WorldCat Identities

Kotkin, Stephen

Overview
Works: 84 works in 372 publications in 3 languages and 14,526 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Case studies  Biographies  Sources  Pamphlets  Juvenile works  Caricatures and cartoons  Popular works  Illustrated works 
Roles: Author, Editor, Creator, Contributor, Other
Classifications: HX39.5, 335.422
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Stephen Kotkin
Armageddon averted : the Soviet collapse, 1970-2000 by Stephen Kotkin( Book )

38 editions published between 2001 and 2015 in English and held by 2,435 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In the Cold War era that dominated the second half of the twentieth century, nobody envisaged that the collapse of the Soviet Union would come from within, still less that it would happen meekly, without global conflagration. In this compact book Stephen Kotkin shows that the Soviet collapse resulted not from military competition but, ironically, from the dynamism of Communist ideology, the long-held dream for 'socialism with a human face'. The neo-liberal reforms in post-Soviet Russia never took place, nor could they have, given the Soviet-era inheritance in the social, political, and economic landscape." "Kotkin takes us deep into post-Stalin Soviet society and institutions, into the everyday hopes and secret political intrigues that affected 285 million people. He conveys the multiple ironies and unintended consequences of perestroika, and the high drama of a superpower falling apart while still armed to the teeth with millions of loyal troops and tens of thousands of weapons of mass destruction."--Jacket
Magnetic mountain : Stalinism as a civilization by Stephen Kotkin( )

34 editions published between 1995 and 2005 in 3 languages and held by 1,885 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When Bolshevik reformers descended on the five hills containing valuable iron-ore deposits, they tranformed the rural area into "Magnetic Mountain City"--An urban settlement praised for its ability to sustain the industrialization and political organization of the Communist doctrine. The resulting community stood as an example of how Communism, and Stalinist Communism in particular, could change rural agrarian society
Manchurian railways and the opening of China : an international history by Bruce A Elleman( )

12 editions published between 2009 and 2015 in English and held by 1,848 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The railways of Manchuria offer an intriguing vantage point for an international history of northeast Asia. Before the completion of the Trans-Siberian railway in 1916, the only rail route from the Imperial Russian capital of St. Petersburg to the Pacific port of Vladivostok transited Manchuria. A spur line from the Manchurian city of Harbin led south to ice-free Port Arthur. Control of these two rail lines gave Imperial Russia military, economic, and political advantages that excited rivalry on the part of Japan and unease on the part of weak and divided China. Meanwhile, the effort to defend
Beijing's power and China's borders : twenty neighbors in Asia by Bruce A Elleman( )

15 editions published between 2012 and 2015 in English and held by 1,481 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"China shares borders with 20 neighboring countries--more than any other country in the world, by a factor of two. Each of the neighbors has its own national interests, and in some cases, that includes territorial and maritime jurisdictional claims in places that China also claims. Most of these 20 countries have had a history of border conflicts with China; some of them never amicably settled. This book brings together some of the foremost historians, geographers, political scientists, and legal scholars on modern Asia to examine each of China's twenty land or sea borders. The alphabetically arranged chapters cover Afghanistan, Bhutan, Brunei, Indonesia, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Pakistan, The Philippines, Russia, Taiwan, Tajikistan, and Vietnam. Each chapter details the history and status of boundary setting and the ongoing management of transnational interactions--trade, resource exploitation, fishing rights, and population movements. An introduction and a concluding chapter draw out the implications of the book's twenty case studies. Issues examined include: the early history of setting the border with China; the ways in which China has acquired "new" boundaries as a result of changes in the international law of the sea; the type and intensity of China's border conflicts with its neighbors; successful efforts to delimit official borders; unsuccessful efforts to delimit borders; and areas where future border disputes could arise"--
Steeltown, USSR : Soviet society in the Gorbachev era by Stephen Kotkin( Book )

