WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:11:49 2014 UTClccn-n886194240.00Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) Version 40.781.00DOD standard transmission control protocol /52548963Jon_Posteln 886194242227866Postel, J. (Jonathan), 1943-1998Postel, Jon, 1943-1988Postel, Jonathan 1943-1998nc-sri international$network information centerSRI InternationalNetwork Information Centerlccn-n80165385United StatesDefense Communications Agencylccn-n89642602Feinler, Elizabeth J.nc-stanford research institute$network information centerStanford Research InstituteNetwork Information Centernp-crocker, david hCrocker, David H.nc-university of southern california marina del rey information sciences instUNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MARINA DEL REY INFORMATION SCIENCES INSTnc-university of southern california$information sciences instituteUniversity of Southern CaliforniaInformation Sciences Institutelccn-no94015684United StatesDefense Advanced Research Projects AgencyInformation Processing Techniques Officenp-mockapetris, paul vMockapetris, Paul V.np-schooler, eve mSchooler, Eve M.Postel, Jonathan Bruce1943-1998Computer networksData transmission systemsARPANET (Computer network)Computer network protocolsTelecommunication systemsCommunication--Mathematical modelsSystem analysisNetwork analysis (Planning)Model theoryElectronic mail systemsDigital communicationsDatabase managementElectronic data processing--Distributed processingMultimedia systemsComputer programsComputersComputer architectureBaran, PaulScienceKleinrock, LeonardRoberts, LarryInternet service providersUnited StatesBerners-Lee, TimInternet1943199819741976197719781979198019811982198319841985198619871990199119941997762941355.002854404U393.5169ocn002290635book19740.90Postel, Jonathan BruceA graph model analysis of computer communications protocolsThe large scale computer networks being constructed demand that for effective utilization, protocols be established to regulate the communications between the attached computer systems. Assurance that these communications protocols are well behaved (e.g. do not deadlock) must be achieved. This report focuses on the analysis of computer-to-computer communications protocols using graph modeling techniques. Computer-to-computer communications protocols are examined and the issues of error control, flow control, multiplexing, and synchronization are identified and discussed. A sample protocol is developed. The UCLA Graph Model is explained and used to model and analyze the sample protocol. The ARPANET Initial Connection Protocol is also modeled and analyzed with significant results. The concept of a graph module is introduced. Graph modules are defined and used to simplify the model of the sample protocol. (Author)112ocn002817630book19760.88ARPANET protocol handbook71ocn011415782book19820.73Internet mail protocols51ocn011413527book19830.47Internet Telenet protocol and options52ocn008798594book19801.00DOD standard transmission control protocolThe Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is intended for use as a highly reliable host-to-host protocol between hosts in packet-switched computer communication networks, and especially in interconnected systems of such networks. This document describes the functions to be performed by the Transmission Control Protocol, the program that implements it, and its interface to programs or users that require its services. Computer communication systems are playing an increasingly important role in military, government, and civilian environments. This document primarily focuses its attention on military computer communication requirements, especially robustness in the presence of communication unreliability and availability in the presence of congestion, but many of these problems are found in the civilian and government sector as well. As strategic and tactical computer communication networks are developed and deployed, it is essential to provide means of interconnecting them and to provide standard interprocess communication protocols which can support a broad range of applications42ocn008798583book19801.00DoD Standard Internet ProtocolThe Internet Protocol is designed for use in interconnected systems of packet-switched computer communication networks. Such as system has been called a 'catenet'. The internet protocol provides for transmitting blocks of data called datagrams from sources to destinations, where sources and destinations are hosts identified by fixed length addresses. The internet protocol also provides for fragmentation and reassembly of long datagrams, if necessary, for transmission through 'small packet' networks. This document is based on five earlier editions of the ARPA Internet Protocol Specification, and the present text draws heavily from them. There have been many contributors to this work both in terms of concepts and in terms of text. This edition revises the details security, compartmentation, and precedence features of the internet protocol. (Author)31ocn017826152book19860.81Postel, Jonathan BruceThe ISI experimental multimedia mail system21ocn003477551book19761.00Postel, Jonathan BruceGraph Modeling of computer