WorldCat Identities

Ginsberg, Matthew L. 1955-

Overview
Works: 31 works in 89 publications in 1 language and 937 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Textbooks 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: Q335, 006.3
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Matthew L Ginsberg
Essentials of artificial intelligence by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

17 editions published between 1993 and 2012 in English and held by 477 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since its publication, Essentials of Artificial Intelligence has beenadopted at numerous universities and colleges offering introductory AIcourses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Based on the author'scourse at Stanford University, the book is an integrated, cohesiveintroduction to the field. The author has a fresh, entertaining writingstyle that combines clear presentations with humor and AI anecdotes. At thesame time, as an active AI researcher, he presents the materialauthoritatively and with insight that reflects a contemporary, first hand
Readings in nonmonotonic reasoning( Book )

11 editions published in 1987 in English and Undetermined and held by 263 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Non-monotonic reasoning : 2nd international workshop, Grassau, FRG, June 1988 : proceedings by M Reinfrank( )

3 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume contains revised and extended versions of the papers presented at the Second International Workshop on Non-Monotonic Reasoning, held in Grassau (FRG), June 13-15, 1988. The workshop brought together researchers with different backgrounds, including non-monotonic logic, logic programming, truth maintenance and philosophy. Their papers contain substantial advances to the logical foundations of non-monotonic reasoning, its computational realization, and its application to the formalization of common sense reasoning. The book presents a snapshot of the state of the art in this research area, and provides in-depth discussions of current problems and approaches
Counterfactuals by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

8 editions published in 1984 in English and Undetermined and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Counterfactuals are a form of commonsense non-monotonic inference that has been of long-term interest to philosophers. This paper begins by describing some of the impact counterfactuals can be expected to have in artificial intelligence, and by reviewing briefly some of the philosophical conclusions which have been drawn about them. Philosophers have noted that the content of any particular counterfactual is in part context-dependent; we present a formal description of counterfactuals that allows us to encode this context-dependent information clearly in the choice of a sublanguage of the logical language in which we are working. Having made this choice, we show that our description of counterfactuals is formally identical to the accepted possible worlds interpretation due to David Lewis. Finally, we examine the application of our ideas in the domain of automated diagnosis of hardware faults. Additional keywords: operators(mathematics); mathematical logic; semantics; artificial intelligence. (Author)
Decision procedures by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

7 editions published in 1985 in English and Undetermined and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Distributed artificial intelligence is the study of how a group of individual intelligent agents can combine to solve a difficult global problem; the usual approach is to split the original problem into simpler ones and to attack each to these independently. This paper discusses in very general terms the problems which arise if the subproblems are not independent, but instead interrelate in some way. We are led to a single assumption, which we call common rationality, that is provably optimal (in a formal sense) and which enables us to characterize precisely the communication needs of the participants in multi-agent interactions. An example of a distributed computation using these ideas is presented
Controlling recursive inference by David E Smith( Book )

6 editions published in 1985 in English and Undetermined and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Loosely speaking, recursive inference is when an inference procedure generates an infinite sequence of similar subgoals. In general the control of recursive inference involves demonstrating that recursive portions of a search space will not contribute any new answers to the problem beyond a certain level. We first review a well known syntactic method for controlling repeating inference (inference where the conjuncts processed are instances of the ancestors), provide a proof that it is correct, and discuss the conditions under which the strategy is optimal. We also derive more powerful pruning theorems for cases involving transitivity axioms and cases involving subsumed subgoals. The treatment of repeating inference is followed by consideration of the more difficult problem of recursive inference that does not repeat. Here we show how knowledge of the properties of the relations involved and knowledge about the contents of the system's database can be used to prove that portions of a search space will not contribute any new answers
Solving the Prisoner's dilemma by Michael R Genesereth( Book )

6 editions published in 1984 in English and Undetermined and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A framework is proposed for analyzing various types of rational interaction. We consider a variety of restrictions on participants' moves; each leads to a different characterization of rational behavior. Under an assumption of common rationality, it is proven that participants will cooperate, rather than defect, in the Prisoner's Dilemma. We will follow the usual convention of representing a game as a payoff matrix. This is a unified framework for considering various types of interactions that occur without communication. Using assumptions about what types of moves other agents will make, a participant is able to reason about what constitutes rational behavior on its own part. Several of the characterizations of rationality have parallels in existing game theory literature, and lead to familiar results such as case analysis and iterated case analysis
Implementing probabilistic reasoning by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cooperation without communication by Michael R Genesereth( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reasoning about action I : a possible worlds approach by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Does probability have a place in non-monotonic reasoning? by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

2 editions published between 1984 and 1985 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Artificial intelligence applications in hardware disgnosis by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Plan Debugging Using Approximate Domain Theories by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The overall goal of this project was to investigate the idea that planning in the presence of uncertain information could be easier, not harder, than planning in its absence. The basic reason proposed was that, since it is impossible to control planning search with precision, uncertain domain information had a potential for use in this area that more accurate information might lack. This suggestion turned out to be correct. During the course of the project, we developed compelling theoretical arguments showing that reasoning can be controlled more generally by using uncertain domain information than by using existing techniques such as hierarchy. Doing so, however, involves surmounting substantial practical difficulties in terms of both the underlying planning technology and our ability to manipulate uncertain information itself. This report describes these theoretical arguments and the problems (and potential solutions) that an implementation exploiting our ideas must face. (AN)
Logic programming by Michael R Genesereth( Book )

2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Multivalued Logics by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Supermodels and Robustness( )

1 edition published in 1998 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Non-monotonic reasoning using Dempster's rule by Stanford University( Book )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Knowledge Interchange Format: the KIF of Death by Matthew L Ginsberg( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

There has been a good deal of discussion recently about the possibility of standardizing knowledge representation efforts, including the development of an interlingua, or knowledge interchange format (KIF), that would allow developers of declarative knowledge to share their results with other AI researchers. In this article, I examine the practicality of this idea. I present some philosophical arguments against it, describe a straw-man KIF, and suggest specific experiments that would help explore these issues
Analysing incomplete information by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dynamic backtracking by Matthew L Ginsberg( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The goal of this project was to turn the intuitions behind dynamic backtracking into a series of formally verified algorithms, implement the algorithms, and test the results on realistic problems. These goals have been met and exceeded. Dynamic backtracking has been generalized to partial-order dynamic backtracking, and has been formalized, tested on academic benchmarks, and applied (by one of CTRL's industrial partners) to real industrial scheduling problems. Of equal importance, the search for novel search algorithms for scheduling problems has led beyond dynamic backtracking to include new techniques, such as limited discrepancy search and doubleback optimization, that are currently the best known techniques for benchmark scheduling problems of realistic size and character
 
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Essentials of artificial intelligence
Alternative Names
Ginsberg, Matt

Ginsberg, Matt 1955-

Languages
English (70)

Covers
Non-monotonic reasoning : 2nd international workshop, Grassau, FRG, June 1988 : proceedings