17 editions published between 1991 and 1992 in English and held by 1,257 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kotkin offers the reader an unsurpassed portrait of daily life in the Gorbachev era. From the formation of "informal" political groups to the start-up of fledgling businesses in the new cooperative sector, from the no-holds-barred investigative reporting of a former Communist party mouthpiece to a freewheeling multicandidate election campaign, the author conveys the texture of contemporary Soviet society in the throes of an upheaval not seen since the 1930s
Stalin by Stephen Kotkin( Book )

in English and held by 926 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A magnificent new biography that revolutionizes our understanding of Stalin and his world. It has the quality of myth: a poor cobbler's son, a seminarian from an oppressed outer province of the Russian empire, reinvents himself as a top leader in a band of revolutionary zealots. When the band seizes control of the country in the aftermath of total world war, the former seminarian ruthlessly dominates the new regime until he stands as absolute ruler of a vast and terrible state apparatus, with dominion over Eurasia. While still building his power base within the Bolshevik dictatorship, he embarks upon the greatest gamble of his political life and the largest program of social reengineering ever attempted: the collectivization of all agriculture and industry across one sixth of the earth. Millions will die, and many more millions will suffer, but the man will push through to the end against all resistance and doubts. Where did such power come from? In Stalin, Stephen Kotkin offers a biography that, at long last, is equal to this shrewd, sociopathic, charismatic dictator in all his dimensions. The character of Stalin emerges as both astute and blinkered, cynical and true believing, people oriented and vicious, canny enough to see through people but prone to nonsensical beliefs. We see a man inclined to despotism who could be utterly charming, a pragmatic ideologue, a leader who obsessed over slights yet was a precocious geostrategic thinker--unique among Bolsheviks--and yet who made egregious strategic blunders. Through it all, we see Stalin's unflinching persistence, his sheer force of will--perhaps the ultimate key to understanding his indelible mark on history. Stalin gives an intimate view of the Bolshevik regime's inner geography of power, bringing to the fore fresh materials from Soviet military intelligence and the secret police. Kotkin rejects the inherited wisdom about Stalin's psychological makeup, showing us instead how Stalin's near paranoia was fundamentally political, and closely tracks the Bolshevik revolution's structural paranoia, the predicament of a Communist regime in an overwhelmingly capitalist world, surrounded and penetrated by enemies. At the same time, Kotkin demonstrates the impossibility of understanding Stalin's momentous decisions outside of the context of the tragic history of imperial Russia. The product of a decade of intrepid research, Stalin is a landmark achievement, a work that recasts the way we think about the Soviet Union, revolution, dictatorship, the twentieth century, and indeed the art of history itself"--
Uncivil society : 1989 and the implosion of the communist establishment by Stephen Kotkin( Book )

16 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 842 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Berlin Wall fell in 1989. In one of history's most miraculous occurrences, communism imploded--not with a bang, but with a whimper. Now two scholars of Eastern European and Soviet affairs revisit what happened, in this fresh, incisive look at communism's collapse
Stalin : waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941 by Stephen Kotkin( Book )

7 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 533 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1929, Joseph Stalin, having already achieved dictatorial power over the vast Soviet Empire, formally ordered the systematic conversion of the world's largest peasant economy into "socialist modernity," otherwise known as collectivization, regardless of the cost. What it cost, and what Stalin ruthlessly enacted, transformed the country and its ruler in profound and enduring ways. Building and running a dictatorship, with life and death power over hundreds of millions, made Stalin into the uncanny figure he became. The wholesale collectivization of some 120 million peasants necessitated levels of coercion that were extreme even for Russia, and the resulting mass starvation elicited criticism inside the party even from those Communists committed to the eradication of capitalism. But Stalin did not flinch. By 1934, when the Soviet Union had stabilized and socialism had been implanted in the countryside, praise for his stunning anti-capitalist success came from all quarters. Stalin, however, never forgave and never forgot, with shocking consequences as he strove to consolidate the state with a brand new elite of young strivers like himself. Stalin's obsessions drove him to execute nearly a million people, including the military leadership, diplomatic and intelligence officials, and innumerable leading lights in culture. While Stalin revived a great power, building a formidable industrialized military, the Soviet Union was effectively alone and surrounded by perceived enemies. The quest for security would bring Soviet Communism to a shocking and improbable pact with Nazi Germany. But that bargain would not unfold as envisioned. The lives of Stalin and Hitler, and the fates of their respective dictatorships, drew ever closer to collision, as the world hung in the balance
Stalin by Stephen Kotkin( Book )

