WorldCat Identities

Cohen, Wesley Marc

Overview
Works: 29 works in 83 publications in 2 languages and 2,350 library holdings
Genres: Patents  History  Filmed panel discussions 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: T211.C64, 346.730486
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Wesley Marc Cohen
Patents in the knowledge-based economy by National Research Council( Book )

13 editions published between 1900 and 2004 in English and held by 194 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume assembles papers commissioned by the National Research Council's Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) to inform judgments about the significant institutional and policy changes in the patent system made over the past
Protecting their intellectual assets : appropriability conditions and why U.S. manufacturing firms patent (or not) by Wesley Marc Cohen( Book )

15 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Based on a survey questionnaire administered to 1478 R & D labs in the U.S. manufacturing sector in 1994, we find that firms typically protect the profits due to invention with a range of mechanisms, including patents, secrecy, lead time advantages and the use of complementary marketing and manufacturing capabilities. Of these mechanisms, however, patents tend to be the least emphasized by firms in the majority of manufacturing industries, and secrecy and lead time tend to be emphasized most heavily. A comparison of our results with the earlier survey findings of Levin et al. [1987] suggest that patents may be relied upon somewhat more heavily by larger firms now than in the early 1980s. For the protection of product innovations, secrecy now appears to be much more heavily employed across most industries than previously. Our results on the motives to patent indicate that firms patent for reasons that often extend beyond directly profiting from a patented innovation through either its commercialization or licensing. In addition to the prevention of copying, the most prominent motives for patenting include the prevention of rivals from patenting related inventions (i.e., patent blocking'), the use of patents in negotiations and the prevention of suits. We find that firms commonly patent for different reasons in discrete' product industries, such as chemicals, versus complex' product industries, such as telecommunications equipment or semiconductors. In the former, firms appear to use their patents commonly to block the development of substitutes by rivals, and in the latter, firms are much more likely to use patents to force rivals into negotiations
R & D and the patent premium by Ashish Arora( Book )

6 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: We analyze the effect of patenting on R & D with a model linking a firm's R & D effort with its decision to patent, recognizing that R & D and patenting affect one another and are both driven by many of the same factors. Using survey data for the U.S. manufacturing sector, we estimate the increment to the value of an innovation realized by patenting it, and then analyze the effect on R & D of changing that premium. Although patent protection is found to provide a positive premium on average in only a few industries, our results also imply that it stimulates R & D across almost all manufacturing industries, with the magnitude of that effect varying substantially
Firm size and R & D intensity : a re-examination by Wesley Marc Cohen( Book )

7 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using data from the Federal Trade Commission's Line of Business Program and survey measures of technological opportunity and appropriability conditions, this paper finds that overall firm size has a very small, statistically in- significant effect on business unit R & D intensity when either fixed industry effects or measured industry characteristics are taken into account. Business unit size has no effect on the R & D intensity of business units that perform R & D, but it affects the probability of conducting R & D. Business unit and firm size jointly explain less than one per cent of the variance in R & D intensity; industry effects explain nearly half the variance
What makes them tick? : employee motives and firm innovation by Henry Sauermann( Book )

8 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We examine the impact of individual-level motives upon innovative effort and performance in firms. Drawing from economics and social psychology, we develop a model of the impact of individuals' motives and incentives upon their innovative effort and performance. Using data on over 11,000 industrial scientists and engineers (SESTAT 2003), we find that individuals' motives have significant effects upon innovative effort and performance. These effects vary significantly, however, by the particular kind of motive (e.g., desire for intellectual challenge vs. pay). We also find that intrinsic and extrinsic motives affect innovative performance even when controlling for effort, suggesting that motives affect not only the level of individual effort, but also its quality. Overall, intrinsic motives, particularly the desire for intellectual challenge, appear to benefit innovation more than extrinsic motives such as pay
Firm size versus diversity in the achievement of technological advance by Wesley Marc Cohen( Book )

3 editions published in 1990 in English and German and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Empirical studies of innovation and market structure by Wesley Marc Cohen( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Firm size and R&D intensity : a re-examination by Wesley M Cohen( Book )

3 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Firm heterogeneity, investment, and industry expansion : a theoretical framework and the case of the uranium industry by Wesley Marc Cohen( )

2 editions published in 1984 in Undetermined and English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Incomplete markets, intra-industry firm heterogeneity and investment : the case of uranium exploration by Wesley Marc Cohen( Book )

