WorldCat Identities

Lynch, Michael E.

Overview
Works: 42 works in 47 publications in 1 language and 60 library holdings
Genres: Tours  Guidebooks  History  Biography  Military history  Personal narratives  Personal narratives‡vAmerican  Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, Thesis advisor
Classifications: F234.L9, 917.5567
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Michael E Lynch
 
Most widely held works by Michael E Lynch
Confederate war industry : the Niter and Mining Bureau by Michael E Lynch( )

3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tour Lynchburg : a personal tour guide to Lynchburg, Virginia by Michael E Lynch( Book )

2 editions published between 1985 and 1994 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

American political participation : a computer-assisted learning package in social policy analysis by Michael E Lynch( Book )

1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Quarterhorse in Bosnia 1996 a case study of American stability operations in the post-Cold War era by Mark A Viney( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Commencing in December 1995, Operation Joint Endeavor sought to implement a peace agreement concluding a bloody, ethnically motivated civil war in Bosnia. Over 57,000 NATO Soldiers participated in the year-long operation, which was the first-ever ground operation conducted by NATO and the largest military operation in Europe since World War Two. The 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry (Quarterhorse) was one of the first combat units of NATO's Implementation Force (IFOR) to enter Bosnia, where it played a pivotal role in the international effort to mend that nation still smoldering from three and a half years of brutal civil war. Despite the mountainous terrain, bad weather, tens of thousands of land mines, the periodic threat of terrorist attack, and the political imperative to minimize American casualties, Quarterhorse upheld the peace in one of the most challenging parts of the American sector. A useful case study of stability operations during the Age of Interventions (1989-2001), the American experience in Bosnia contributed to the development of military leaders who would go on to lead combat and stability operations in Iraq and Afghanistan
The G.I. experience in the Korean War a precursor to Vietnam? by Peter S Kindsvatter( Visual )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Kindsvatter examines the Korean War soldier's experiences to show how something akin to "mass disaffection" did indeed take hold during the Korean War, a pattern repeated over the course of the Vietnam War. He addresses the soldier's faltering belief in the cause, the perceived lack of home front awareness or concern, the G. I.'s lack of faith in their South Korean allies, and the increasing challenges for junior leaders tasked to prosecute a war that their soldiers increasingly believed, as one put it, "was being fought for nothing."
Publishing your family history on the World Wide Web : a genealogist's guide to hypermedia by Michael E Lynch( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

