WorldCat Identities

Max Planck Institut für Psycholinguistik (Nijmegen, Netherlands)

Overview
Works: 45 works in 83 publications in 3 languages and 3,888 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Periodicals 
Roles: Editor, Publisher, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Netherlands) Max Planck Institut für Psycholinguistik (Nijmegen
 
Most widely held works by Netherlands) Max Planck Institut für Psycholinguistik (Nijmegen
Space in language and cognition : explorations in cognitive diversity by Stephen C Levinson( )

4 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and held by 1,897 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Languages differ in how they describe space, and such differences between languages can be used to explore the relation between language and thought. This book shows that even in a core cognitive domain, such as spatial thinking, language influences how people think, memorize and reason about spatial relations and directions. After outlining a typology of spatial coordinate systems in language and cognition, it is shown that not all languages use all types, and that non-linguistic cognition mirrors the systems available in the local language. The book reports on collaborative, interdisciplinary research, involving anthropologists, linguists and psychologists, conducted in many languages and cultures around the world, which establishes this robust correlation. The overall results suggest that most current thinking in the cognitive sciences underestimates the transformative power of language on thinking. The book will appeal to all researchers interested in the relation of language to other areas of cognition - linguists, psychologists, anthropologists, philosophers - and especially to students of spacial cognition."--Jacket
Lexical representation and process by William Marslen-Wilson( )

15 editions published between 1989 and 1992 in English and held by 1,559 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Part 1 Psychological models of lexical processing: access and integration - projecting sound onto meaning, William Marslen-Wilson; visual word recognition and pronunciation - a computational model and its implications, Mark S. Seidenberg; basic issues in lexical processing, Kenneth I. Forster; lexical access in speech production, Brian Butterworth; the retrieval of phonological forms in production - test of predictions from a connectionist model, Gary S. Dell. Part 2 The nature of the input: review of selected models of speech perception, Dennis H. Klatt; connectionist approaches to acoustic phonetic processing, Jeffrey L. Elman; parafoveal preview effects and lexical access during eye fixations in reading, Keith Rayner and David A. Balota; reading and the mental lexicon - on the uptake of visual information, Derek Besner and James C. Johnston. Part 3 Lexical structure and process: understanding words and word recognition - can phonology help?, Uli H. Frauenfelder and Aditi Lahiri; auditory lexical access - where do we start?, Anne Cutler; on mental representation of morphology and its diagnosis by measures of visual access speed, Leslie Henderson; morphological parsing and the lexicon, Jorge Hankamer; psycholinguistic issues in the lexical representation of meaning, Robert Schreuder and Giovanni B. Flores D'Arcais. Part 4 Parsing and interpretation: the role of lexical representation in language comprehension, Lorraine Komisarjevsky Tyler; grammar, interpretation and processing from the lexicon, Mark J. Steedman; against lexical generation of syntax, Lyn Frazier; lexical structure and language comprehension, Michael K. Tanenhaus and Greg N. Carlson
Semantics in acquisition by Veerle Van Geenhoven( Book )

3 editions published between 2006 and 2008 in English and held by 110 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contains a collection of writings that focuses on semantic phenomena and their interpretation in the analysis of the language of a learner. This volume addresses a variety of phenomena such as: temporal aspect and tense, specificity, quantification, scope, finiteness, focus structure, and focus particles
Research report by Netherlands) Max Planck Institut für Psycholinguistik (Nijmegen( )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 95 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annual report by Netherlands) Max Planck Institut für Psycholinguistik (Nijmegen( )

in English and Dutch and held by 58 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen by Netherlands) Max Planck Institut für Psycholinguistik (Nijmegen( Book )

3 editions published between 1991 and 2000 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

MPI series in psycholinguistics by Netherlands) Max Planck Institut für Psycholinguistik (Nijmegen( )

in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The CELEX lexical database( )

2 editions published in 1995 in German and English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Describes 124,136 lemmas and 381,292 wordforms in Dutch, 52,446 lemmas and 160,594 wordforms in English, and 50,708 lemmas and 359,611 wordforms in German. The information is presented in a series of plain ASCII files that can be queried with tools such as AWK and ICON. Unique identity numbers allow the linking of information from different files
Max-Planck-Institut für Psycholinguistik by Netherlands) Max Planck Institut für Psycholinguistik (Nijmegen( Book )

