WorldCat Identities

Woodworth, Steven E.

Overview
Works: 67 works in 276 publications in 1 language and 26,193 library holdings
Genres: History  Catalogs  Bibliography  Sources  Personal narratives  Maps  Guidebooks  Military history  Biography  Case studies 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: E467.1.D26, 973.7
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Steven E Woodworth
The American Civil War a handbook of literature and research by Steven E Woodworth( )
11 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 1,909 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The single most important volume for anyone interested in the Civil War to own and consult. (From the foreword by James M. McPherson) The first guide to Civil War literature to appear in nearly 30 years, this book provides the most comprehensive, up-to-date, and informative survey and analysis of the vast body of Civil War literature. More than 40 essays, each by a specialist in a particular subfield of Civil War history, offer unmatched thoroughness and discerning assessments of each work's value. The essays cover every aspect of the war from strategy, tactics, and battles to logistics, intel
Jefferson Davis and his generals : the failure of Confederate command in the West by Steven E Woodworth( Book )
7 editions published between 1990 and 1992 in English and held by 1,602 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Examines the relationship of the Confederate generals with Jefferson Davis and each other, on and off the battlefield
The Shiloh campaign ( )
7 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 1,419 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This title provides new insights into the civil War's bloodiest battle. Steven E. Woodworth has brought together a group of historians to reassess this significant battle and provide in-depth analysis of key aspects of the campaign and its aftermath
Cultures in conflict--the American Civil War by Steven E Woodworth( )
6 editions published between 2000 and 2011 in English and held by 1,418 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The American Civil War was primarily a conflict of cultures, and slavery was the largest single cultural factor separating North and South. This collection of carefully selected memoirs, diaries, letters, and reminiscences of ordinary Northerners and Southerners who experienced the war as soldiers or civilians brings to life the conflict in culture, principles, attitudes, hopes, courage, and suffering of both sides. Woodworth, a Civil War historian, has selected a wide variety of moving first-person accounts. Each account tells a story of a life and reveals the attitudes of ordinary people and the real conditions of war - both in the field and on the homefront."--Jacket
Decision in the heartland the Civil War in the West by Steven E Woodworth( )
7 editions published between 2008 and 2011 in English and held by 1,393 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Presenting the case for the decisiveness of the Civil War's western theater, Woodworth provides a fast-paced overview of the conflict between the Appalachians and the Mississippi
Atlas of the Civil War by Steven E Woodworth( Book )
10 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 1,316 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Offering the clearest and most comprehensive examination of the conflict that transformed the United States, the Atlas of the Civil War reveals with surprising immediacy the numerous dimensions of this historic confrontation. Surpassing the scope of any previously published single-volume work, this atlas pairs expert scholarship with precise cartography to depict the ebb and flow of destruction and reconstruction." "Divided chronologically into five sections, the Atlas of the Civil War illustrated every significant battle and military campaign while simultaneously considering the important social themes that shaped the country during the same period."--BOOK JACKET
This great struggle : America's Civil War by Steven E Woodworth( Book )
11 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 1,230 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The author, a historian tells the story of what many regard as the defining event in United States history. Referring to the war that was raging across parts of the American landscape, Abraham Lincoln told Congress in 1862, "We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best hope on Earth." Lincoln recognized what was at stake in the American Civil War: not only freedom for 3.5 million slaves but also survival of self-government in the last place on Earth where it could have the opportunity of developing freely. While covering all theaters of war, he emphasizes the importance of action in the region between the Appalachians and the Mississippi River in determining its outcome. He argues that the Civil War had a distinct purpose that was understood by most of its participants: it was primarily a conflict over the issue of slavery. The soldiers who filled the ranks of the armies on both sides knew what they were fighting for. The outcome of the war-after its beginnings at Fort Sumter to the Confederate surrender four years later was the result of the actions and decisions made by those soldiers and millions of other Americans
No band of brothers problems in the rebel high command by Steven E Woodworth( )
10 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,166 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"In analyzing the Confederate leadership, Woodworth reveals some weaknesses, many strengths, and much new information. No Band of Brothers will be welcomed by professional historians, amateur historians, students, and the general reader alike."--Jacket
The Chickamauga campaign ( )
