WorldCat Identities

Micali, Silvio

Overview
Works: 28 works in 41 publications in 2 languages and 96 library holdings
Classifications: QA274,
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Silvio Micali Publications about Silvio Micali
Publications by  Silvio Micali Publications by Silvio Micali
Most widely held works by Silvio Micali
Randomness and computation ( Book )
4 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
An optimal algorithm for synchronous Byzantine agreement by Paul Neil Feldman ( Book )
4 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
How to sign given any trapdoor permutation by Mihir Bellare ( Book )
2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
An autoimmune mechanism for AIDS' T4 lymphopenia by Silvio Micali ( Book )
3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstract: "We put forward a new model for the T4 lymphopenia occurring in AIDS. In essence, we present a mechanism whose net effect is blocking the generation of T4 cells during HIV infection. Supporting evidence for our mechanism is derived from experiments in the recent literature."
How to construct random functions by Oded Goldreich ( Book )
1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Universal boolean judges and their characterization by Eyal Kushilevitz ( Book )
1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstract: "We consider the classic problem of n honest (but curious) players will private inputs x₁ ..., x[subscript n] who wish to compute the value of some pre-determined function f(x₁ ..., x[subscript n]), so that at the end of the protocol every player knows the value of f(x₁ ..., x[subscript n]). The players have unbounded computational resources and they wish to compute f in a totally private (n-private) way. That is, after the completion of the protocol, which all players honestly follow, no coalition (of arbitrary size) can infer any information about the private inputs of the remaining players above of what is already been revealed by the value of f(x₁ ..., x[subscript n]). Of course, with the help of a trusted judge for computing f, players can trivially compute f in a totally private manner: every player secretly gives his input to the trusted judge and she announces the result. Previous research was directed towards implementing such a judge 'mentally' by the players themselves, and was shown possible under various assumptions. Without assumptions, however, it was shown that most functions can not be computed in a totally private manner and thus we must rely on a trusted judge. If we have a trusted judge for f we are done. Can we use a judge for a 'simpler' function g in order to compute f n-privately? In this paper we initiate the study of the complexity of such judges needed to achieve total privacy for arbitrary f. We answer the following two questions: How complicated such a judge should be, compared to f? and Does there exists [sic] some judge which can be used for all f? We show that there exists universal boolean judges (i.e. the ones that can be used for any f) and give a complete characterization of all the boolean functions which describe universal judges. In fact, we show, that a judge computing any boolean function g which itself cannot be computed n-privately (i.e., when there is no judge available) is universal. Thus, we show that for all boolean functions, the notions of universality and n-privacy are complimentary. On the other hand, for non-boolean functions, we show that this [sic] two notions are not complimentary. Our result can be viewed as a strong generalization of the two-party case, where Oblivious Transfer protocols were shown to be universal."
Any non-private boolean function is complete for private multi- party computations by Eyal Kushilevitz ( Book )
2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstract: "Let g be an n-argument boolean function. Suppose we are given a black-box for g, to which n honest-but-curious players can secretly give inputs and it broadcasts the result of operating g on all these inputs to all the players. We say that g is complete (for multi- party private computations) if for every function f, the n players can compute the function f n-privately, given the black-box for g. In this paper, we characterize the boolean functions which are complete: we show that a boolean function g is complete if and only if g itself cannot be computed n-privately (when there is no black-box available). Namely, for boolean functions, the notions of completeness and n-privacy are complementary. On the other hand, for non-boolean functions, we show that this [sic] two notions are not complementary. Our result can be viewed as a generalization (for multi-party protocols and for (n [> or =] 2)-argument functions) of the two-party case, where it was known that two-argument functions which contain 'embedded-OR' are complete."
Secure computation : preliminaty report by Silvio Micali ( Book )
1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Randomness versus hardness by Silvio Micali ( Book )
1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Removing interaction from zero-knowledge proofs by Alfredo De Santis ( Book )
1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Tavole di Diritto Romano by Silvio Micali ( Book )
2 editions published in 1941 in Italian and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Fair cryptosystems by Silvio Micali ( Book )
1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstract: "There is a growing concern that the wide use of encryption may be more dangerous than helpful to society. In particular, good encryption schemes make court-authorized line-tapping, an effective tool for law enforcement, impossible. Addressing this concern, we show how to construct cryptosystems in a fair way, that is, so as to allow a democratic country to strike the desired balance between the needs of the Government and those of the Citizens. Fair cryptosystems enjoy the following properties: (1) they cannot be misused by criminal organizations and (2) they guarantee to the Citizens exactly the same rights to privacy they currently have under the law. We actually show how to transform any cryptosystem into a fair one. The transformed systems preserve the security and efficiency of the original ones. Thus one can still use whatever system he believes to be more secure, and enjoy the additional properties of fairness. Moreover, for today's best known cryptosystems, our transformation is particularly efficient and convenient. Our solution compares favorably with the Clipper Chip, the encryption proposal more recently put forward by the Clinton Administration for solving similar problems. In particular, our solution (a) allows citizens to choose whatever algorithms they prefer and all of their secret keys, (b) can be efficiently and securely implemented in software, and (c) ensures that any court-authorized line-tapping ends at the prescribed time."
Non-interactive zero-knowledge with preprocessing by Alfredo De Santis ( Book )
1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Proofs that yield nothing but their validity or all languages in NP have zero-knowledge proofs : Revised version of TR 498 by Oded Goldreich ( Book )
3 editions published between 1989 and 1990 in English and Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
CS proofs by Massachusetts Institute of Technology ( Book )
1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Efficient, perfect polynomial random number generators by Silvio Micali ( )
1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
An optimal probabilistic protocol for synchronous Byzantine agreement by Paul Neil Feldman ( Book )
1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Perfect implementation by Sergei Izmalkov ( )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Enhanced certificate revocation system by Massachusetts Institute of Technology ( Book )
1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Non-interactive zero knowledge ( Book )
1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
We investigate the possibility of disposing of interaction between Prover and Verifier in a zero-knowledge proof if they share beforehand a short random string. Without any assumption, we prove that non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs exist for some number theoretic languages for which no efficient algorithm is known. If deciding quadratic residuosity (modulo composite integers whose factorization is not known) is computationally hard, we show that the NP-complete language of satisfiability also possesses non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs
 
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.79 (from 0.10 for Efficient, ... to 1.00 for Randomness ...)
Languages
English (30)
Italian (2)