WorldCat Identities

Stevens, Gina

Overview
Works: 13 works in 17 publications in 2 languages and 33 library holdings
Classifications: PS3569.T45147,
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Gina Stevens Publications about Gina Stevens
Publications by  Gina Stevens Publications by Gina Stevens
Most widely held works by Gina Stevens
Privacy an overview of federal statutes governing wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping by Gina Stevens ( )
in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report provides an overview of federal law governing wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping. It also appends citations to state law in the area and contains a bibliography of legal commentary as well as the text of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). It is a federal crime to wiretap or to use a machine to capture the communications of others without court approval, unless one of the parties has given their prior consent. It is likewise a federal crime to use or disclose any information acquired by illegal wiretapping or electronic eavesdropping. Violations can result in imprisonment for not more than five years; fines up to $250,000 (up to $500,000 for organizations); in civil liability for damages, attorneys' fees and possibly punitive damages; in disciplinary action against any attorneys involved; and in suppression of any derivative evidence. Congress has created separate but comparable protective schemes for electronic communications (e.g., e-mail) and against the surreptitious use of telephone call monitoring practices such as pen registers and trap and trace devices. Each of these protective schemes comes with a procedural mechanism to afford limited law enforcement access to private communications and communications records under conditions consistent with the dictates of the Fourth Amendment. The government has been given even more narrowly confined authority to engage in electronic surveillance, conduct physical searches, install and use pen registers and trap and trace devices for law enforcement purposes under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act and for purposes of foreign intelligence gathering under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. This report includes a brief summary of the recently expired Protect America Act, P.L. 110-55 and of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 Amendments Act of 2008, P.L. 110-261 (H.R. 6304). It is available in an abridged form without footnotes, quotations, or appendices as CRS Report 98-327, Privacy: An Abbreviated Outline of Federal Statutes Governing Wiretapping and Electronic Eavesdropping, by Gina Marie Stevens and Charles Doyle. Both will be revised as circumstances warrant
The Obama Administration's cybersecurity proposal criminal provisions by Gina Stevens ( )
in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Responding to ongoing concerns over the state of U.S. cybersecurity, the Obama Administration released a report containing a proposal for significant cybersecurity legislation on May 12, 2011. The Administration's proposal contains seven sections and addresses many different subject areas. This report examines the first section of the Administration's proposal, dealing with criminal law. This report also compares the Administration's proposal to bills pending before the House of Representatives and the Senate. Although Congress is considering many bills addressing cybersecurity, there are relatively few which would modify computer crime laws such as the CFAA. The bills which do address computer crime differ in significant ways from the Administration's proposal, though they would accomplish some of the same goals
Collection of a Kirby cowgirl by Gina Stevens ( Book )
1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Freedom of Information Act and nondisclosure provisions in other federal laws by Gina Marie Stevens ( Book )
2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Congress continues to consider how to balance the federal government's growing need for sensitive or confidential business information, the public's right of access to information about government activities, and the private sector's interest in keeping its sensitive or proprietary information protected from public disclosure. In enacting the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552, Congress sought to balance the right of the public to know and the need of the government to protect certain information. FOIA?s broad provisions favoring disclosure, coupled with the specific exemptions, represent the balance Congress achieved. The federal FOIA is an information access statute enacted in 1966 that applies to agency records of the executive branch of the federal government. FOIA requires that certain types of records be published in the Federal Register, that certain types of records be made available for public inspection and copying, and that all other records be subject to request in writing. All records not available via publication or inspection, not exempt from disclosure, or excluded from coverage are subject to disclosure. Disputes over access to requested records may be reviewed in federal court where the burden is on the agency to sustain its action
Taps, bugs & telephony : an overview of federal statutes governing wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping by Gina Stevens ( Book )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Privacy : an abbreviated outline of federal statutes governing wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping by Gina Stevens ( )
2 editions published between 2001 and 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
It is a federal crime to intentionally wiretap or electronically eavesdrop on the conversation of another without a court order or the consent of one of the parties to the conversation. Moreover, in eleven states, it is a state crime for anyone other than the police to intentionally wiretap and/or electronically eavesdrop on the conversation of another without the consent of all of the parties to the conversation. The federal crimes are punishable by imprisonment for up to five years and expose offenders to civil liability for damages, attorneys' fees, and possibly punitive damages. State crimes carry similar consequences. Even in states where one party consent interceptions are legal, they may well be contrary to the professional obligations of members of the bar. The proscriptions often include a ban on using or disclosing the fruits of an illegal interception. Statutory exceptions to these general prohibitions permit judicially supervised wiretapping or electronic eavesdropping conducted for law enforcement or foreign intelligence gathering purposes. Similar regimes -- proscriptions with exceptions for government access under limited circumstances -- exist for telephone records, e-mail and other forms of electronic communications