World War II in Europe a view from a foxhole by Mitchell Kaidy( Visual )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The 87th Infantry Division fought in General George S. Patton's Third U.S. Army during World War II. After months of training, first at Camp McCain, Mississippi, then at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, the division shipped overseas. They first entered combat in France's Alsace-Lorraine, and after extremely bloody fighting, crossed the German border in the Saar, capturing the towns of Walsheim and Medelsheim. Caught up in the Third Army's historic counterattack in the Battle of the Bulge, the 87th Division raced off into Belgium, attacking the German Panzer Lehr Division near Bastogne at the towns of Pironpre, Moircy, Bonnerue, and Tillet. Soon after breaching the Siegfried Line in the Eifel Mountains, the division crossed the Moselle River and captured Koblenz. Then the Rhine River crossing near Boppard and the dash across Germany which took them to Plauen, near the Czech border
Preparing for victory Thomas Holcomb and the making of the modern Marine Corps, 1936-1943 by David J Ulbrich( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Before the attack on Pearl Harbor, numerous challenges confronted the U.S. Marine Corps, including fiscal restraints, manpower shortages, promotion bottlenecks, and isolationist sentiments. An entirely different set of difficulties emerged after Pearl Harbor. Despite these obstacles, Commandant Thomas Holcomb supervised the Marine Corps' mobilization in the Second World War's initial twenty-four months. During his entire commandancy, the Corps grew from 18,000 men in 1936 to 385,000 in 1943. Not only did Holcomb leave the Corps much larger, but he also guided its transition into an armed service capable of making amphibious assaults thousands of miles across the Pacific. Although a visionary leader, shrewd publicist, meticulous planner, and progressive manager, he has been ignored or given short shrift in most histories of the Corps. This presentation will write Holcomb back in the history of the Second World War. It will evaluate him as a manager using such case studies as the development of amphibious warfare, the reorganization of Headquarters Marine Corps, and the introduction of women and African Americans into the Corps. Ultimately, Commandant Holcomb did more than any other leatherneck to transform the Marine Corps into the modern force-in-readiness that would help win the Pacific War and see action during the Cold War and more recent conflicts
How we fight crusades, quagmires, and the American way of war by Dominic Tierney( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Americans love war. We've never run from a fight. Our triumphs from the American Revolution to World War II define who we are as a nation and a people. Americans hate war. Our leaders rush us into conflicts without knowing the facts or understanding the consequences. Korea, Vietnam, and now Iraq and Afghanistan define who we are as a nation and a people. Why are we so often at war? Do we fight conflicts in a uniquely American way? Why do we win and lose? These issues and questions are discussed in this presentation
We are soldiers still a journey back to the battlefields of Vietnam by Joseph L Galloway( Visual )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Traveling back to the red-dirt battlefields, commanders and veterans from both sides make the long and difficult journey from old enemies to new friends. After a trip in a Russian-made helicopter to the Ia Drang Valley in the Central Highlands, with the Vietnamese pilots using vintage U.S. Army maps and Galloway's Boy Scout compass to guide them, they reach the hallowed ground where so many died. All the men are astonished at how nature has reclaimed the land once scarred by bullets, napalm, and blood. As darkness falls, the unthinkable happens: the authors and many of their old comrades are stranded overnight, alone, left to confront the ghosts of the departed among the termite hills and creek bed
Morality In Action Risking Death And Caring For Life In American Food Allergy Worlds by Danya Alexandria Glabau( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This dissertation investigates the social effects of the food allergy "epidemic" in the contemporary United States, a state of affairs which activists publicize in highly moral terms, based on multi-sited ethnographic research conducted from 2013 to 2016. I argue that the moral framing of this apparent threat to health by mothers, sufferers, and activists is strategic, leveraging gendered obligations to provide care for the young, sick, and disabled, pharmaceutical and food industry approaches to marketing that make moral appeals to customers, and American political sensibilities about who is deserving of accommodations and concern to gain public recognition for food allergy as a life-threatening disease. Situated at the interface of science and technology studies (STS) and medical anthropology, this dissertation brings together risk theory, the anthropology of ethics and morality, STS and anthropological understandings of medical technologies, disability studies, and feminist theory and research on gender and caretaking. This text brings to light how patients and caretakers balance the risk of harm and death posed by a highly allergic body with the desire to live a "normal" social life, how the pursuit of the "hygienic sublime" to minimize risk intensifies the moral stakes of caretaking and self care work, and what is at stake socially, morally, and financially in positioning food allergy as an easily manageable condition versus a serious disability. Shared experiences, including the use of elaborate hygienic techniques to ensure the safety of foods and environments and reliance on biomedical tools like epinephrine auto-injectors, and a shared fear of death unite adult sufferers and caretakers of allergic children with other stakeholders to engage in legislative advocacy and public awareness campaigns to ensure the safety of people with food allergies. The resulting food allergy advocacy community is emblematic of the role played by patient advocacy in healthcare today: through complicated alliances with physician-researchers, the highly professionalized patient advocacy industry, and deep-pocketed pharmaceutical companies, food allergy activists seek to make the formerly private and shameful problem of food allergy a matter of shared, public responsibility
