WorldCat Identities

Du Mont Television Network

Overview
Works: 261 works in 287 publications in 1 language and 1,173 library holdings
Genres: Documentary films  Nonfiction films  Nonfiction television programs  Cultural television programs  Concert television programs 
Classifications: E178, 784.2184
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Du Mont Television Network
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Fritz Reiner, conductor( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Under the leadership of Fritz Reiner (1888-1953), the Chicago Symphony Orchestra attained an enviable status among world orchestras. Having previously guest conducted at both Orchstra Hall and the Ravinia Festival, Reiner was no stranger to Chicago when he became the Orchestra's music director in 1953. This televised concert from 1954 captures the excitement generated by this famed collaboration of conductor and orchestra."--Container
Rh factor( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1939 the presence of the Rh factor was discovered to be in the blood of a large majority of human beings. This explains the some of the problems in pregancy and childbirth when a father is Rh positive and the mother is Rh negative, which can cause hemolytic disease of newborns
Captain Video and his Video Rangers( Visual )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the year 2254, Captain Video and his army of Video Rangers travel the galaxy protecting the weak and defenseless from cosmic villains usually led by Dr. Pauli. Also includes some of the originally broadcast commercials
Science coast to coast( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this program Lynn Poole asks local alumni of national universities to introduce the scientific research occurring in their alma maters. Dr. Brownlee Corrin, a professor at Goucher College and alumnus of Stanford University, describes the campus and its electron linear accelerator. Photos show Director Edward Ginzton and the operation of this new atom smasher. Alumnus of the University of California, Dr. Richard McQuaid, tells about the university, and photos show Dr. George H. Hart and his research on cattle grazing. Carl Foster, alumnus of Indiana University, lists some of that university's famous scientists. A film documents the work being done there by Dr. Joseph C. Muhler, Dr. Harry G. Day, and Dr. William H. Nebergall on the effects of fluorides on children's teeth. Baltimore Judge Joseph Kolodny describes Boston University, and photos from that institution show staff of the Physical Research Lab demonstrating an aerial camera, which uses glass spherical negatives. Assistant dean and alumnus of New York University Dr. F.K. Teichman describes that school's programs. To research air pollution, NYU's engineering research division has constructed a smoke tunnel to observe the behavior of plant emissions based on stack speed and wind velocity and a wind tunnel to determine how building design affects smoke flume behavior. Current scientific activities at The Johns Hopkins University include diffraction gratings used in a spectroscope, research on cancer, and trace element studies, all of which will be featured on forthcoming programs. In closing, Lynn Poole announces that Brookhaven National Labs opened their cosmotron today
You asked for it( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A wonderful snapshot of what Americans were curious about in the 50s, You asked for it debuted in 1950 and continued offering its special "believe-it-or-not brand of entertainment on ABC until 1959. Each week for nearly a decade, inquiring viewers from all over the country wrote in requesting to see the strange and bizarre. The show's producers delivered it all, from the sublime to the ridiculous, the heart-lifting to the heart-stopping, and everything in between!"--Container
The New York times youth forum( Visual )

2 editions published in 1956 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A weekly series of programs, founded by Dorothy Gordon, adapted for the encouragement and stimulation of youth in spontaneous discussion of national and international issues. Not an interview program, the session belongs primarily to the youth participants, which include [boys and girls] who offer their views on economic, racial and religious matters."--1956 Peabody Digest. The question for this episode is: "Are trust territories becoming independent?" The guest is Dr. Benjamin A. Cohen, Under-Secretary for Trusteeships, United Nations
Epidemic theory Ct+1=St (1-qct), what is it?( Visual )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using diagrams, Dr. Lowell J. Reed first describes the history of epidemics, the origins of disease, using measles and small pox as examples, and means of transmission. He then demonstrates the epidemic theory where St is the number of people susceptible to the disease over time multipled by 1 minus qct (the probability of a person with the disease meeting a susceptible person) equals C t+1(cases over time). Also factored into this equation is the number of people who develop an immunity to the disease after recovering from it. The theory is then tested against experience. Dr. Reed sets up an experiment demonstrating the practical application of the theory using a model. He then discusses epidemic control focusing on isolation of people who already have the disease, and immuniztion of people who are susceptible to the disease
Highlights in review( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Host Lynn Poole reviews highlights of programs from the past year: "A Hospital Never Sleeps" (1/21/52) takes viewers behind the scenes at Johns Hopkins Hospital at night; "Artist and the Doctor" (12/17/51) reveals medical artists' work, including photographic art and "moulage" at the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine founded by Max Brodel in 1885 at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; "The World From 78 Miles Up" (9/11/51) shows film clips, diagrams, and explanation of the operation of the Navy's Aerobee rocket as it gathers atmospheric data; "Solar Power for Food and Fuel" (2/11/51) describes solar energy research and offers an explanation and microscopic view of plant cells engaged in photosynthesis; "Is It True?" (10/22/51) differentiates between the myths and facts about hypnosis; "It's a Fact" (12/3/51) demonstrates the facts of radiant heat using a Crooke's radiometer and explains Bernoulli's Principle; "Krilium for Tomorrow" (2/4/52) introduces Monsanto's soil conditioner for creating porous soil for better plant growth and uses time lapse photography to show plants' growth rate in the product
You asked for it( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A wonderful snapshot of what Americans were curious about in the 50s, You asked for it debuted in 1950 and continued offering its special "believe-it-or-not brand of entertainment on ABC until 1959. Each week for nearly a decade, inquiring viewers from all over the country wrote in requesting to see the strange and bizarre. The show's producers delivered it all, from the sublime to the ridiculous, the heart-lifting to the heart-stopping, and everything in between!"--Container
Stars in your skies( Visual )

