WorldCat Identities

Bea, Keith

Overview
Works: 52 works in 80 publications in 1 language and 368 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HV551.3, 363.34
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Keith Bea
Federal disaster policies after terrorists strike : issues and options by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 105 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Emerging issues in homeland security by William M Thaler( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Disaster evacuation and displacement policy issues for Congress by Keith Bea( Book )

7 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina reaches beyond the borders of the states directly affected by the wind, rain, and floods. Before the storm reached the coast, thousands of residents of Louisiana and Mississippi evacuated to other states, including Texas and Oklahoma. Many people, for a variety of reasons, chose to disregard the mandatory evacuation orders issued by state and local officials. In general, evacuation policy is set and enforced by state and local officials. Federal policy provides for various aspects of civilian evacuation. As Members of Congress explore the challenges and losses in the states affected directly or indirectly by Hurricane Katrina, they may be called upon to consider federal policy options to more fully integrate federal and state authorities
Federal Stafford Act Disaster Assistance presidential declarations, eligible activities, and funding by Keith Bea( )

in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (the Stafford Act) authorizes the President to issue major disaster or emergency declarations in response to catastrophes that overwhelm state and local governments. Such declarations result in the distribution of a wide range of federal aid to individuals and families, certain nonprofit organizations, and public agencies. Congress appropriates money to the Disaster Relief Fund (DRF) for disaster assistance authorized by the Stafford Act, which is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Appropriations to the DRF remain available until expended. At the conclusion of the 109th Congress the Senate inserted Stafford Act amendments into the FY2007 DHS appropriations legislation (H.R. 5441, enacted as P.L. 109-295). These amendments, Subtitle E of Title VI (120 Stat. 1444 - 1457), expand FEMA's authority to expedite emergency assistance to stricken areas, impose new planning and preparedness requirements on federal administrators, and increase federal assistance to victims and communities. The amendments, most of which took effect on the date of enactment (October 4, 2006), are summarized in CRS Report RL33729, Federal Emergency Management Policy Changes After Hurricane Katrina: A Summary of Statutory Provisions, coordinated by Keith Bea. Legislation to amend the Stafford Act has received action in the 110th Congress. On July 31, 2008, the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee ordered to be reported H.R. 6658, which would make significant changes in the Stafford Act regarding various issues, including, but not limited to, temporary employees, warning systems, pre-disaster hazard mitigation; the bill also would establish new authorities for existing programs and the funding mechanism. Also, H.R. 2775, reported from the same committee on September 10, 2007, would amend the statute by authorizing the Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) program. Third, the full House approved a bill reauthorizing the Pre-Disaster Mitigation (PDM) program (H.R. 6109). In addition, legislation specific to the administration of Stafford Act provisions in the Gulf Coast (cost-share waivers in H.R. 1591 and cancellation of loan repayment requirements in S. 965) were folded into P.L. 110-28, the U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Act, 2007. This report will be updated as warranted by events or legislative action
Alaska emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Alaska's emergency management statute clarifies and strengthens the roles of the governor, state agencies, and local governments in prevention and preparation for response and recovery from a disaster. The statute also addresses the prevention of disasters caused or aggravated by inadequate planning for, and regulation of, public and private facilities and land use. State and local emergency management plans are tied to environmental plans to create a coordinated response to disasters. Other provisions reside in the civil defense statute which expands gubernatorial and emergency powers and mutual aid agreements to respond to an enemy attack
Political status of Puerto Rico options for Congress by Keith Bea( )

in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico has a unique history as a part of the United States. United States suzerainty over Puerto Rico originated with the acquisition of the islands in 1898 after the conclusion of the Spanish-American War. For decades, the federal government administered government operations in Puerto Rico through military liaisons or civilian officials appointed by the President. Legislation enacted by Congress in 1950 (P.L. 81-600) and in 1952 (P.L. 82-447) granted Puerto Rico authority to establish a republican form of local government through a constitution approved by the citizens of Puerto Rico and the Congress in 1952. Puerto Rico remains subject to congressional jurisdiction under the Territorial Clause of the U.S. Constitution
Disaster management by Keith Bea( Book )

6 editions published between 1993 and 1995 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This approach might be characterized as "developing a Federal 911 capability." However, it also may be argued from a perspective of federalism as well as fiscal prudence that Federal action should continue to hinge on State requests for specific assistance. Third, it has been proposed that the armed forces, including the National Guard and reserves, be given a greater role in responding to disasters. The military's access to material and to transportation facilities appears to support this option. Others question such a policy shift when civilian agencies and voluntary organizations have traditionally been relied upon. Fourth, some argue that the President, Vice President, or high-ranking White House officers should more actively participate in emergency management activities
Federal Emergency Management and Homeland Security Organization : historical developments and legislative options by Henry B Hogue( Book )