15 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 456 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In his biography of Stalin, Kotkin rejects the inherited wisdom about Stalin's psychological makeup, showing us instead how Stalin's near paranoia was fundamentally political and closely tracks the Bolshevik revolution's structural paranoia, the predicament of a Communist regime in an overwhelmingly capitalist world, surrounded and penetrated by enemies. At the same time, Kotkin posits the impossibility of understanding Stalin's momentous decisions outside of the context of the history of imperial Russia
Behind the Urals, an American worker in Russia's city of steel by John Scott( Book )

12 editions published between 1989 and 2010 in English and French and held by 404 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

John Scott's classic account of his five years as a worker in the new industrial city of Magnitogorsk in the 1930s, first published in 1942, is enhanced in this edition by Stephen Kotkin's introduction, which places the book in context for today's readers; by the texts of three debriefings of Scott conducted at the U.S. embassy in Moscow in 1938 and published here for the first time; and by a selection of photographs showing life in Magnitogorsk in the 1930s. No other book provides such a graphic description of the life of workers under the First Five-Year Plan
Mongolia in the twentieth century : landlocked cosmopolitan by Stephen Kotkin( Book )

14 editions published between 1999 and 2015 in English and held by 377 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume examines Mongol history over the twentieth century, embracing not only Mongolia proper but also Mongol communities in Russia and China. The contributions are by authors from Japan, Russia, Taiwan, Great Britain and the United States
Rediscovering Russia in Asia : Siberia and the Russian Far East by Stephen Kotkin( Book )

15 editions published between 1995 and 2015 in English and held by 369 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1581 a Cossack raider crossed the Ural Mountains to plunder and claim for Tsar Ivan IV the land called "Sibir" by its Tatar inhabitants. Within half a century, Moscow's reach would extend nearly six thousand miles to the east. Thus Russia has a long history as part of Asia. Does it have a future there as well? Rediscovering Russia in Asia takes the reader on a trans-Siberian expedition to encounter the peoples, cultures, and riches of Russia's eastern expanses. The expert guides are scholars with the language skills and the sense of adventure to explore a "crossroads of civilizations" at long last reopened to the world
The cultural gradient : the transmission of ideas in Europe, 1789-1991 by Catherine Evtuhov( Book )

11 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and held by 288 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Is there a sharp dividing line that separates Europe into 'East' and 'West'? This volume brings together prominent scholars from the United States, Canada, France, Poland, and Russia to examine the evolution of the concept of Europe in the two centuries between the French Revolution and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Inspired by the ideas of Martin Malia, the contributors take a flexible view of the 'cultural gradient'_the emergence, interaction, and reception of ideas across Europe
Historical legacies of communism in Russia and Eastern Europe by Mark R Beissinger( )

11 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 259 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book takes stock of arguments about the historical legacies of communism that have become common within the study of Russia and East Europe more than two decades after communism's demise and elaborates an empirical approach to the study of historical legacies revolving around relationships and mechanisms rather than correlation and outward similarities. Eleven essays by a distinguished group of scholars assess whether post-communist developments in specific areas continue to be shaped by the experience of communism or, alternatively, by fundamental divergences produced before or after communism. Chapters deal with the variable impact of the communist experience on post-communist societies in such areas as regime trajectories and democratic political values; patterns of regional and sectoral economic development; property ownership within the energy sector; the functioning of the executive branch of government, the police, and courts; the relationship of religion to the state; government language policies; and informal relationships and practices"--
Political corruption in transition : a skeptic's handbook( Book )

12 editions published between 2002 and 2008 in English and held by 207 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book is a comparative review of corruption during the transition from Communism. Based on two international conferences at Princeton University and the Central European University, it acts as a guide to the problem of corruption in transition countries. This book represents a realistic view
Capital, the Communist manifesto, and other writings by Karl Marx( Book )

4 editions published between 2011 and 2014 in English and held by 151 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The political tract in which Marx presented the core of his philosophy and revolutionary program, with an introduction analyzing its significance to the realities of today and to Marx's own times
Stalin by Stephen Kotkin( Book )

