WorldCat Identities

Citizens for Kennedy (Organization)

Overview
Works: 39 works in 54 publications in 1 language and 55 library holdings
Genres: Political platforms 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Citizens for Kennedy (Organization)
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy asks the support of Minnesota viewers in the November election]( Visual )

8 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The current Administration's policies have "sapped Arkansas' economic chances." To build a stronger country we must build our states. Whereas the Republican Administration has failed in the areas of farming, interest rates, and the development of natural resources, a Kennedy Administration would implement programs to protect agriculture and small business, develop full employment, and strengthen the country and the economy
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Civil rights]( Visual )

4 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In response to a question from the audience, John F. Kennedy points to ways the president could immediately address civil rights issues without legislation. He could sign an executive order ending discrimination in housing, and could compel all government contractors to invoke non-discriminatory hiring practices. The current Administration exacerbates the problem by failing to indicate endorsement of the Supreme Court decision
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Agricultural policy]( Visual )

3 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The decline of agricultural income is the number one economic domestic issue and must be stopped; the Democratic Party and its standardbearer, John F. Kennedy, are determined that agricultural income will go up. The country's food abundance is a blessing, not a problem. It should be put to work, at home and abroad, to help humanity. The Party believes in the family farm as the best system of agriculture, and that an economic program for agriculture that will protect it must be sought. Humphrey believes that if American farms can be profitable, then America's cities will have full employment
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Kennedy-Nixon debate--excerpts. New American leadership]( Visual )

2 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Excerpts from a Kennedy-Nixon debate present Kennedy's belief that America "can do better." Kennedy believes the U.S. is a great and powerful country, but that it could be greater and more powerful. He is not satisfied with current steel production, the low economic growth rate, or the fact that the U.S. has over 9 billion dollars of food, some of it rotting, even though there is a hungry world and every month four million Americans wait for a government food package that averages five cents a day per individual. He is not satisfied when the Soviet Union turns out twice as many scientists and engineers as the U.S., when many teachers are underpaid, when children go to school in part-time shifts. He is not satisfied until every American enjoys his full constitutional rights. He compares a Negro baby's chances for future success with those of a white baby. Contrary to what some say, Kennedy does not want to turn everything over to the government; he wants the individuals to meet their responsibilities, and the states to meet theirs, but there is also a national responsibility. Those who feel the status quo is satisfactory should vote for Nixon. "The question before us all ... is can freedom, in the next generation, conquer, or are the communists going to be successful? ... If we meet our responsibilities, I think freedom will conquer ... If we fail to move ahead ... to develop sufficient military and economic and social
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy speaks to Massachusetts viewers]( Visual )

2 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Under current law, the elderly must sign a pauper's oath in order to receive federal financial assistance for medical care. Kennedy favors a plan wherein financial assistance would be provided through the Social Security system
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy visits with a retired couple, the MacNamaras, to discuss the high cost of their medical care, Newport, Kentucky]( Visual )

2 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mr. MacNamara explains his injury and the resultant medical bills which caused him to go into debt. Kennedy points out that no legislation on the books addresses this problem, and states that he favors a plan under which senior citizens could receive assistance with their medical bills from the Social Security fund, thus preventing the situation described here
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Natural resources]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The current Administration has a policy in the West of no new starts on river development, of holding back on conservation and irrigation, of wasting forest resources, of letting mineral resources go to waste, and of carrying on limited research on desalinization. If elected, Kennedy will build and expand forest programs, cleanse rivers of pollution, carry out reclamation and conservation programs on the land, and try to move ahead in those areas that have been cut back
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Harry Belafonte speaks to John F. Kennedy about equality of opportunity]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In the context of equal opportunity, Kennedy states his support of a higher minimum wage, civil rights, and better housing, working conditions, and jobs
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Adlai Stevenson speaks to viewers in support of John F. Kennedy]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Adlai Stevenson asserts that the 1960 election is more than a testing of two parties and two men; it is a test of whether both at home and abroad the U.S. will live up to its image of honor, liberty, and dignity for all people or if it will become soft, complacent, and apathetic. Kennedy has led the fight for a better minimum wage, for Social Security-funded medical care for the aged, and for federal aid to education. Under his leadership, the United States will win the fight for human rights
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Adlai Stevenson speaks to viewers about peace policies]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Adlai Stevenson asserts that two policies for peace are being offered the United States. Rather than follow the current policy of backtalk, bickering, and obsession with Khrushchev's activities, the United States should reassert its own position. The majority of the world's nations wait for the United States to assume leadership for liberty and peace
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Federal aid to education]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In response to a question from the audience, John F. Kennedy points to barriers which have prevented passage of an effective federal aid to education bill, in particular, the Administration's threat of veto
John F. Kennedy speaks on the Middle East( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A review of the Democratic and Republican party platforms on the Middle East and an examination of the records of, and positions taken on Israel by, the presidential and vice-presidential candidates of both parties. Includes excerpts from Kennedy's speech before the Zionist Organization of America, New York, N.Y., August 26, 1960
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. You will choose one of two men--should John F. Kennedy be your choice?]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In 1932, Kennedy says, the United States made a decision which preserved its freedom. The great issue in 1960 is for the people to make the kind of decision which will preserve freedom around the world. In the Revolution of 1776, Thomas Paine said that the cause of America is the cause of all mankind. Kennedy believes that in 1960, the cause of all mankind is the cause of America. "If we fail ... the cause of freedom fails ... If we succeed, if we meet our responsibilities, if we bear our burdens, then I think freedom succeeds here and also it succeeds around the world."
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy visits with three women who have lost their sons to war, Newport, Kentucky--unedited footage and two copies of the spot itself]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In Newport, Kentucky, Kennedy sits at a dining table with Mrs. Stiles, Mrs. Shay, and Mrs. Wagner, each of whom lost a son to war. The crew sets up, Kennedy confirms the women's names and hometowns, and asks the director how they should start. To begin the political spot itself, Kennedy introduces himself, then the three women, explaining that each lost a son to war. Each woman speaks briefly about her son's military service and death. Kennedy states his own brother died in service, and that peace is a central concern of the 1960s. Khrushchev is unstable and the Chinese Communists have dedicated themselves to destruction of the U.S., believing that war is the way to communize the world. The best way to maintain peace is to be strong and to make sure that lines of commitment are clearly drawn and known. He cites examples of Hitler and North Korea. He looks with some optimism at the chances of maintaining peace in the sixties. If elected, he will devote all his energies to that. "We've had enough war." The women concur; Mrs. Stiles says she has three grown grandsons and wouldn't want anything to happen to them. Kennedy is hopeful that if the U.S. can keep its strength and nerves and persevere, the country can remain at peace. "Senator John Kennedy with words to remember on election day. A man who knows the suffering of war but is dedicated to peace ... For new American leadership in the sixties, vote for John F. Kennedy for president"--Voice over
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. To see things as they are is the test of a man; to see what must be done and do it is the test of a democracy]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