5 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf coasts of Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi on August 29, 2005, resulting in severe and widespread damage to the region. The response of the federal government, especially the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in the aftermath of the storm has been widely criticized. Some of the criticism has focused on the organizational arrangements involving FEMA and its parent, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). One month prior to the hurricane, in July 2005, Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff announced plans for a reorganization of DHS, including FEMA. Known as the "Second Stage Review," or "2SR," the reorganization transferred emergency preparedness functions from FEMA to a new Preparedness Directorate, among other changes. The Administration began implementation of the reorganization on October 1, 2005. In response to Administration requests, congressional support for the proposal was provided through approval of the FY2006 appropriations legislation. In the aftermath of the Katrina disaster, administrative structure issues remain a matter of contention. Pending legislation before Congress (H.R. 3656, H.R. 3659, H.R. 3816, H.R. 3685, H.R. 4009, H.R. 4493, S. 1615, S. 2302, and H.R. 4840) would make further changes. The release of reports by the House, Senate, and White House on the response to Hurricane Katrina may lead to further examination of the issues. This report provides background information on the establishment and evolution of federal emergency management organizational arrangements since the end of World War II and briefly summarizes the legislative proposals. More detailed information and analysis concerning this topic may be found in CRS Report RL33064, Organization and Mission of the Emergency Preparedness and Response Directorate: Issues and Options for the 109th Congress, by Keith Bea. For more information on the Chertoff initiative generally, see CRS Report RL33042, Department of Homeland Security Reorganization: The 2SR Initiative, by Harold C. Relyea and Henry B. Hogue. This report will be updated as events warrant
Federal disaster policies after terrorists strike : issues and options for Congress by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Urban Search and Rescue Task Forces: Facts and Issues( Book )

2 editions published between 2006 and 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the early 1990s, Urban Search and Rescue Task Forces have been certified, trained, and funded by the federal government. Twenty-eight task forces are located in 19 states. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials may call out the task force (or forces) in closest proximity to the disaster to help locate and extricate victims from collapsed buildings and structures. The task forces represent a partnership involving federal, local government, and private sector experts. Over $100 million in federal funds have been provided in recent years to equip, train, and assist the task forces that are considered to be part of the federal emergency response network. Two bills (H.R. 88/S. 446) are pending before Congress to designate a New Jersey task force. No other legislative measures have been introduced. This report provides basic information on the task forces, presents some issues that might be addressed by Congress, and will be updated as circumstances warrant
Appropriate technology : a review by Wendy H Schacht( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Federal stafford act disaster assistance : presidential declarations, eligible activities, by Keith Bea( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