Why the French & Indian War is worth remembering the ironies of a decisive victory by Fred Anderson( Visual )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Histories of the American Revolution tend to start in 1763, the end of the Seven Years' War, a worldwide struggle for empire that pitted France against England in North America, Europe, and Asia. Among its surprising results was the disruption of the British empire as a political system; indeed, within a dozen years that empire fell into the civil war that produced in the American Revolution. Fred Anderson, Professor of History at the University of Colorado at Boulder, will seek to explain the significance of the American phase of the Seven Years' War-- commonly called the French and Indian War-- in American history, affirming that the best way to understand the Revolution is as part of a 40-year-long attempt to assert imperial control over the Forks of the Ohio, where Pittsburgh now stands. He will argue in favor of the perhaps surprising proposition that winning an imperial war in a decisive way may ultimately carry consequences more harmful to the victor than the vanquished
Warlord a life of Winston Churchill at war, 1874-1945 by Carlo D'Este( Visual )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Before he became a politician Winston Churchill was first a soldier who had a lifelong obsession with all things military that not only shaped the man and war leader he later became but played a major role in the Allied victory in World War II. From Cuba to the Northwest Frontier, the Sudan, South Africa and World War I, Churchill's extraordinary military experiences were the training ground for the great role he was destined to play as Britain's war leader during the Second World War. Carlo D'Este examines Winston Churchill through the prism of his military service as both a soldier and a warlord: a descendant of Marlborough who, despite never having risen above the rank of lieutenant colonel, came eventually at age sixty-five to direct Britain's military campaigns as prime minister and defeated Hitler, Mussolini, and Hirohito for the democracies. Warlord is the definitive chronicle of Churchill's crucial role as one of the world's most renowned military leaders, from his early adventures on the North-West Frontier of colonial India and the Boer War through his extraordinary service in both World Wars. D'Este paints a masterful, unsparing portrait of one of history's most fascinating and influential leaders during what was arguably the most crucial event in human history
Combat ready? : the Eighth U.S. Army on the eve of the Korean War by Thomas E Hanson( Visual )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In the decades since the "forgotten war" in Korea, conventional wisdom has held that the Eighth Army consisted largely of poorly trained, undisciplined troops who fled in terror from the onslaught of the Communist forces. The generalizations historians and fellow soldiers have used regarding these troops do little justice to the tens of thousands of soldiers who worked to make themselves and their army ready for war. This careful study of combat preparedness in the Eighth Army from 1949 to the outbreak of hostilities in 1950 shows that the U.S. soldiers sent to Korea suffered gaps in their professional preparation, from missing and broken equipment to unevenly trained leaders at every level of command. But after a year of progressive, focused, and developmental collective training -- based largely on the lessons of combat in World War II -- these soldiers expected to defeat the Communist enemy. By recognizing the constraints under which the Eighth Army operated, Hanson asserts that scholars and soldiers will be able to discard what Douglas Macarthur called the "pernicious myth" of the Eighth Army's professional, physical, and moral ineffectiveness
Institutional change in the Army since 9/11 by Michael E Lynch( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Video from the United States Army War College's Landpower Conference, held 2-4 December, 2015. Features three speeches: "This we'll defend : why America needs the Army to protect its national interests in a complex world", by Michael Johnson, "Building strategic landpower : an innovation after action review : 1999 to 2009", by David Fastabend, and "Institutional strategic planning : why it matters", by Lee Pearce, followed by a question and answer session moderated by Michael Lynch
"Sic 'em Ned" : Edward M. Almond and his Army, 1916-1953 by Michael E Lynch( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Edward Mallory "Ned" Almond belonged to the generation of US Army officers who came of age during World War I and went on to hold important command positions in World War II and the Korean War. His contemporaries included some of America's greatest captains such as Omar N. Bradley. While Almond is no longer a household name, he played a key role in Army history. Almond was ambitious and gave his all to everything he did. He was a careful student of his profession, a successful commander at battalion and corps level, a dedicated staff officer, something of a scholar, a paternalistic commander turned vehement racist, and a right-wing zealot. He earned his greatest accolades commanding the American troops who landed at Inchon, South Korea, on September 15, 1950, an amphibious flanking movement that temporarily transformed the nature of the Korean War. A solider of such accomplishments and contradictions has gone too long without a scholarly biography; this dissertation will fill that void. This biography of Lt. Gen. Edward M. Almond makes a significant and original contribution to the existing historiography by examining his life in the context of the times in which he served. Almond earned tremendous respect