WorldCat Identities

Moultrie, William 1730-1805

Overview
Works: 97 works in 175 publications in 1 language and 1,968 library holdings
Genres: History  Sermons  Personal narratives  Records and correspondence  Sources  Biography  Portraits  Prescriptions, formulae, receipts, etc 
Roles: Author
Classifications: E230.5.S7, 973.33
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  William Moultrie Publications about William Moultrie
Publications by  William Moultrie Publications by William Moultrie
posthumous Publications by William Moultrie, published posthumously.
Most widely held works about William Moultrie
 
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Most widely held works by William Moultrie
Memoirs of the American revolution by William Moultrie ( Book )
42 editions published between 1802 and 2004 in English and Undetermined and held by 1,119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Moultrie Montague letters, 1781 : some related matters by William Moultrie ( Book )
6 editions published in 1904 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The correspondence of Lord Montague with General Moultrie. 1781 by William Moultrie ( Book )
7 editions published in 1885 in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Moultrie-Montague letters, 1781 some related materials by William Moultrie ( Book )
1 edition published in 1904 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
TRANSMAP : a program for planar transformation of point distributions by Lawrence A Brown ( Book )
in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Original letters from Genl. Francis Marion and Genl. William Moultrie, 1781-1788 by Francis Marion ( )
in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
James Kershaw papers by James Kershaw ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Contains diary, 1791-1825, of James Kershaw, consisting of meteorological observations; recipes; and home remedies, featuring advice for treatment of pimples, boils, baldness, and unwanted hair. Papers recording observations, 17 Sept. 1811, of a solar eclipse; accounts of debts paid, January - April 1812, re prices of cotton, molasses, and sugar; and typed abstracts of recipes, 1936, copied from the diaries
Autographs of the Generals of the American Revolution : ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
A collection of 147 autograph letters and documents signed by the Generals of the American Revolution; see individual records in MA 558.1-147 for more information
Papers of William Moultrie by William Moultrie ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The journal of William Moultrie while a commissioner on the North and South Carolina boundary survey, 1772 by William Moultrie ( Book )
1 edition published in 1942 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
[Letter on the seizure of Oregon from the British] ( Book )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Hand-written letter discussing the idea that the United States can only take Oregon region from the British by force and the willingness of southern states to assist in such an undertaking. Circa 1818-1859, probably written between the treaty of 1818 which created the boundary dispute and the Oregon Treaty of 1846 which established the British-American boundary at the 49th parallel. Includes mention of James Gadsden, Francis Marion, William Moultrie, Thomas Pinckney, and Thomas Sumter
Correspondence Lord Charles Montague with Gen. William Moultrie, Charles-Town, 1781--"Where to hide myself from myself." by Charles Montague ( )
1 edition published in 1885 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
General orders of William Moultrie and Benjamin Lincoln by United States ( )
1 edition published in 1779 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Bound volume containing general orders (May 15-Sept. 27) given by Moultrie at Charleston, South Carolina, and orders (Nov. 6-Dec. 31) given by Gen. Benjamin Lincoln probably kept by Thomas Hall, captain in the 2nd South Carolina Regiment. Orders pertain to paroles, appointments, court martial records (with sentences including lashings and executions), officers, rations for women, and other matters
Boston, to William Moultrie by Massachusetts ( )
1 edition published in 1793 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Sending him "the Speech of the late Governor [John Hancock had died the day before], & the proceedings of the Legislature of this Commonwealth, upon a principle of National Government" [i.e. the question of whether states can be sued in the Supreme Court]; mentioning a suit brought against Massachusetts by William Vassall [Vassall v. Massachusetts]; noting that "the claim of a Judiciary Authority over a State possessed of Sovereignty, was of too much moment to be Submitted to, without the most serious deliberation" and that Hancock convened a special meeting of the Massachusetts legislature to debate the issue; writing that the legislature decided that allowing individuals to sue states is "unnecessary & inexpedient, & in its exercise dangerous to the peace, safety & independence of the Several States, & repugnant to the first principles of a Federal Government"; hoping that the governors of other states will encourage their legislatures to take up this question
Charleston, [S.C.], to Mr. Speaker and gentlemen of the House of Representatives by South Carolina ( )
1 edition published in 1786 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Feb. 9, 1786, message to the House of Representatives regarding the conflict between South Carolina legislation permitting white settlement northwest of the ancient boundary line between the Cherokee Nation and the state, and provisions of the treaty concluded at Hopewell, Nov. 28, 1785, between the United States and the Cherokee Indians
Stono [SC], to an unidentified recipient by William Moultrie ( )
1 edition published in 1779 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Acknowledging receipt of his letter which informed him of the order by the Governor and Council for "a draught of one third of the Militia. I hope they will have something to bind them to their duty, stronger than any we have had yet, at present I have no militia with me but about 25 of Col. Hammonds, all Goodwin's went off except the Major, 3 Lieu't & five privates which I discharged and sent the Officers home to collect more men;" asking for bags to "convey cornmeal...this is like to be our principal dependence this winter, as I am informed our wheat in the back country is totally lost;" reporting that he has just been informed "that the Enemy have landed at Beaufort and mean to maintain the island, they still talk of talking Post on the main this last I give but little credit to. A party of our Troops went on the island and brought off a young man prisoner who has given these accounts. I have sent him to Town. He says they have landed their sick & wounded & placed them in the Courthouse and Gaol which they have converted into Hospitals. This looks as if they intended staying there - is it not Scandalous to America that a handfull of men with two small men of War should ride triumphant and distress their Southern States when perhaps our Continental vessels are cruizing for the Emolument of their Commanders, should not this be represented to Congress?
 
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Languages
English (116)