1 edition published in 1990 in German and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Child's conception of language by A Sinclair( Book )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Linguistic and nonlinguistic coding of spatial arrays : explorations in Mayan cognition by Penelope Brown( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Producing complex spoken numerals for time and space by Marjolein Henriëtte Wilhelmina Meeuwissen( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This thesis addressed the spoken production of complex numerals for time and space. The production of complex numerical expressions like those involved in telling time (e.g., "quarter to four") or producing house numbers (e.g., "two hundred forty-five") has been almost completely ignored. Yet, adult speakers produce such expressions on a regular basis in everyday communication. Thus, no theory on numerical cognition or speech production is complete without an account of the production of multi-morphemic utterances such as complex numeral expressions. The main question of this thesis is which particular speech planning levels are involved in the naming and reading of complex numerals for time and space. More specifically, this issue was investigated by examining different modes of response (clock times versus house numbers), alternative input formats (Arabic digit versus alphabetic format; analog versus digital clock displays), and different expression types (relative "quarter to four" versus absolute "three forty-five" time expressions)
How your genome helps you speak by Simon E Fisher( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Agrammatism by Mary-Louise Kean( Book )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Agrammatism provides an overview of the state of knowledge on agrammatism, typically defined as a disorder of sentence production involving the selective omission of function words and some grammatical endings on words. The book opens with discussions of the diversity of the disorder. This is followed by separate chapters that address primarily questions of syntactic structure in agrammatism, from both linguistic and psycholinguistic perspectives. Within these two gross sections there is no consensus among the conclusions reached by the various authors. However, the position is taken that agrammatism is a disorder distinct from other aphasie disorders of sentence structure. This position is reconsidered in the final two chapters. Because of the intrinsically interdisciplinary character of research on agrammatism, it is hoped that the work presented in this volume will be of interest to linguists and psycholinguists working in areas outside the domain of aphasia, as well as to neurolinguists and neuropsychologists who are already involved in the study of language deficits
Contextual influences on spoken-word processing : an electrophysiological approach by Dannie van den Brink( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The aim of this thesis was to gain more insight into spoken-word comprehension and the influence of sentence-contextual information on these processes using ERPs. By manipulating critical words in semantically constraining sententes, in semantic or syntactic sense, and examining the consequences in the electrophysiological signal (e.g., elicitation of ERP components such as the N400, N200, LAN, and P600), three questions were tackled: I At which moment is context information used in the spoken-word recognition process? II What is the temporal relationship between lexical selection and integration of the meaning of a spoken word into a higher-order level representeation of the preceding sentence? III What is the time course of the processing of different sources of linguistic information obtained from the context, such as phonological, semantic and syntactic information, during spoken-word comprehension? From the results of this thesis it can be concluded that sentential context already exerts an influence on spoken-word processing at approximately 200 ms after word onset. In addition, semantic integration is attempted before a spoken word can be selected on the basis of the acoustic signal, i.e. before lexical selection is completed. Finally, knowledge of the syntactic category of a word is not needed before semantic integration can take place. These findings, therefore, were interpreted as providing evidence for an account of cascaded spoken-word processing that proclaims an optimal use of contextual information during spoken-word identification. Optimal use is accomplished by allowing for semantic and syntactic processing to take place in parallel after bottom-up activation of a set of candidates, and lexical integration to proceed with a limited number of candidates that still match the acoustic input
Paradigmatic structures in morphological processing : computational and cross-linguistic experimental studies by Fermín Moscoso del Prado Martín( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Perceptual relevance of prevoicing in Dutch by Petra Martine van Alphen( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this dissertation the perceptual relevance of prevoicing in Dutch was investigated. Prevoicing is the presence of vocal fold vibration during the closure of initial voiced plosives (negative voice onset time). The presence or absence of prevoicing is generally used to describe the difference between voiced and voiceless Dutch plosives. The first experiment described in this dissertation showed that prevoicing is frequently absent in Dutch and that several factors affect the production of prevoicing. A detailed acoustic analysis of the voicing distinction identified several acoustic correlates of voicing. Prevoicing appeared to be by far the best predictor. Perceptual classification data revealed that prevoicing was indeed the strongest cue that listeners use when classifying plosives as voiced or voiceless. In the cases where prevoicing was absent, other acoustic cues influenced classification, such that some of these tokens were still perceived as being voiced. In the second part of this dissertation the influence of prevoicing variation on spoken-word recognition was examined. In several cross-modal priming experiments two types of prevoicing variation were contrasted: a difference between the presence and absence of prevoicing (6 versus 0 periods of prevoicing) and a difference in the amount of prevoicing (12 versus 6 periods). All these experiments indicated that primes with 12 and 6 periods of prevoicing had the same effect on lexical decisions to the visual targets. The primes without prevoicing had a different effect, but only when their voiceless counterparts were real words. Phonetic detail appears to influence lexical access only when it is useful: In Dutch, the presence versus absence of prevoicing is informative, while the amount of prevoicing is not
The possessive of experience in Belhare by Balthasar Bickel( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Language as context, language as means : spatial cognition and habitual language use by Eric Pederson( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Space in language and cognition : explorations in cognitive diversity
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Lexical representation and processSemantics in acquisition
Alternative Names
Institut Psikolinguistik Max Planck

Katholieke universiteit Nijmegen Max-Planck-Institut für Psycholinguistik

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften Max-Planck-Institut für Psycholinguistik

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften Max Planck Instituut voor Psycholinguïstiek

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften Planck-Institut für Psycholinguistik

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften Planck Instituut voor Psycholinguïstiek

Max-Planck-Institut für Psycholinguistik

Max-Planck-Institut für Psycholinguistik Nijmegen

Max-Planck-Institut für Psycholinguistik. Nimègue, Pays-Bas

Max Planck Institut für Psychologie (Nigmegen, Netherlands)

Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics Nijmegen

Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (Nijmegen, Netherlands)

Max-Planck Institute for psycholinguistics (Nimègue, Pays-Bas)

Max-Planck-Instituut voor Psycholinguïstiek

Max-Planck-Instituut voor Psycholinguïstiek Nijmegen

MIP für Psychologie

MIP für Psychologie Nimègue, Pays-Bas

MPI for Psycholinguistics

MPI for Psycholinguistics Nijmegen

MPI für Psycholinguistik (Nijmegen, Netherlands)

MPI voor Psycholinguïstiek

MPI voor Psycholinguïstiek Nijmegen

Planck-Institut für Psycholinguistik

Planck-Institut für Psycholinguistik Nijmegen

Planck Institut für Psycholinguistik (Nijmegen, Netherlands)

Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics Nijmegen

Planck Instituut voor Psycholinguïstiek

Planck Instituut voor Psycholinguïstiek Nijmegen

Институт психолингвистики Макса Планка

Інститут психолінгвістики Макса Планка

Languages
English (54)

German (3)

Dutch (2)