communications protocols21ocn071503326book19830.92Cohen, DannyThe ISO reference model and other protocol architectures21ocn018006469book19850.47Mockapetris, Paul VA perspective on name system design21ocn031184133book19910.47Schooler, Eve MMultimedia conferencing : has it come of age?Abstract: "Multimedia conferencing continues to be an active research area with a diversity of systems being developed for a variety of situations. In particular, multimedia conferencing is central to the idea of the Collaboratory, an electronic environment for conducting science. As a vehicle for telecollaboration, multimedia conferencing promises to provide a meeting place for those needing to work cooperatively from afar. This paper reviews current research projects in telecollaboration. We first frame the discussion of multimedia conferencing with a nomenclature and taxonomy. We compare local versus remote conferencing, touching on issues in system architecture and network communications requirements. We then examine the recurring problems researchers have observed and the solutions they have chosen21ocn071504836book19840.92Mockapetris, Paul VName server design for distributed systemsName servers are programs that provide a uniform method of naming resources and retrieving information about those resources in the context of a distributed system. This paper examines the main issues in name server design and considers some contemporary name servers in order to classify the common goals, methods, and tradeoffs. (Author)11ocn123337250book19940.47Thomas J. Watson IBM Research CenterRouter arbiter overview11ocn838702852book19840.47Postel, Jonathan BruceDomain Name System implementation schedule11ocn024861523book19761.00Postel, Jonathan BruceTerminal-to-Host Protocol SpecificationThis is the specification of the Terminal-to-Host Protocol (THP) which serves as both the terminal-to-terminal and terminal-to-process protocol for the AUTODIN II network. The AUTODIN II system provides the capability for geographically distributed computers, called hosts, to communicate with each other. The hosts are a diverse set of computers of differing manufacture, speed, word size, and operating system. The AUTODIN II system provides a mechanism for communication between hosts, the Transmission Control Protocol (THP) specifies how the hosts use this mechanism to provide communication services to processes, and finally, the THP provides a mechanism for offering services to human users. The reader of this document is assumed to be familiar with the concepts of the AUTODIN II system, TCP, and operating system concepts. In particular, the reader is expected to have read the AUTODIN II Specification and the TCP Specification. It is intended that the information presented here be sufficiently complete enough to allow a competent system programmer to implement a program module to carry out this protocol. This document draws heavily from the ARPA Network protocol documents on the Telnet Protocol. We wish to acknowledge the efforts of the many contributors to that collection. (Author)11ocn248220895book19810.47Internet protocol : DARPA Internet Program protocol specification11ocn227406251file1979Internet Datagram Protocol Specification. Version 4The Internet Protocol is designed for use in interconnected systems of packet-switched computer communication networks. Such a system has been called a 'catenet'. The internet protocol provides for transmitting blocks of data called datagrams from sources to destinations, where sources and destinations are hosts identified by fixed length addresses. The internet protocol also provides for fragmentation and reassembly of long datagrams, if necessary, for transmission through 'small packet' networks. The internet protocol is specifically limited in scope to provide the functions necessary to deliver a package of bits (an internet datagram) from a source to a destination over an interconnected system of networks. There are no mechanisms to promote data reliability, flow control, sequencing, or other services commonly found in host-to-host protocols. This protocol is called on by host-to-host protocols in an internet environment. This protocol calls on local network protocols to carry the internet packet to the next gateway or destination host11ocn838702576book19810.47Transmission Control Protocol : DARPA internet program ; protocol specification11ocn123337248book19940.47Thomas J. Watson IBM Research CenterRouting arbiter architecture11ocn227404376book1979Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) Version 4The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is intended for use as a highly reliable host-to-host protocol between hosts in packet-switched computer communication networks, and especially in interconnected systems of such networks. This document describes the functions to be performed by the Transmission Control Protocol, the program that implements it, and its interface to programs or users that require its services11ocn122332818mix19970.47Lythcott-Haims, DanA History of the Internet, 1962-1992 :HistoryIncludes a time-line of key events, together with graphics and portraitsFri Mar 21 15:22:55 EDT 2014batch15293