WorldCat Identities

Capecchi, Mario R.

Overview
Works: 15 works in 27 publications in 1 language and 336 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings  History 
Roles: Editor, Author
Classifications: QH453, 591.87328
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Mario R Capecchi
Molecular genetics of early Drosophila and mouse development ( Book )
8 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 238 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
DNA ( Visual )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
With Dr. Jim Watson as guide, this program looks into the future of genetic manipulation, exploring some of the current and proposed ways scientists hope to improve humankind. Watson feels people should be able to enhance their own genes and those of their descendants. Also looks at the work of Dr. Mario Capecchi who manipulates mouse DNA for potential benefits to humans such as using genetics to enhance intelligence. Watson also addresses some of his critics, including a family with a son who has Down syndrome, and Dr. Kay Jamison, a world expert on manic depression and a manic depressive herself
DNA ( Visual )
3 editions published between 2003 and 2008 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Fifth in a five-part series. With Dr. Jim Watson as guide, looks into the future of genetic manipulation, exploring some of the current and proposed ways scientists hope to improve humankind. Watson feels people should be able to enhance their own genes and those of their descendants. Also looks at the work of Dr. Mario Capecchi who manipulates mouse DNA for potential benefits to humans such as using genetics to enhance intelligence. Watson also addresses some of his critics, including a family with a son who has Down syndrome, and Dr. Kay Jamison, a world expert on manic depression and a manic depressive herself
Pandora's box ( )
2 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
With Dr. Jim Watson as guide, this program looks into the future of genetic manipulation, exploring some of the current and proposed ways scientists hope to improve humankind. Watson feels people should be able to enhance their own genes and those of their descendants. Also looks at the work of Dr. Mario Capecchi who manipulates mouse DNA for potential benefits to humans such as using genetics to enhance intelligence. Watson also addresses some of his critics, including a family with a son who has Down syndrome, and Dr. Kay Jamison, a world expert on manic depression and a manic depressive herself
The Molecular genetic analysis of mouse development ( Book )
2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
UVSC summer university 2006 ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Since nearly all biological phenomena are mediated by genes, gene targeting is impacting the analysis of nearly all aspects of mammalian biology, including studies in cancer, development, immunology, neurobiology and human disease. This technology has many implications for clinical medicine. Scientists can simulate a human genetic disease in laboratory models, study its development, and test potential therapies against it
The Secret of life The future writ small ; A knockout for science ; Deadly patterns ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
pt.[1]. Secret of life - Fifty years ago, James Watson and Francis Crick announced to skeptical patrons in a Cambridge pub that they had just discovered the secret of life. Their discovery of the DNA double helix explained how cells divide and develop. Yet it was not enlightened guesswork alone that propelled Watson and Crick toward this fundamental revelation. In addition to building on the work other scientists, a fortuitous (and un-acknowledged at the time) collaboration with Rosalind Franklin, a British X-Ray crystallographer, was of crucial help in their great achievement. - pt.[2]. Future writ small - As laptops, mobile phones and other electronics continue to get smaller and smaller, scientists are looking at nanotechnology as the biggest tiny-frontier. Nanotechnology will allow us to build things atom by atom, from the bottom up. A new technology called nanolithography works fundamentally the same as the 4,000-year-old quill pen technology. When dipped in DNA 'molecular inks,' these nano-pens allow scientists to utilize the unique binding properties of DNA to build things at the molecular level. - pt.[3]. Knockout for science - What do you call something that's part man, part mouse? This isn't a bad joke - it's science reality. Once we find a gene responsible for human development or disease, the next step is often to invent a new mouse - sometimes with a human gene inside. We will meet Mario Capecchi, the man who created these living tools for studying humans. His own story is almost as unusual as the mice he engineers. - pt.[4]. Deadly patterns - The process of identifying toxins and carcinogens is quite laborious. It can take years and the costs can swell into the millions of dollars. Ken Olden of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences is leading the way in a new field of science called toxicogenomics. Utilizing the information from The Human Genome Project, Olden and his colleagues are studying genetic responses to certain chemicals thought to be dangerous. Their goal is to create a database of how organisms respond to harmful chemicals, which could in turn help researchers and drug developers save considerable amounts of time and money
Gene targeting: an historical perspective by Mario R Capecchi( )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Creating mice with targeted disruptions in proto-oncogenes and homeobox genes ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The top portion of the poster consists of a gray square with a model representing a cell or genome. There is a turquoise ring, and an inner dark blue circle with orange circles with dark blue dots in the center. Fluorescent green dots are being added to the dark blue inner circle, coming from a thick brown strip. The bottom portion of the poster lists Mario Capecchi's affiliation as an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Utah Medical Center. It also gives the date, time, and location of the lecture
Creating mice with targeted disruptions in proto-oncogenes and homeobox genes by Mario R Capecchi( Recording )
1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Of mice and a man Getting under your skin ; Mapping the mutts ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Pt.[1]. Of mice and a man - What do you call something that's part man, part mouse? This isn't a bad joke or a science fiction movie ... it's science reality. Once researchers find a gene responsible for human development or disease, their next step can be inventing a mouse sometimes with a human gene inside. We will meet a man who creates these living tools for studying humans, Mario Capecchi. His own story is almost as unusual as the mice he engineers. - pt.[2]. Getting under your skin - Seeing is believing. As genomic science has pushed the understanding of how cells function, it has become necessary to find better ways of seeing those cells at work. New microscopy techniques combining fluorescent probes, laser-scanning technology, supercomputing power, and digital photography have given us a new look at cell processes. The Joint Center for Bio-Imaging is developing new technology designed to peer inside living cells in whole organisms. This "optical biopsy" gives doctors a powerful new tool, which will speed diagnosis of many diseases. - pt.[3]. Mapping the mutts - Man's best friend is in trouble and we are partly to blame. As we breed dogs with award winning traits, we are also inadvertently breeding dogs that have hip dysplasia, blood disorders, and cancers. With the advent of genetic mapping breeders have a new tool to aid in breeding excellence in and diseases out of dog family lines. The dog genome has already begun to help the dog and it just might help uncover human disease mysteries as well
Mouse models of human disease from cancer to neuropsychiatric disorders by Mario R Capecchi( Visual )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
(CIT): Dr. Capecchi began his research at the University of Utah in 1973. Thirty-four years later, on December 10, 2007, Dr. Capecchi received the highest honor in his field, the Nobel Prize, for his work in molecular biology. His pioneering work in gene targeting of mouse embryo-derived stem cells has set a new standard for research worldwide
 
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Audience level: 0.72 (from 0.00 for Gene targe ... to 1.00 for Creating m ...)
Languages
English (27)