WorldCat Identities

Crane, Conrad C.

Overview
Works: 48 works in 104 publications in 1 language and 3,149 library holdings
Genres: History  Conference papers and proceedings  Periodicals 
Roles: Author
Classifications: D790, 940.544973
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Conrad C Crane
Bombs, cities, and civilians : American airpower strategy in World War II by Conrad C Crane( Book )

5 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 492 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

En skildring af den amerikanske bombeoffensiv under 2. verdenskrig, herunder virkningen på flybestningerne og betydningen af denne offensiv på udfaldet af krigen
American airpower strategy in Korea, 1950-1953 by Conrad C Crane( Book )

5 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 357 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Beskriver USA's luftoperationer i Koreakrigen, herunder strategien og resultaterne
Landpower and crises : army roles and missions in smaller-scale contingencies during the 1990s by Conrad C Crane( Book )

4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 211 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The author analyzes the role of landpower in the 170 smaller-scale contingencies conducted by the United States during the last decade. He divides such contingencies into engagement, enhanced deterrence, hostility, and stabilization phases, and discusses the military's role in each one. The author especially emphasizes the recurring problems in the planning, execution, and force structure for stabilization tasks, including nation-building. He concludes that, despite the desire of American leaders to limit military involvement in such missions, it is unavoidable because of the capability mismatch between military and civilian organizations, combined with the requirements of peace operations and the character of American soldiers. Recommendations include acceptance of some degree of nation-building as the Army's mission and adapting its force structure, training, and planning accordingly
Alternative national military strategies for the United States by Conrad C Crane( Book )

7 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 178 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Summarizes presentations given at a conference convened by the U.S. Army War College and the Georgetown University Center for Peace and Security Studies
Reconstructing Iraq : insights, challenges, and missions for military forces in a post-conflict scenario by Conrad C Crane( Book )

16 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In October 2002, the U.S. Army War College[alpha]s Strategic Studies Institute, in coordination with the Office of the Army Deputy Chief of Staff/G-3, initiated a study to analyze how American and coalition forces can best address the requirements that will necessarily follow operational victory in a war with Iraq. The objectives of the project were to determine and analyze probable missions for military forces in a post-Saddam Iraq; examine associated challenges; and formulate strategic recommendations for transferring responsibilities to coalition partners or civilian organizations, mitigating local animosity, and facilitating overall mission accomplishment in the war against terrorism. The study has much to offer planners and executors of operations to occupy and reconstruct Iraq, but also has many insights that will apply to achieving strategic objectives in any conflict after hostilities are concluded. The current war against terrorism has highlighted the danger posed by failed and struggling states. If this nation and its coalition partners decide to undertake the mission to remove Saddam Hussein, they will also have to be prepared to dedicate considerable time, manpower, and money to the effort to reconstruct Iraq after the fighting is over. Otherwise, the success of military operations will be ephemeral, and the problems they were designed to eliminate could return or be replaced by new and more virulent difficulties
Transforming defense by U.S. Army War College Conference on Strategy( Book )

8 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 81 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The ideas and issues presented in this collection of papers from the Twelfth Annual Strategy Conference conducted by the U.S. Army War College in April 2001 will educate and inform anyone interested in the past and future course of American defense reform. Though conference attendees had many differing opinions about the barriers to defense transformation and how to overcome them, a broad consensus formed that some change is essential to meet future security requirements. They observed at the time that it is ironic that the peace which creates the prosperity and wealth to fund transformation and permits a window of time to achieve it, also decreases public interest and urgency to accomplish it. The terrible events of September 11, 2001, appear to have dispelled public disinterest in the nation s military capabilities, and may provide increased impetus for the drive for defense reform. If the opportunity is squandered, or the wrong choices are made, the costs to the nation someday could be catastrophic
Facing the hydra : maintaining strategic balance while pursuing a global war against terrorism by Conrad C Crane( Book )

5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Dr. Conrad Crane analyzes the impact of the war on terrorism and the requirements of the 2001 Quadrennial Defense Review on the many essential missions conducted by the U.S. Armed Forces. Focusing primarily on the Army, he highlights the requirements associated with combat operations against terrorists, accelerating transformation and the new emphasis on homeland security and force protection. At the same time, he points out that the Army and the other Services must remain involved worldwide in day-to-day assurance, dissuasion, and deterrence activities; execution of peace operations and other smaller-scale contingencies; and remaining ready for other major combat operations. Dr. Crane asserts that these obligations require the Army to reshape and expand its force structure. Failure to do so places critical missions at risk around the world could lead to replacement of operational "victory" in the war on terrorism with strategic failure, as regional instability increases around the world."--SSI
USAWC key strategic issues list by Conrad C Crane( Book )

3 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 67 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Precedents, variables, and options in planning a U.S. military disengagement strategy from Iraq by W. Andrew Terrill( Book )