6 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 1,093 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"From mid-August to mid-September 1863, Union Major General William S. Rosecrans's Army of the Cumberland maneuvered from Tennessee to north Georgia in a bid to rout Confederate General Braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee and blaze the way for further Union advances. Meanwhile, Confederate reinforcements bolstered the numbers of the Army of Tennessee, and by the time the two armies met at the Battle of Chickamauga, in northern Georgia, the Confederates had gained numerical superiority. Although the Confederacy won its only major victory west of the Appalachians, it failed to achieve the truly decisive results many high-ranking Confederates expected. In The Chickamauga Campaign, Steven E. Woodworth assembles eight thought-provoking new essays from an impressive group of authors to offer new insight into the complex reasons for this substantial, yet ultimately barren, Confederate victory"--Jacket
Manifest destinies : America's westward expansion and the road to the Civil War by Steven E Woodworth( Book )
11 editions published between 2010 and 2013 in English and held by 1,053 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A sweeping history of the 1840s that captures America's enormous sense of possibility that inspired it's growth and shows how the extraordinary expansion of territories forced the nation to come to grips with the deep rift that would bring war just a decade later. The author gives us a portrait of America at its most vibrant and expansive. It was a decade in which the nation significantly enlarged its boundaries, taking Texas, New Mexico, California, and the Pacific Northwest; William Henry Harrison ran the first modern populist campaign, focusing on entertaining voters rather than on discussing issues; prospectors headed west to search for gold; Joseph Smith founded a new religion; railroads and telegraph lines connected the country's disparate populations as never before. When the 1840s dawned, Americans were feeling optimistic about the future: the population was growing, economic conditions were improving, and peace had reigned for nearly thirty years. A hopeful nation looked to the West, where vast areas of unsettled land seemed to promise prosperity to anyone resourceful enough to take advantage. And yet political tensions roiled below the surface; as the country took on new lands, slavery emerged as an irreconcilable source of disagreement between North and South, and secession reared its head for the first time. This book is an account of a crucial decade that forged a young nation's character and destiny
Shiloh a battlefield guide by Mark Grimsley( )
3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 1,011 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Peabody's Battle Line, McCuller's Field, Stuart's Defense, the Peach Orchard, and Hell's Hollow--these monuments mark some of the critical moments in the battle of Shiloh but offer the visitor only the most meager sense of what happened on the banks of the Tennessee in April 1862. This battlefield guide breathes life into Civil War history, giving readers a clear picture of the setting at the time of engagement, who was where, and when and how the battle progressed. Designed to lead the user on a one-day tour of one of the most important battlefields of the war, the guide provides precise directions to all the key locations in a manner reflecting how the battle itself unfolded. A wealth of maps, vivid descriptions, and careful but accessible analysis makes plain the sweep of events and the geography of the battlefield, enhancing the experience of Shiloh for the serious student, the casual visitor, and the armchair tourist alike
The Chattanooga Campaign ( )
5 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 937 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"When the Confederates emerged as victors in the Chickamauga Campaign, the Union Army of the Cumberland lay under siege in Chattanooga, with Braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee on nearby high ground at Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain. A win at Chattanooga was essential for the Confederates, both to capitalize on the victory at Chickamauga and to keep control of the gateway to the lower South. Should the Federal troops wrest control of that linchpin, they would cement their control of eastern Tennessee and gain access to the Deep South. In the fall 1863 Chattanooga Campaign, the new head of the western Union armies, Ulysses S. Grant, sought to break the Confederate siege. His success created the opportunity for the Union to start a campaign to capture Atlanta the following spring. Woodworth's introduction sets the stage for ten insightful essays that provide new analysis of this crucial campaign. From the Battle of Wauhatchie to the Battle of Chattanooga, the contributors' well-researched and vividly written assessments of both Union and Confederate actions offer a balanced discussion of the complex nature of the campaign and its aftermath. Other essays give fascinating examinations of the reactions to the campaign in northern newspapers and by Confederate soldiers from west of the Mississippi River. Complete with maps and photos, The Chattanooga Campaign contains a wealth of detailed information about the military, social, and political aspects of the campaign and contributes significantly to our understanding of the Civil War's western theater."--Project Muse
Davis and Lee at war by Steven E Woodworth( Book )
