WorldCat Identities

Glaser, D. A.

Overview
Works: 10 works in 16 publications in 1 language and 137 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: QP356, 612.82
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about D. A Glaser
 
Most widely held works by D. A Glaser
Exploring brain functions : models in neuroscience : report of the Dahlem Workshop on Exploring Brain Functions: Models in Neuroscience, Berlin, 1991 September 29-October 4 by Dahlem Workshop on Exploring Brain Functions: Models in Neuroscience( Book )
7 editions published between 1991 and 1993 in English and held by 127 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Methods of particle detection for high-energy physics experiments by Hugh Bradner( Book )
1 edition published in 1958 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Particle detection instruments may be divided into two classes; devices which see the actual path of the particle, and counting devices which indicate the passage of a particle. Examples of each class are given, the characteristics of each example are tabulated, and the uses for each device are discussed. (D.E.B.)
What can we see, how do we see it, and why do we see things that aren't there? by D. A Glaser( Visual )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Prof. Donald Glaser talks about the human visual system which contains 10 ̂11 neurons, of which one third are devoted to vision alone. We know the wiring diagram and the psychophysics of the system quite well, but we don't understand the meaning of the inter-neuronal signals. Since each neuron receives trains of random voltage spikes from about 10 ̂4 other neurons, the traffic is noisy and intense and yet we see the world as stable, clear, and gapless. He summarizes the wiring diagram (anatomy), the conventional bag of tricks theory of how the system works (which he things is wrong), and outlines the alternative model, the Excitable Nueronal Array, which is a simple neural network characterized by a small number of parameters. The dynamic properties of the ENA can account for perception of motion, depth, and perhaps other visual abilities. Finally, he shows some static pictures in which illusory motion is seen. The model accounts for these illusions as a consequence of statistical voltage fluctuations, analogous to stochastic resonance in a noisy brain, in which noise is otherwise nearly always suppressed
The momentum distribution of charged cosmic ray particles near sea level by D. A Glaser( Book )
1 edition published in 1950 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Comparison of human performance with algorithms for estimating fractal dimension of fractional brownian statistics by T Kumar( Book )
1 edition published in 1993 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Exploring brain functions : models in neuroscience : proceedings... ( Book )
1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Exploring brain functions : models in neuroscience : Dahlem workshop : Papers and reports ( )
1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The momentum distribution of charged cosmic ray particles near sea level by D. A Glaser( )
1 edition published in 1950 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
NOTE: Text or symbols not renderable in plain ASCII are indicated by [...]. Abstract is included in .pdf document. A new measurement of the momentum distribution of high energy charged cosmic ray particles at sea level has been made by means of a technique involving the use of two cloud chambers and a large electromagnet. With about twice the precision of previous determinations, the spectrum is extended to a momentum of pe = 80 Bev. For the 1547 measureable sets of tracks recorded, the positive-negative ratio is 1.26 [plus or minus] 0.06, Up to the highest momenta measured the differential spectrum falls off as 1/p[superscript s] with s = 2 very nearly. The positive excess and positive-negative ratio appear to be functions of momentum with the positives predominating at about 1.3 Bev. In other respects the positive and negative spectra are very similar. Although the effect is barely outside statistical uncertainty, there seems to be an anomolous dip in the momentum distribution at about 3 Bev. In addition to this there seems to have been a small diurnal variation in the spectrum during the time the experiments were performed, 1 Bev and 4 Bev particles being slightly favored during the day and 3 Bev and 7 Bev particles being favored at night. These effects are discussed and the present results are compared with data of other experimenters
 
Audience Level
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Audience Level
1
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Audience level: 0.84 (from 0.00 for Oral histo ... to 1.00 for The bubble ...)
Alternative Names
Glaser, Donald Arthur
Languages
English (14)
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