1 edition published in 1990 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Firm size versus diversity in the achievement of technological advance by Wesley Marc Cohen( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Absorptive capacity : a new perspective on learning and innovation by Wesley Marc Cohen( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in Undetermined and English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Innovation and learning the two faces of R & D by W.M Cohen( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

R&D and the patent premium by Ashish Arora( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

We analyze the effect of patenting on R&D with a model linking a firm's R&D effort with its decision to patent, recognizing that R&D and patenting affect one another and are both driven by many of the same factors. Using survey data for the U.S. manufacturing sector, we estimate the increment to the value of an innovation realized by patenting it, and then analyze the effect on R&D of changing that premium. Although patent protection is found to provide a positive premium on average in only a few industries, our results also imply that it stimulates R&D across almost all manufacturing industries, with the magnitude of that effect varying substantially
Netflix : designing the Netflix Prize (A) by Karim R Lakhani( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"In 2006, Reed Hastings, CEO of Netflix, was looking for a way to solve Netflix's customer churn problem. Netflix used Cinematch, its proprietary movie recommendation software, to promote individually determined best-fit movies to customers. Hastings determined that a 10% improvement to the Cinematch algorithm would decrease customer churn and increase annual revenue by up to $89 million. However, traditional options for improving the algorithm, such as hiring and training new employees, were time intensive and costly. Hastings decided to improve Netflix's software by crowdsourcing, and began planning the Netflix Prize, an open contest searching for a 10% improvement on Cinematch. The case examines the dilemmas Hastings faced as he planned the contest, such as whether to use an existing crowdsourcing platform or create his own, what company information to expose, how to protect customer privacy while making internal datasets public, how to allocate IP, and how to manage the crowd."--Publisher's website
Firm size and R and D intensity: a re-examination by Wesley Marc Cohen( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Reforming the global IPR system to promote public goods by TRIPS Conference( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Panel discussion on the global intellectual property rights system and the promotion of public goods. Includes the following short lectures: John Barton, "Reforming the International Patent System" ; Pamela Samuelson and Suzanne Scotchmer, "IPR for Information Technologies" ; and Timothy Swanson, "The Economics of Biotechnology and IPR."
Engine Or infrastrucuture? The university role in economic development by Richard L Florida( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Acquisition and Commercialization of Invention in American Manufacturing Incidence and Impact by Ashish Arora( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recent accounts suggest the development and commercialization of invention has become more "open." Greater division of labor between inventors and innovators can enhance social welfare through gains from trade and greater economies of specialization. Moreover, this extensive reliance upon outside sources for invention also suggests that understanding the factors that condition the extramural supply of inventions to innovators is crucial to understanding the determinants of the rate and direction of innovative activity. This paper reports on a recent survey of over 6000 American manufacturing and service sector firms on the extent to which innovators rely upon external sources of invention. Our results indicate that, between 2007 and 2009, 18% of manufacturing firms had innovated - meaning had introduced a product that was new to the market. Of these, 49% report that their most important new product had originated from an outside source, notably customers, suppliers and technology specialists. We also estimate the contribution of each source to innovation in the US economy. Although customers are the most frequent outside source, inventions acquired from customers tend to be economically less significant than those from technology specialists. As a group, external sources of invention make a significant contribution to the overall rate of innovation in the economy. Indeed, results from a multinomial logit model suggest that, were the outside availability of innovation to be removed, the percentage of innovating firms in the U.S. manufacturing sector would drop from 18% to 10%
Lens or prism? : patent citations as a measure of knowledge flows from public research by Michael Wayne Roach( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper assesses the validity and accuracy of firms' backward patent citations as a measure of knowledge flows from public research by employing a newly constructed dataset that matches patents to survey data at the level of the R & D lab. Using survey-based measures of the dimensions of knowledge flows, we identify sources of systematic measurement error associated with backward citations to both patent and nonpatent references. We find that patent citations reflect the codified knowledge flows from public research, but they appear to miss knowledge flows that are more private and contract-based in nature, as well as those used in firm basic research. We also find that firms' patenting and citing strategies affect patent citations, making citations less indicative of knowledge flows. In addition, an illustrative analysis examining the magnitude and direction of measurement error bias suggests that measuring knowledge flows with patent citations can lead to substantial underestimation of the effect of public research on firms' innovative performance. Throughout our analyses we find that nonpatent references (e.g., journals, conferences, etc.), not the more commonly used patent references, are a better measure of knowledge originating from public research
 
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Patents in the knowledge-based economy
Languages
English (68)

German (1)

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