4 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The questions of how to empower the Iraqis most effectively and then progressively withdraw non-Iraqi forces from that country is one of the most important policy problems currently facing the United States. The authors seek to present the U.S. situation in Iraq in all of its complexity and ambiguity, with policy recommendations for how that withdrawal strategy might be most effectively implemented
Avoiding Vietnam : the U.S. Army's response to defeat in Southeast Asia by Conrad C Crane( Book )

4 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As American operations against terrorism spread around the globe to places like Afghanistan and the Philippines, an increasing tendency has been for commentators to draw parallels with past experience in Vietnam. Even soldiers on the ground have begun to speak in such terms. The author analyzes the Army's response to that defeat in Southeast Asia and its long-term impact. Contrary to the accepted wisdom that nations which lose wars tend to learn best how to correct their mistakes, he argues that Americans tried to forget the unhappy experience with counterinsurgency by refocusing on conventional wars. While that process eventually produced the powerful force that won the Persian Gulf War, it left an Army with force structure, doctrine, and attitudes that are much less applicable to the peace operations and counterterrorism campaign it now faces. The author asserts that the Army must change in order to operate effectively in the full spectrum of future requirements, and it is time to reexamine the war in Vietnam. He also draws attention to the service's "Lessons Learned" process, and provides insights as to how the experience gained in Operation ENDURING FREEDOM should be analyzed and applied
Civil, military, and political cooperation in conflict resolution and post-conflict rebuilding by Conrad C Crane( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Korean War : lessons for the next fifty years by Conrad C Crane( Book )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. Army's initial impressions of Operations Enduring Freedom and Noble Eagle by Eugene L Thompson( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The grenade( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A weekly newsletter describing the progress of the various Cadet companies through the six-week summer field training held at Camp Buckner, U.S. Military Academy
Roland lectures Law cannot prohibit what physics makes possible( Visual )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Beware of Boldness( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At a counterterrorism conference in September 2004, then-Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Richard B. Myers stated that the key question senior officials needed to ask about their conduct of the Global War on Terrorism was, "Are we being as bold and innovative as we need to be?"1 Army Field Manual 7.0, Training the Force, states that the goals of operational deployments and major training opportunities are to enhance unit readiness and "produce bold, innovative leaders."2 These adjectives have now become accepted as key components of the lexicon of defense transformation. But before the words become etched in stone, the Army and the other services should seriously think about what these terms mean for leaders, and their historical role in the American military experience. The colloquial caution, "Be careful what you ask for, because you just might get it," is worth pondering
Maintaining strategic balance while fighting terrorism by Conrad C Crane( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Facing the Hydra: Maintaining Strategic Balance While Pursuing A Global War Against Terrorism( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Arguments to maintain strategic balance while fighting the global war on terrorism usually fall on receptive ears in the Pentagon. Although some are ready to disengage internationally to focus on fighting terrorists, most clearly see the value of continuing activities that deter crises and assist tremendously in the resolution of conflict when deterrence fails. Fewer seem to realize that maintaining strategic balance will require more than just better guidance, planning, and training. Increased force structure accompanied by revisions in the makeup of that structure and by reallocation between the Active and Reserve Components will be required to enable the Services to win both operational and strategic victory in the war on terrorism, while also keeping the peace in other parts of the world
Precedents, variables, and options in planning a U.S. military disengagement strategy from Iraq by W. Andrew Terrill( )

3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Having invaded Iraq and deposed a tyrannical dictator in early 2003, the United States assumed some important commitments to the Iraqi population, who were left without a government or viable security forces following the destruction of Saddam Hussein's regime. The U.S. administration has defined a central part of its approach to the situation as "leaving Iraq better than we found it." In its maximalist form, this statement calls for empowering a decent and accountable government and providing strong indigenous security forces to defend the country and maintain internal security. At a minimum, leaving Iraq better than we found it requires a stable government and the continued national unity of Iraq (rather than its separation into smaller warring territories), as well as the avoidance of civil war
The Air Campaign Over Korea: Pressuring the Enemy( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The staff of Far East Air Forces (FFAF) conducted the first systematic study of measures to produce a negotiated settlement in a limited war through airpower some fifty years ago. As both the conflict and truce talks continued stalemate on the ground and ineffective interdiction inspired Brigadier General Jacob Smart FFAF deputy commander for operations to look for a better way to utilize resources. He directed Colonel R.L. Randolph and Lieutenant Colonel B.I. Mayo to find a means of unhinging the communist forces in North Korea. The result prompted a new vision for employing airpower--pressuring enemy leaders to abandon the fight
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.45 (from 0.05 for Roland lec ... to 1.00 for The Air Ca ...)

Bombs, cities, and civilians : American airpower strategy in World War II
Alternative Names
Conrad Crane US-amerikanischer Militrstratege

Languages
English (75)

Covers
American airpower strategy in Korea, 1950-1953Reconstructing Iraq : insights, challenges, and missions for military forces in a post-conflict scenario