: 75 works in 522 publications in 1 language and 4,569 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other, Creator
Classifications: HB1, 337
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Linda S Goldberg
Topics in empirical international economics : a festschrift in honor of Robert E. Lipsey by Magnus Blomström( Book )

18 editions published between 2001 and 2009 in English and held by 308 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The next section features articles on international trade, including such significant issues as deterring child labour exploitation in developing countries, exchange rate regimes, and mapping US comparative advantage across various factors. The book concludes with research on multinational corporations and includes a discussion of the long-debated issue of whether growth of production abroad substitutes for or is complementary to production growth at home. The papers in the volume are dedicated to Robert E. Lipsey, who, for more than a half century at the NBER contributed significantly to the broad field of empirical international economics
Obstacles to trade and competition by Janusz A Ordover( Book )

8 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 282 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The international role of the dollar and trade balance adjustment by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

18 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 79 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: The pattern of international trade adjustment is affected by the continuing international role of the dollar and related evidence on exchange rate pass-through into prices. This paper argues that a depreciation of the dollar would have asymmetric effects on flows between the United States and its trading partners. With low exchange rate pass-through to U.S. import prices and high exchange rate pass-through to the local prices of countries consuming U.S. exports, the effect of dollar depreciation on real trade flows is dominated by an adjustment in U.S. export quantities, which increase as U.S. goods become cheaper in the rest of the world. Real U.S. imports are affected less because U.S. prices are more insulated from exchange rate movements pass-through is low and dollar invoicing is high. In relation to prices, the effects on the U.S. terms of trade are limited: U.S. exporters earn the same amount of dollars for each unit shipped abroad, and U.S. consumers do not encounter more expensive imports. Movements in dollar exchange rates also affect the international trade transactions of countries invoicing some of their trade in dollars, even when these countries are not transacting directly with the United States
Exchange rates and local labor markets by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

14 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 77 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We document the consequences of real exchange rate movements for the employment, hours, and hourly earnings of workers in manufacturing industries across individual states. Exchange rates have statistically significant wage and employment implications in these local labor markets. The importance and size of these dollar-induced effects vary considerably across industries and are more pronounced in some U.S. regions. In addition to the importance of exchange rate shocks, we confirm prior research results showing that relatively strong local conditions drive up wage in local industries, while anticipated future (positive) local shocks reduce current wages
Study guide to accompany Krugman/Obstfeld International economics, theory and policy, fourth edition by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

18 editions published between 1994 and 2009 in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Foreign direct investment, trade and real exchange rate linkages in Southeast Asia and Latin America by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

11 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 73 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We investigate the relationships among trade, foreign direct investment and the real exchange rate between a set of Southeast Asian and Latin American countries and both the United States and Japan. Foreign direct investment by both Japan and the United States to the Southeast Asian countries in our sample is significantly affected by bilateral real exchange rates. Also, trade between the countries in our sample and the United States and Japan is significantly affected by foreign direct investment. These sets of relationships, between the real exchange rate and foreign direct investment, and between foreign direct investment and trade, support two channels through which the real exchange rate affects trade: a direct effect on the relative price of goods and an indirect effect through foreign direct investment
Exchange rate pass-through into import prices : a macro or micro phenomenon? by José Campa( Book )

19 editions published between 2002 and 2004 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Exchange rate regime optimality, as well as monetary policy effectiveness, depends on the tightness of the link between exchange rate movements and import prices. Recent debates hinge on whether producer-currency-pricing (PCP) or local currency pricing (LCP) of imports is more prevalent, and on whether exchange rate pass-through rates are endogenous to a country's macroeconomic conditions. We provide cross-country and time series evidence on both of these issues for the imports of twenty-five OECD countries. Across the OECD and especially within manufacturing industries, there is compelling evidence of partial pass-through in the short-run-- rejecting both PCP and LCP. Over the long run, PCP is more prevalent for many types of imported goods. Higher inflation and exchange rate volatility are weakly associated with higher pass-through of exchange rates into import prices. However, for OECD countries, the most important determinants of changes in pass-through over time are microeconomic and relate to the industry composition of a country's import bundle"--Federal Reserve Bank of New York web site
International trade and factor mobility : an empirical investigation by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