Privacy : an overview of federal statutes governing wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping by Gina Marie Stevens ( )
2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report provides an overview of federal law governing wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping. It also appends citations to state law in the area and contains a bibliography of legal commentary as well as the text of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). It is a federal crime to wiretap or to use a machine to capture the communications of others without court approval, unless one of the parties has given their prior consent. It is likewise a federal crime to use or disclose any information acquired by illegal wiretapping or electronic eavesdropping. Violations can result in imprisonment for not more than five years; fines up to $250,000 (up to $500,000 for organizations); in civil liability for damages, attorneys' fees and possibly punitive damages; in disciplinary action against any attorneys involved; and in suppression of any derivative evidence. Congress has created separate but comparable protective schemes for electronic communications (e.g., e-mail) and against the surreptitious use of telephone call monitoring practices such as pen registers and trap and trace devices. Each of these protective schemes comes with a procedural mechanism to afford limited law enforcement access to private communications and communications records under conditions consistent with the dictates of the Fourth Amendment. The government has been given even more narrowly confined authority to engage in electronic surveillance, conduct physical searches, install and use pen registers and trap and trace devices for law enforcement purposes under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act and for purposes of foreign intelligence gathering under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. This report includes a brief summary of the recently expired Protect America Act, P.L. 110-55 and of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 Amendments Act of 2008, P.L. 110-261 (H.R. 6304). It is available in an abridged form without footnotes, quotations, or appendices as CRS Report 98-327, Privacy: An Abbreviated Outline of Federal Statutes Governing Wiretapping and Electronic Eavesdropping, by Gina Marie Stevens and Charles Doyle. Both will be revised as circumstances warrant
Privacy an overview of federal statutes governing wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping by Gina Stevens ( )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"This report provides an overview of federal law governing wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping. It also surveys state law in the area and contains a bibliography of legal commentary. It is a federal crime to wiretap or to use a machine to capture the communications of others without court approval, unless one of the parties has given their prior consent. It is likewise a federal crime to use or disclose any information acquired by illegal wiretapping or electronic eavesdropping. Violations can result in imprisonment for not more than 5 years; fines up to $250,000 (up to $500,000 for organizations); in civil liability for damages, attorneys fees and possibly punitive damages; in disciplinary action against any attorneys involved; and in suppression of any derivative evidence. Congress has created separate but comparable protective schemes for electronic mail (e-mail) and against the surreptitious use of telephone call monitoring practices such as pen registers and trap and trace devices."
The privacy and security provisions for health information in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 by Gina Stevens ( Book )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The cursed by Felix Setiawan ( Book )
1 edition published in 2013 in Indonesian and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Duet mawut : mendadak boyband by Galang Tirtakusuma ( Book )
1 edition published in 2013 in Indonesian and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Comic on youth life style in Indonesia
Panji by Fachreza Octavio ( Book )
1 edition published in 2013 in Indonesian and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Federal information security and data breach notification laws by Gina Marie Stevens ( )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The following report describes information security and data breach notification requirements included in the Privacy Act, the Federal Information Security Management Act, Office of Management and Budget Guidance, the Veterans Affairs Information Security Act, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, the Federal Trade Commission Act, and the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Also included in this report is a brief summary of the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), an industry regulation developed by VISA, MasterCard, and other bank card distributors. Information security laws are designed to protect personally identifiable information from compromise, unauthorized disclosure, unauthorized acquisition, unauthorized access, or other situations where unauthorized persons have access or potential access to personally identifiable information for unauthorized purposes. Data breach notification laws typically require covered entities to implement a breach notification policy, and include requirements for incident reporting and handling and external breach notification. During the 110th Congress, three data security bills--S. 239 (Feinstein), S. 495 (Leahy), and S. 1178 (Inouye)--were reported favorably out of Senate committees. Those bills include information security and data breach notification requirements. Several other data security bills were also introduced. The 109th and 110th Congresses did not pass data security legislation. In the 111th Congress, expectations are that efforts to move data security legislation will continue this year
 
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Alternative Names
GMS
Languages
English (14)
Indonesian (3)