John F. Kennedy speaks on domestic issues. The Republican Party has said no to progress, has vetoed progress; the country has been standing still. Kennedy will send to the Congress specific programs designed to carry out the following objectives: develop the country's resources (clean rivers, build roads, and put people to work in companies and businesses which have the resources to use the great wealth the Lord gave us); stimulate private investment by eliminating the artificial restrictions which the current Administration's high interest rate-tight money policy has placed on the economy's growth; and provide more federal aid to education
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy visits with three women who have lost their sons to war, Newport, Kentucky]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In Newport, Kentucky, Kennedy sits at a dining table with Mrs. Stiles, Mrs. Shay, and Mrs. Wagner, each of whom lost a son to war. Kennedy introduces himself, then the three women, explaining that each lost a son to war. Each woman speaks briefly about her son's military service and death. Kennedy states his own brother died in service, and that peace is a central concern of the 1960s. Khrushchev is unstable and the Chinese Communists have dedicated themselves to destruction of the U.S., believing that war is the way to communize the world. The best way to maintain peace is to be strong and to make sure that lines of commitment are clearly drawn and known. He cites examples of Hitler and North Korea. He looks with some optimism at the chances of maintaining peace in the sixties. If elected, he will devote all his energies to that. "We've had enough war." The women concur; Mrs. Stiles says she has three grown grandsons and wouldn't want anything to happen to them. Kennedy is hopeful that if the U.S. can keep its strength and nerves and persevere, the country can remain at peace. "John Kennedy, a man who knows the suffering of war but who is dedicated to the pursuit of peace ... This country needs new American leadership; the world needs it. John Kennedy for president"--Voice over
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Interrelatedness of domestic and foreign policies]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Excerpts from various Kennedy speeches and the presidential debate present his "message of leadership for the sixties." Kennedy believes there is a vital interrelationship between domestic and foreign policy and cites Wilson's and Roosevelt's policies as examples (Salt Lake City, Sept. 23, 1960). Domestic policy affects the security of the U.S. around the world. "If countries in Africa and Latin America and Asia see us standing still, and the Soviet Union and the Chinese Communists moving ahead, then they decide that the future belongs to them and not to us. I think the future belongs to us" (Redding, Calif., Sept. 8, 1960). In March, 1946, Winston Churchill announced that an Iron Curtain had descended across the European continent, warning that time was short and that the world cannot "take the course of allowing events to drift along until it is too late." Kennedy states that "these prophetic words of 1946 are true in 1960. If we are to protect our heritage of freedom, if we are to maintain it around the world, we must be strong, militarily, educationally, scientifically, and morally strong, and that is why I am dedicating this campaign to the goal of a stronger America" (Saint Louis, Mo., October 2, 1960). He expresses similar sentiments in excerpts from the presidential debate in Chicago and his speech in Buffalo, N.Y., September 28, 1960. "Senator John F. Kennedy, the man who will bring us new American leadership for the sixties, leadership that faces up squarely to America's challenges, leadership that will again move democracy ahead. John F. Kennedy for president"--Voice over
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy asks New York viewers to register to vote, then asks their support]( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A message from Adlai Stevenson( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

According to Stevenson, the United States can and must win the great struggle between its system and that of the communists, and it must win it without nuclear war. The years 1952 through 1960 have been years of declining power and influence for the country. Senator Kennedy offers the vigorous and principled leadership which will answer Khrushchev's bluster not with words, and not with bombs, but by summoning forth the strength of the world's people for peace. Stevenson's points are illustrated by excerpts from Kennedy's presidential nomination acceptance speech at the Los Angeles Coliseum
 
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English (39)