13 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) has been growing rapidly, at a pace far exceeding the growth in international trade. Thus, a full understanding of the relationship between trade in goods and FDI is important for obtaining a complete picture of the extent and sources of international linkages. We investigate whether FDI serves as a complement to trade or a substitute for trade based on the effects identified by the Rybczynski theorem whereby an increase in a factor of production used intensively in one sector affects production both in that sector and in other sectors. Using detailed data on bilateral capital and trade flows between the United States and individual Latin American countries, we examine the linkages between FDI into particular sectors of Latin American economies and the net exports of those and other manufacturing sectors. We find that FDI from the United States can lead to significant, and varied, shifts in the composition of activity in many Latin American countries and across many manufacturing industries
Exchange-rate pass-through to import prices in the euro area by José Campa( Book )

26 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This paper presents an empirical analysis of transmission rates from exchange rate movements to import prices, across countries and product categories, in the euro area over the last fifteen years. Our results show that the transmission of exchange rate changes to import prices in the short run is high, although incomplete, and that it differs across industries and countries; in the long run, exchange rate pass-through is higher and close to one. We find no strong statistical evidence that the introduction of the euro caused a structural change in this transmission. Although estimated point elasticities seem to have declined since the introduction of the euro, we find little evidence of a structural break in the transmission of exchange rate movements except in the case of some manufacturing industries. And since the euro was introduced, industries producing differentiated goods have been more likely to experience reduced rates of exchange rate pass-through to import prices. Exchange rate changes continue to lead to large changes in import prices across euro-area countries"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site
Foreign and domestic bank participation in emerging markets : lessons from Mexico and Argentina by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

12 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Asian Crisis has highlighted the importance of strong domestic financial systems in overall economic development and stabilization. Less agreement is evident on the role of foreign banks in achieving this goal. We explore this issue by studying bank-specific data on lending by domestically- and foreign-owned banks in Argentina and Mexico. We find that foreign banks generally have had higher loan growth rates than their domestically-owned counterparts, with lower volatility of lending, contributing to lower overall volatility of credit. Additionally, in both countries, foreign banks show notable credit growth during crisis periods. In Argentina, the loan portfolios of foreign and domestic privately-owned banks are similar, and lending rates analogously respond to aggregate demand fluctuations. In Mexico, foreign and domestic banks with lower levels of impaired assets have similar loan responsiveness and portfolios. State-owned banks (Argentina) and banks with high levels of impaired assets (Mexico) have more stagnant loan growth and weak responsiveness to market signals. Overall, these findings suggest that bank health, and not ownership per se, is the critical element in the growth, volatility, and cyclicality of bank credit. Diversity in ownership appears to contribute to greater stability of credit in times of crisis and domestic financial system weakness
Exchange rates and wages by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

13 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 59 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Understanding the effects of exchange rate fluctuations across the population is important for increasingly globalized economies. Previous studies using industry aggregate data have found that industry wages are significantly more responsive than industry employment to exchange rate changes. We offer an explanation for this paradoxical finding. Using Current Population Survey data for 1976 through 1998, documenting that the main mechanism for exchange rate effects on wages occurs through job turnover and the strong consequences this has for the wages of workers undergoing such job transitions. By contrast, workers who remain with the same employer experience little, if any, wage impacts from exchange rate shocks. In addition, the finding is that the least educated workers who also have the most frequent job changes shoulder the largest adjustments to exchange rates
When is U.S. bank lending to emerging markets volatile? by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