FEMA reorganization legislation in the 109th Congress by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Members of Congress have introduced legislation in both the House and Senate to alter federal emergency management organizational structures and responsibilities, amend authorities that guide federal action, impose emergency management leadership qualification requirements, and make other changes. The proposals are based upon investigations conducted on the role of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other entities in the response to Hurricane Katrina in the fall of 2005. Some observers reduce the matter to one basic question: "Should FEMA remain within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), or should the agency regain the independent status it had before the creation of DHS?" The issue, however, is more complex than just one of organizational placement. Other questions include the following: 1) What should be the reach or limit of the entity's authority? 2) What degree of discretion should Congress extend to the President and executive branch officials to act in emergency situations? 3) What functions or responsibilities should be transferred to the new entity? Which should be retained by other DHS entities? 4) How can interagency coordination be ensured? To what extent should the White House be involved in emergency management on a continuing basis as well as during an emergency? 5) How might Congress balance recognition of state sovereignty and primacy in the emergency management field while authorizing prompt federal response? 6) If details such as personnel qualifications, training requirements, performance metrics, and interagency coordination mechanisms are set in statute, will federal agencies have the flexibility to adapt procedures and personnel to dynamic crises? As of the date of this publication, Members have introduced at least 13 bills to reorganize FEMA or reorient the agency's mission. Summary information on the 13 bills, and historical context for debate on the issue, is presented in CRS Report RL33369, Federal Emergency Management and Homeland Security Organization: Historical Developments and Legislative Options. Of the bills pending before Congress, two, H.R. 5316 and H.R. 5351, have been the subject of House committee action. Other bills that have been introduced in the House include H.R. 3656, H.R. 3659, H.R. 3685, H.R. 3816, H.R. 4009, H.R. 4397, H.R. 4493, and H.R. 4840. One bill pending before the Senate, S. 3595, was cosponsored by the chair and ranking member of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. Other Senate bills include S. 1615 and S. 2302. This report will be updated when significant congressional action occurs on the pending legislation
Federal Stafford Act Disaster Assistance presidential declarations, eligible activities, and funding by Keith Bea( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (the Stafford Act) authorizes the President to issue a major disaster declaration to speed a wide range of federal aid to states determined to be overwhelmed by hurricanes or other catastrophes. Financing for the aid is appropriated to the Disaster Relief Fund (DRF), administered by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Funds appropriated to the DRF remain available until expended (a "no-year" account). The Stafford Act authorizes temporary housing, grants for immediate needs of families and individuals, the repair of public infrastructure, emergency communications systems, and other forms of assistance. This report will be updated as warranted by events
Emergency supplemental appropriations for Hurricane Katrina relief by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In response to the widespread destruction caused by Hurricane Katrina, the 109th Congress enacted two FY2005 emergency supplemental appropriations bills (P.L. 109-61 and P.L. 109-62), which together provide $62.3 billion for emergency response and recovery needs. However, the funding streams of these appropriated funds and amounts for disaster recovery changed and might undergo further changes as recovery proceeds. The FY2006 appropriations legislation for the Department of Defense (P.L. 109-148) reallocated funds primarily to pay for the restoration of damaged federal facilities. The reallocated funds were not new appropriations; they were derived from the funds appropriated in the two emergency supplemental statutes, as well as from a government-wide rescission. Also, Congress agreed to transfer $712 million from FEMA to the Small Business Administration for disaster loans (P.L. 109-174). Most recently, on February 16, 2006, the Administration submitted an additional request of $19.8 billion in supplemental FY2006 funding for recovery assistance, an amount reduced to $19.3 billion by Congress in enacting H.R. 4939 (P.L. 109-234). This CRS report summarizes federal disaster assistance funding legislation in the 109th Congress and presents some information on federal expenditures and obligations for disaster recovery activities. This report will be updated as events warrant
Federal emergency management policy changes after Hurricane Katrina a summary of statutory provisions( Book )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Reports issued by committees of the 109th Congress, the White House, federal offices of Inspector General, and the Government Accountability Office (GAO), among others, concluded that the losses caused by Hurricane Katrina and other disasters were due, in part, to deficiencies such as questionable leadership decisions and capabilities, organizational failures, overwhelmed preparation and communication systems, and inadequate statutory authorities. From these conclusions the 109th Congress revised federal emergency management policies vested in the President; reorganized the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA); and enhanced and clarified the mission, functions, and authorities of the agency, as well as those of its parent, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). This report will be updated as developments warrant."--Page 2
Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies: FY2007 Appropriations( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The FY2007 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies appropriations bill includes funding for the Department of the Interior (DOI), except for the Bureau of Reclamation, and for two agencies within other departments the Forest Service within the Department of Agriculture and the Indian Health Service within the Department of Health and Human Services. It also includes funding for arts and cultural agencies; the Environmental Protection Agency, which was recently transferred to the appropriations subcommittees that deal with Interior and Related Agencies; and numerous other entities and agencies. On June 29, 2006, the Senate Appropriations Committee reported H.R. 5386 (S. Rept. 109-275), providing $26.05 billion for Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies for FY2007, $110.8 million (0.4%) above the House-passed level ($25.94 billion). The Senate Appropriations Committee-reported level would have been a $384.0 million (1%) decrease from the FY2006 enacted level of $26.44 billion, but a $522.8 million (2%) increase over the President s request for FY2007 of $25.53 billion. Among the proposed decreases in the Senate Appropriations Committee reported bill for FY2007, from the FY2006 level, were the following: $-209.5 million (9%) for the National Park Service (NPS); $-153.5 million (10%) for the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS); $-123.6 million (3%) for the Forest Service (FS); and $-108.5 million (1%) for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Among the increases for FY2007 were the following: $147.5 million (5%) for the Indian Health Service (IHS); $50.2 million (3%) for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM); and $29.3 million (5%) for the Smithsonian Institution
Arizona emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The governor and the director of the state of Washingtons Emergency Management Division are authorized to carry out state programs, coordinate with local governments and serve as liaison with federal and other state governments. The emergency management council conducts an annual state emergency preparedness assessment. Special accounts have been established in the state treasury for natural disasters; in addition, funds in these accounts may be used for national security preparedness. The statutory code contains provisions related to search and rescue and pipeline safety. If the governor is unable to fulfill the duties of the office, legislative leaders are to assume the role, or legislators may elect an acting governor. The location of the capital may be moved if necessary. This report is one of a series that profiles emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each profile identifies the more significant elements of state statutes, generally as codified. Congressional readers may wish to conduct further searches for related provisions using the Internet link presented in the last section of this report. The National Conference of State Legislatures provided primary research assistance in the development of these profiles under contract to the Congressional Research Service (CRS). Summary information on all of the profiles is presented in CRS Report RL32287. This report will be updated as developments warrant. CRS-2
Emergency Preparedness and Response Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-296) requires the Emergency Preparedness and Response Directorate (EPR) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to coordinate federal emergency management activities. The law consolidates federal emergency authorities and resources into EPR -- but not terrorism preparedness activities, which are administered by the Border and Transportation Security Directorate within DHS. This report provides summaries of and references to the entities that constitute EPR, as well as brief statements of issues that may come before the 108th Congress. This report will be updated as significant events implementing the legislation occur
Federal Emergency Management Agency funding for homeland security and other activities by Keith Bea( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In response to the terrorist attacks in the fall of 2001, the Bush Administration requested funds in the FY2003 budget for the Federal Emergency Management agency (FEMA) that emphasize the agency's homeland security mission. The admin istration has requested a total of $6.6 billion for the agency. Of perhaps greatest significance, more than half of the funds requested for the agency ($3.5 million) would be used for the First Responders Initiative. The Initiative would provide grants to state and local police, fire, and other emergency personnel for equipment purchases, improvement of communications capabilities, and training
 
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Federal disaster policies after terrorists strike : issues and options
Alternative Names
Bea, Keith A. (Keith Alan)

Languages
English (46)

Covers
Emerging issues in homeland security