19 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and Undetermined and held by 137 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This biography restores a sense of surprise, even wonder, to the way we think about Stalin, the 20th century, revolution, and indeed the art of history itself. The product of a decade of scrupulous and intrepid research, 'Stalin' contains a host of astonishing revelations. Kotkin gives an intimate view of the Bolshevik regime's inner geography, bringing to the fore materials from Soviet military intelligence and the secret police. He explains how chaos from revolution and civil war became a permanent feature of Soviet administration, even as the regime and Stalin acquired ever more power. The book details Stalin's invention of a fabricated trial and mass executions as early as 1918, the technique he would later impose across the whole country. It places Stalin's momentous decision for collectivization more deeply than ever in the tragic history of imperial Russia
Stalin by Stephen Kotkin( Recording )

3 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 116 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In his biography of Stalin, Kotkin rejects the inherited wisdom about Stalin's psychological makeup, showing us instead how Stalin's near paranoia was fundamentally political and closely tracks the Bolshevik revolution's structural paranoia, the predicament of a Communist regime in an overwhelmingly capitalist world, surrounded and penetrated by enemies. At the same time, Kotkin posits the impossibility of understanding Stalin's momentous decisions outside of the context of the history of imperial Russia.--
Stalin by Stephen Kotkin( )

14 editions published between 2014 and 2017 in English and Italian and held by 87 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A magnificent new biography that revolutionizes our understanding of Stalin and his world. It has the quality of myth: a poor cobbler's son, a seminarian from an oppressed outer province of the Russian empire, reinvents himself as a top leader in a band of revolutionary zealots. When the band seizes control of the country in the aftermath of total world war, the former seminarian ruthlessly dominates the new regime until he stands as absolute ruler of a vast and terrible state apparatus, with dominion over Eurasia. While still building his power base within the Bolshevik dictatorship, he embarks upon the greatest gamble of his political life and the largest program of social reengineering ever attempted: the collectivization of all agriculture and industry across one sixth of the earth. Millions will die, and many more millions will suffer, but the man will push through to the end against all resistance and doubts."--
Stalin : Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941 by Stephen Kotkin( Recording )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 56 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pulitzer Prize-finalist Stephen Kotkin continues his definitive biography of Stalin, from collectivization and the Great Terror through to the coming of the conflict with Hitler's Germany that is the signal event of modern world history. As the shadows of the 30's deepen, Stalin's drive to militarize Soviet society takes on increasing urgency, and the ambition of Nazi Germany becomes the predominant geopolitical reality he faces when Hitler claims that communism is a global "Judeo-Bolshevik" conspiracy to bring the Slavic race to power. Stalin's paranoia is increasingly one of the most horrible facts of life for his entire country. Stalin's obsessions drive him to violently purge almost a million people, including military leadership, diplomatic corps and intelligence apparatus, to say nothing of a generation of artistic talent. And then came the pact that shocked the world, and demoralized leftists everywhere: Stalin's pact with Hitler in 1939, the carve-up of Poland, and Stalin's utter inability to see Hitler's build-up to the invasion of the USSR. Yet for all that, in just 12 years of total power, Stalin has taken this country from a peasant economy to a formidable modern war machine that rivaled anything else in the world. When the invasion came, Stalin wasn't ready, but his country would prove to be prepared
 
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Armageddon averted : the Soviet collapse, 1970-2000
Covers
Magnetic mountain : Stalinism as a civilizationManchurian railways and the opening of China : an international historySteeltown, USSR : Soviet society in the Gorbachev eraUncivil society : 1989 and the implosion of the communist establishmentBehind the Urals, an American worker in Russia's city of steelMongolia in the twentieth century : landlocked cosmopolitanRediscovering Russia in Asia : Siberia and the Russian Far EastThe cultural gradient : the transmission of ideas in Europe, 1789-1991
Alternative Names
Kotkin, Stephen 1959-

Kotkin, Stephen M. 1959-

Kotkin, Stephen Mark 1959-

Kotkin, Stiven 1959-

Stephen Kotkin Amerikaans historicus

Stephen Kotkin historiador estadounidense

Коткин, Стив американский историк

Стивън Коткин

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Languages
English (265)

Italian (2)

French (1)