17 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 58 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Using bank-specific data on U.S. bank claims on individual foreign countries since the mid-1980s, this paper (1) characterizes the size and portfolio diversification patterns of the U.S. banks engaging in foreign lending, and (2) econometrically explores the determinants of fluctuations in U.S. bank claims on a broad set of countries. U.S. bank claims on Latin American and Asian emerging markets, and on industrialized countries, are sensitive to U.S. macroeconomic conditions. When the United States grows rapidly, there is substitution between claims on industrialized countries and claims on the United States. The pattern of response of claims on emerging markets to U.S. conditions differs across banks of different sizes and across emerging market regions. Moreover, we find that, unlike U.S. bank claims on industrialized countries, claims on emerging markets are not highly sensitive to local country GDP and interest rates"--Federal Reserve Bank of New York web site
Financial-sector FDI and host countries : new and old lessons by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

10 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many of the lessons from foreign direct investment (FDI) research on manufacturing and extractive resource industries are applicable to financial-sector FDI. This paper reviews the main findings and policy themes of FDI research, with a primary focus on the host country implications of FDI for emerging market economies. Evidence on technology transfers, productivity spillovers, wage effects, macroeconomic growth, and fiscal and tax concerns are emphasized. Throughout this review, I stress that parallel findings often arise independently in the separate research programs that focus on general and financial-sector FDI. I also emphasize that some important differences between the results of FDI into these sectors are apparent, especially with respect to their implications for local institution building and business cycles. These differences, more so than the similarities, should be the focus of concentrated research efforts
Distribution margins, imported inputs, and the sensitivity of the CPI to exchange rates by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

17 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Border prices of traded goods are highly sensitive to exchange rates, but the CPI, and the retail prices of these goods, are more stable. Our paper decomposes the sources of this stability for twenty-one OECD countries, focusing on the important roles of distribution margins and imported inputs in transmitting exchange rate fluctuations into consumption prices. We provide rich cross-country and cross-industry details on distribution margins and their sensitivity to exchange rates, imported inputs used in different categories of consumption goods, and weights in consumption of nontradables, home tradables and imported goods. While distribution margins damp the sensitivity of consumption prices of tradable goods to exchange rates, they also lead to enhanced pass through when nontraded goods prices are sensitive to exchange rates. Such price sensitivity arises because imported inputs are used in production of home nontradables. Calibration exercises show that, at under 5 percent, the United States has the lowest expected CPI sensitivity to exchange rates of all countries examined. On average, calibrated exchange rate pass through into CPIs is expected to be closer to 15 percent
Vehicle currency use in international trade by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

13 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although currency invoicing in international trade transactions is central to the transmission of monetary policy, the forces motivating the choice of currency have long been debated. We introduce a model wherein agents involved in international trade can invoice in the exporter's currency, the importer's currency, or a third-country vehicle currency. The model is designed to contrast the contribution of macroeconomic variability with that of industry-specific features in the selection of an invoice currency. We show that producers in industries with high demand elasticities are more likely than producers in other industries to display herding in their choice of currency. This industry-related force is more influential than local macroeconomic performance in determining producers' choices. Drawing on data on invoice currency use in exports and imports for twenty-four countries, we document that the dollar is the currency of choice for most transactions involving the United States. The dollar is also extensively used as a vehicle currency in international trade flows that do not directly involve the United States. Consistent with the results of our model, this last finding is largely attributable to international trade in reference-priced and organized-exchange traded goods. Although the magnitude of business-cycle volatility matters for invoicing of more differentiated products, it is less central for invoicing nondifferentiated goods
Trade invoicing in the accession countries : are they suited to the euro? by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

12 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The accession countries to the euro area are increasingly binding their economic activity, external and internal, to the euro area countries. One aspect of this phenomenon concerns the currency invoicing of international trade transactions, where accession countries have reduced their use of the US dollar in invoicing international trade transactions. Theory predicts that the optimal invoicing choices for accession countries depend on the composition of goods in exports and imports and on the macroeconomic fluctuations of trade partners, both bearing on the role of herding and hedging considerations within exporter profitability. These considerations yield country-specific estimates about the degree of euro-denominated invoicing of exports. I find that the exporters of some accession countries, even in their trade transactions with the euro zone and other European Union countries, might be pricing too much of their trade in euros rather than in dollars, thus taking on excessive risk in international markets"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site
Internal currency markets and production in the Soviet Union by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