throughout his career for his work as a commander and military administrator from his superiors, including Gen. George C. Marshall and Gen. Douglas MacArthur, but his current reputation as the US Army's most virulent racist overshadows all of these accomplishments. Almond's attitude was not unique; racism pervaded both the Army and the United States of his day. His views reflected the dominant view of the rural white South where he grew up, and did not differ much from those of his more famous peers. Almond, however, would never accept the changes his contemporaries and the Army eventually acknowledged. Almond's reactionary posture stands in sharp contrast to the rest of his career, in which he distinguished himself as an innovator open to new ideas. This dissertation will attempt to reconcile that other Almond and show that there was more to him than his bigoted command policies. Almond's career paralleled these developments in American society and changes in the US Army. His highly professional attitude yet stubborn resistance to social change typified the senior military leadership of the era. When those racial attitudes began to change, Almond represented an increasingly outdated ideology that held black men were innately incapable of becoming good soldiers. At the end of a long life and successful career, Almond was better know for his repugnant racial attitudes that for his genuine successes. First, Almond performed better as the commander of the 92nd Division that is commonly reported, despite that unit's significant difficulties in combat. This dissertation will also explore how his experiences with the 92nd Division, and the Army's later desegregation decisions, embittered him toward black soldiers. Second, both success and failure marked his command of X Corps in Korea, and his personal relationships with other officers obscured some of his accomplishments. Third, while serving as commandant of the US Army War College, Almond would tap his rich store of military experience to push the Army toward a great commitment to joint operations
Steel and blood South Vietnamese armour and the war for Southeast Asia by Mai Việt Hà( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Colonel Ha Mai Viet presents a historically accurate and detailed account of the Vietnam War from the perspective of the South Vietnamese armored forces. Highly decorated for his valor and leadership of the armored units, he spent ten years documenting what went on so he could offer an analysis of the war based on facts. He interviewed hundreds of people, including all senior South Vietnamese officers involved and many of lesser rank, as well as American advisers. Viet tells the story without glossing over the shortcomings of his fellow soldiers. His efforts serve as an invaluable record of his army's organization, combat operations, and interaction with U.S. advisers. Colonel Viet provides background on himself and his family, then describes research for his history of the South Vietnamese armored force, publication of the book, and highlights of the account
Why the civil rights movement was an insurgency, and why it matters by Mark S Grimsley( Visual )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Most Americans fail to appreciate that the civil rights movement was about the overthrow of an entrenched political order in each of the southern states, that the segregationists who controlled this order did not hesitate to employ violence (law enforcement, paramilitary, mob) to preserve it, and that for nearly a century the federal government tacitly or overtly supported the segregationist state governments. That the civil rights movement employed nonviolent tactics should fool us no more than it did the segregationists, who correctly saw themselves as being at war. Significant change was never going to occur within the political system: it had to be forced. The aim of the segregationists was to keep the federal government on the sidelines. The aim of the civil rights movement was to "capture" the federal government to get it to apply its weight against the southern states. As to why it matters: a major reason we were slow to grasp the emergence and extent of the insurgency in Iraq is that it didn't, and doesn't, look like a classic insurgency. In fact, the official Department of Defense definition of insurgency still reflects a Vietnam-era understanding of the term. Looking at the civil rights movement as an insurgency is useful because it assists in thinking more comprehensively about the phenomenon of insurgency and assists in a more complete, and therefore more useful, definition of the term
"Sic 'Em, Ned": Edward M. Almond and His Army, 1916-1953 by Michael E Lynch( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ph.D
The changing character of war, 1775-2016 by Conrad C Crane( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The potential changes in the operating environment (OE) and the character of war in the next 15-20 years are unknowable and history cannot provide a predictive model or 'cookbook' to anticipate future events. The last 250 years, however, have provided many examples of shifts in the character of war caused by emerging technology, political shifts, economic changes and diplomatic crises. This context may prove very useful for senior leaders. There will doubtless be technological advances in the future, and some may be 'game changers.' Intellectual development is just as important as technological development. The Army learned during the interwar years between the world wars that maintaining intellectual capital was critical to later success. Technological change is constant, and all armies adapt to it, yet not all technological changes affect the character of war. The machine gun and the computer, for instance, revolutionized tactics, but had little effect beyond the battlefield. The advent of submarines, airplanes, and nuclear weapons, however, fundamentally altered how war is conducted—the character of war. These case studies address periods during which the character of war changed"--Executive summary
 
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English (24)