2 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The program begins with a discussion of the solar system with the sun in the center and the nine planets, with their satellites or moons. Comets also travel around the sun in very irregular orbits. Great clusters of billions of stars form galaxies. The earth is near the center of the galaxy known as the Milky Way. Stars are arranged into the constellations that have distinctive configurations
The fight against polio( Visual )

2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The film takes the audience on a tour of the Children's Hospital School in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Lenhard describes the symptoms of poliomyelitis and the modalities used to combat its effects. The audience is brought into the exercise room where a physical therapist manipulates the legs of a child with polio. Henry O'Kendall is giving another child a muscle test, testing the strength of the muscles in the shoulder and the hand. As the program progresses, the children are brought into the treatment pool. Because of the buoyancy of the water, the children can exercise with minimal assistance. The use of braces and crutches is demonstrated. Iron lungs are also shown for use by children who need respiratory assistance
Scientists of tomorrow( Visual )

2 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lynn Poole gives the statistics of U.S. graduates in science and predicts the numbers through 1961, noting that a growing supply of competent scientists is critical. He discusses "juvenile delinquents" and suggests that a constructive way to guide them is through the Science Talent Search. In order to qualify, student contestants must submit answers to an examination measuring their science aptitude, a record of their grades, personal data by their teachers, and a 1,000-word project report. In the thirteenth annual Talent Search for Westinghouse Science Scholarships, 32 boys and 8 girls throughout the United States received a trip to Washington, D.C. to compete for final scholarships. Photos show some finalists during their trip visiting such scientific sites as the Bureau of Standards, the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, the National Institutes of Health, and the Naval Ordnance Lab. In the studio, $400 scholarship winners Mary Jeanne Kreek, of Woodrow Wilson High School in Washington, D.C., explains her project on allergies, and Victor A. Schmidt, of Milford Mill High School in Baltimore County, demonstrates his planetarium project. The program concludes with photos of a random selection of the other forty winners and their projects
Industrial hygiene( Visual )

2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This television program discusses industrial hygiene. The program focuses on 1) the identification of occupational diseases; 2) research into the cause of industrial pollution; and 3) correction of industrial pollution and prevention of occupational diseases. The emphasis of this program is on atmospheric contamination. Dr. Anna Baetjer highlights the research aspects of industrial hygiene. She notes that it is the industrial hygienist's role to determine if chemicals and particles in the air are harmful to people. She provides examples of harmful pollutants, such as silica, coal dust, and carbon tetrachloride, and shows the tests for these pollutants in the laboratory. Then Charles E. Couchman, an industrial hygienist for the city of Baltimore, shows how pollutants populate an industrial plant and how the testing takes place. Mr. Alan D. Brantz, the industrial hygienist for the Bethlehem Steel Corporation, then demonstrates how hoods are used as exhaust systems for industrial plants, and shows other means of obviating pollution problems. Photographs are used to show the collection and removal of particulate matter. Monitoring equipment is also demonstrated
What you should know about biological warfare( Visual )