12 editions published in 1991 in English and Undetermined and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper considers the impact of macroeconomic and microeconomic policy tools on enterprise activities within an economy in the process of economic reform. Assuming a dual exchange rate regime and the type of increased enterprise autonomy introduced as components of partial economic reform as in the Soviet Union, policy changes induce shifts in production and hard currency allocation decisions. This paper considers the implications for: the supply of hard currency to internal auctions or interbank markets; the free internal price of foreign exchange; export volumes; the trade balance; the supply of goods available for internal consumption; and open and hidden inflation. The concentration of market power of producers in domestic industries and the design of currency auctions or interbank markets are key determinants, respectively, of the magnitude and direction of the enterprise responses to policy changes and external shocks
The international exposure of U.S. banks by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

11 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper documents the changing international exposures of U.S. bank balance sheets since the mid-1980s. U.S. banks have foreign positions heavily concentrated in Europe, with more volatile flows to other regions of the world. In recent years some cross-border claims on Latin American countries have declined, while claims extended locally by the branches and subsidiaries of U.S. banks have grown. The foreign exposures of larger U.S. banks tend to be less volatile than claims of smaller banks, and locally-issued claims tend to be more stable than cross-border flows. Business cycle variables have mixed influence on U.S. bank cross-border and local claims. The cross-border claims of U.S. banks on European customers tend to be procyclical. By contrast, locally generated and cross border claims on Latin American customers of U.S. banks are not robustly related to either U.S. or country-specific business cycle variables. U.S. banks do not appear to be strong conduits for transmitting U.S. cycles to these smaller markets, and may instead serve a positive role in stabilizing the amplitude of foreign country cycles
Establishing credibility : evolving perceptions of the European Central Bank by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

10 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The perceptions of a central bank's inflation aversion may reflect institutional structure or, more dynamically, the history of its policy decisions. In this paper, we present a novel empirical framework that uses high frequency data to test for persistent variation in market perceptions of central bank inflation aversion. The first years of the European Central Bank (ECB) provide a natural experiment for this model. Tests of the effect of news announcements on the slope of yield curves in the euro-area, and on the euro/dollar exchange rate, suggest that the market's perception of the policy stance of the ECB during its first six years of operation significantly evolved, with a belief in its inflation aversion increasing in the wake of its monetary tightening. In contrast, tests based on the response of the slope of the United States yield curve to news offer no comparable evidence of any change in market perceptions of the inflation aversion of the Federal Reserve
Micro, macro, and strategic forces in international trade invoicing by Linda S Goldberg( Book )

16 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and Undetermined and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The use of different currencies in the invoicing of international trade transactions plays a major role in the international transmission of economic fluctuations. Existing studies argue that an exporter's invoicing choice reflects structural aspects of her industry, such as market share and the price-sensitivity of demand, the hedging of marginal costs, due for instance to the use of imported inputs, and macroeconomic volatility. We use a new highly disaggregated dataset to assess the roles of the various invoicing determinants. We find support for the factors identified in the literature, and document a new feature, in the form of a link between shipments size and invoicing. Specifically, larger transactions are more likely to be invoiced in the importer's currency. We offer a potential theoretical explanation for the empirical link between transaction size and invoicing by allowing invoicing to be set through a bargaining between exporters and importers, a feature that is absent from existing models despite its empirical relevance
 
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Topics in empirical international economics : a festschrift in honor of Robert E. Lipsey
Alternative Names
Goldberg, L.

Goldberg, Linda

Goldberg, Linda (Linda S.)

Languages
English (286)

Covers
Study guide to accompany Krugman/Obstfeld International economics, theory and policy, fourth edition