7 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 931 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In the critically acclaimed Jefferson Davis and His Generals Steven Woodworth showed how the failures of Davis and his military leaders in the West paved the way for Confederate defeat. In Davis and Lee at War he concludes his study of Davis as rebel commander-in-chief and shows how the lack of a unified purpose and strategy in the East sealed the Confederacy's fate. Woodworth argues that Davis and Robert E. Lee, the South's greatest military leader, had sharply conflicting views over the proper conduct of the war. Davis was convinced that the South should fight a defensive war, to simply outlast the North's political and popular support for the war. By contrast, Lee and the other eastern generals - notably P.G.T. Beauregard, Gustavus Smith, and Stonewall Jackson - were eager for the offensive. They were convinced that only quick and decisive battlefield victories would prevent the North from eventually defeating them with its overwhelming advantage in men and materials. The result of this tense tug-of-war was Davis's misguided pursuit of a middle ground that gave neither strategy its best chance for success
Nothing but victory : the Army of the Tennessee, 1861-1865 by Steven E Woodworth( Book )
10 editions published between 2005 and 2013 in English and held by 910 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Traces the history of the Union's Army of the Tennessee and its campaigns in the Civil War's western theater
Sherman by Steven E Woodworth( Book )
11 editions published between 2008 and 2010 in English and held by 903 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Explores the leadership strategies of William Tecumseh Sherman, a Union General in the American Civil War known for his unique maneuvering techniques, and discusses the impact that his actions had on history
This grand spectacle the battle of Chattanooga by Steven E Woodworth( )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 819 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Beneath a northern sky : a short history of the Gettysburg Campaign by Steven E Woodworth( Book )
9 editions published between 2003 and 2008 in English and held by 773 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Of all the places and events in this nation's history, Gettysburg may well be the name best known to Americans. In Beneath a Northern Sky, eminent Civil War historian Steven E. Woodworth offers a balanced and thorough overview of the entire battle, its drama, and its meaning. From Lee's decision to take his heretofore successful Army of Northern Virginia across the Potomac and into Pennsylvania to the withdrawal of the battle-battered Confederate's back across the river into Virginia, Wo
While God is marching on : the religious world of Civil War soldiers by Steven E Woodworth( Book )
7 editions published between 2001 and 2003 in English and held by 765 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
They read the same Bible and prayed to the same God, but they faced each other in battle with rage in their hearts. The Civil War not only pitted brother against brother but also Christian against Christian, with soldiers from North and South alike devoutly believing that God was on their side. Steven E. Woodworth, a Civil War historian, presents the first detailed study of soldiers'' religious beliefs and how they influenced the course of that tragic conflict. He shows how Christian teaching and practice shaped the worldview of soldiers on both sides: how it motivated them for the struggle, how it influenced he way they fought, and how it shaped national life after the war ended. Through the diaries, letters, ad reminiscences of common soldiers, Woodworth illuminates religious belief from the home front to the battlefield, where thoughts of death and the afterlife were always close at hand. Woodworth reveals what these men thought about God and what they believed God thought about the war
Civil War generals in defeat ( Book )
4 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 660 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Commanders who serve on the losing side of a battle, campaign, or war are often harshly viewed by posterity. Labeled as mere "losers," they go unrecognized for their very real abilities and achievements in other engagements. The writers in this volume challenge such simplistic notions. By looking more closely at Civil War generals who have borne the stigma of failure, these authors reject the reductionist view that significant defeats were due simply to poor generalship. Analyzing men who might be considered "capable failures"--Officers of high prewar reputation, some with distinguished records int eh Civil War--they examine the various reasons these men suffered defeat, whether flaws of character, errors of judgment, lack of preparation, or circumstances beyond their control. These seven case studies consider Confederate and Union generals evenhandedly. They show how Albert Sidney Johnston failed in the face of extreme conditions and inadequate support, how Joe Hooker and John C. Pemberton were outmatched in confrontations with Lee and Grant, how George B. McClellan in the Peninsula Campaign and Don Carlos Buell at Chattanooga faced political as well as military complications, and how Joseph E. Johnston failed to adapt to challenges in Virginia. An additional chapter looks at generals form both sides at the Battle of Gettysburg, showing how failure to adjust to circumstances can thwart even the most seasoned leader's expectations
Six armies in Tennessee : the Chickamauga and Chattanooga campaigns by Steven E Woodworth( Book )
5 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 517 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
That battle - indeed the entire campaign - is marked by muddle and blunders occasionally relieved by strokes of brilliant generalship and high courage. The campaign ended significant Confederate presence in Tennessee. It also left the Union poised for advance upon Atlanta and the Confederacy on the brink of defeat in the western theater
 
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Audience level: 0.35 (from 0.19 for Sherman / ... to 0.50 for The Chicka ...)
Languages
English (149)
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