2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This video, originally produced for television, discusses the myths about biological warfare and the dangers of spreading misinformation. The production provides a definition of biological warfare and its effects on people, and uses demonstrations and still photographs. Dr. Victor Haas of the United States Public Health Service and the National Institutes of Health discusses influenza, Q fever, and encephalitis as possible instruments of biological warfare. Dr. Alexander Langmuir from the Communicable Disease Center in Atlanta comments on possible contamination of air and water, and on the defenses put in place by the Dept. of Agriculture, the United States Public Health Service, and the Bureau of Customs. Dr. Norvi C. Kieffer, director of the Health and Special Weapons Division of the Federal Defense Administration, discusses procedures implemented on the national level
News from the sky( Visual )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Explorations of the upper atmosphere are made through telemetering or the measuring of remote objects from afar. Rockets take these measuring devices into the upper atmosphere to measure cosmic ray intensity, fuel consumption, oil pressure, air speed, altitude, and the magnitude of the earth's magnetic field. Receivers on earth will retrieve the measurements transmitted from space through a radio link. Current uses of this information aid in the development of guided missiles
Johnny Jupiter( Visual )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents two segments from the television show, Johnny Jupiter, aired in 1953. In each segment, Ernest, a general-store clerk and inventor of a device through which he communicates with Jupiter, receives help from his friends on Jupiter when he gets into difficulty. With commercials
Don't drink that water( Visual )

2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Telegrams from educators and scholars mark the third anniversary of the Johns Hopkins Science Review. Dr. Abel Wolman summarizes the history of methods of acquiring pure water and the science of sanitary engineering. Chlorine was discovered to be a reliable and practical chemical to use to kill water-borne bacteria. Dr. Wolman also shows a film of microscopic organisms and silt in water and discusses the decline of typhoid fever. Dr. Wolman and his colleagues use both animated films and models of a water filtration plant and a sewage treatment plant to explain the water purification processes
X-ray, the super sleuth( Visual )

2 editions published between 1990 and 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lynn Poole invites members of the Federal Communications Committee, meeting in Washington, DC for hearings on the use of television as an educational medium, to watch this program as a practical example of how educational institutions can bring educational programs to the American people. This is the first public showing and demonstration of a combination of x-ray photography and fluoroscopy picked up by a television receiving tube, affording both dynamic and clear internal views of patients. The equipment was constructed at The Johns Hopkins University with funds from the U.S. Public Health Service and developed by Dr. Russell H. Morgan. Dr. Morgan shows and explains the dim images of a standard fluoroscope and the static x-rays of a chest, colon, and kidney produced on a radiographic table to compare the strengths and weaknesses of each procedure. With physicist Ralph Sterm at the controls and assisted by Vernon Bowers, Ed Custer, and Roy Collier, Dr. Morgan then demonstrates his new invention, which amplifies images 300-3,000 times, and x-rays the movement of the chest and hand of Joan Hunter for viewers to see. Finally, in the first live television, inter-city diagnosis, Dr. Paul C. Hodges, at the University of Chicago, and Dr. Waldron Sennott, at the U.S. Marine Hospital in New York, observe the x-ray/fluoroscopy images broadcast on their televisions and consult with Dr. David Gould, at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, and together diagnose and prescribe treatment for a patient, machine operator James Carter, who has metal particles clearly lodged in his chest and possibly his lungs
Science of toys( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is an updated production of a program originally broadcast two years earlier, entitled "Science of toys." Lynn Poole points out that over 1,400 different toys are now manufactured for learning and sportsmanship. He visits a studio toy shop with local child Joey Vitale where "shopkeeper" John Lockwood explains the science of such toys as slinky pull trains, punching bags, gear toys, a helicopter launcher, an electric airplane and steam engine, wind-up toys, and cog-driven toys. The trio also looks at how flexible plastics are now used to make some toys safer and dolls softer. They consider polarization in magnets, static electricity in balloons, ball bearings in bike wheels, and how toys were invented. Kits on the shelf include a chemistry set, a super sleuth science kit, and a weatherman set
The usefulness of useless knowledge( Visual )

2 editions published between 1952 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This television show examines the basic research associated with a university. When research is in its initial stages, the information generated does not appear to have any useful application. By using case studies, the show demonstrates that basic research can have profound implications. The show begins with a discussion with Dr. Abel Wolman on the definition of a university and the university's role in the search for truth. Dr. Wolman provides some examples of how seemingly insignificant research can lead to important discoveries
 
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Alternative Names
DuMont Cadena de televisión comercial de los Estados Unidos entre 1946 y 1956

DuMont Television Network

デュモント (テレビ局)

杜蒙特電視網

杜蒙電視網

Languages
English (58)

Covers
The Du Mont Television Network : what happened? : a significant episode in the history of broadcasting