WorldCat Identities

Novick, Lynn

Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Lynn Novick
The war by Ken Burns( Visual )

18 editions published between 2006 and 2012 in English and held by 2,844 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tells the story of ordinary people in four quintessentially American towns - Waterbury, Connecticut; Mobile, Alabama; Sacramento, California; and Luverne, Minnesota - and examines the ways in which the Second World War touched the lives of every family on every street in every town in America
The war : an intimate history, 1941-1945 by Geoffrey C Ward( Book )

3 editions published between 2007 and 2010 in English and held by 2,831 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As companion to the PBS series airing in September 2007, "The War" focuses on the citizens of four towns--Luverne, Minnesota; Sacramento, California; Waterbury, Connecticut; Mobile, Alabama, following more than forty people from 1941 to 1945. Maps and hundreds of photographs enrich this compelling, unflinching narrative
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

41 editions published between 2000 and 2011 in 3 languages and held by 2,510 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Episode 8. Between 1945 and 1955, jazz splinters into different camps: cool and hot, East and West, traditional and modern. One by one, the big bands leave the road, but Duke Ellington keeps his band together, while Louis Armstrong puts together a small group, the "All-Stars." Promoter Norman Granz insists on equal treatment for every member of his integrated troupes on his Jazz at the Philharmonic Tours. Meanwhile, bebop musicians Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker are creating some of the most inventive jazz ever played but a devastating narcotics plague sweeps through the jazz community, ruining lives and changing the dynamics of performance. And a number of great performers, including Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck, Gerry Mulligan, Thelonious Monk, Paul Desmond, Bille Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, and John Lewis, find new ways to bring new audiences to jazz
Prohibition by Ken Burns( Visual )

30 editions published between 2011 and 2015 in English and held by 2,366 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This videodisc explores the extraordinary story of what happens when a freedom-loving nation outlaws the sale of intoxicating liquor, and the disastrous unintended consequences that follow. The utterly relevant cautionary tale raises profound questions about the proper role of government and the limits of legislating morality. When the country goes dry in 1920, after a century of debate, millions of law-abiding Americans become lawbreakers overnight
Frank Lloyd Wright by Ken Burns( Visual )

53 editions published between 1997 and 2015 in 4 languages and held by 2,261 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Uses interviews and archival footage to tell the story of the melodramatic life and stunning architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright
Baseball by Don Kessinger( Visual )

35 editions published between 1994 and 2010 in English and held by 2,093 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It is an epic overflowing with heroes and hopefuls, scoundrels and screwballs. It is a saga spanning the quest for racial justice, the clash of labor and management, the transformation of popular culture, and the unfolding of the national pastime. Here is the story of a nation at work and play. Experience it in ten thrilling "innings" from master storyteller and award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns
The Roosevelts : an Intimate History( Visual )

3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 1,708 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Roosevelts: An Intimate History chronicles the lives of Theodore, Franklin, and Eleanor Roosevelt, three members of the most prominent and influential family in American politics. It is the first time in a major documentary television series that their individual stories have been interwoven into a single narrative. This seven-part, 14 hour film follows the Roosevelts for more than a century, from Theodore's birth in 1858 to Eleanor's death in 1962. Over the course of those years, Theodore would become the 26th President of the United States and his beloved niece, Eleanor, would marry his fifth cousin, Franklin, who became the 32nd President of the United States. Together, these three individuals not only redefined the relationship Americans had with their government and with each other, but also redefined the role of the United States within the wider world. The series encompasses the history the Roosevelts helped to shape: the creation of National Parks, the digging of the
The Vietnam War : an intimate history by Geoffrey C Ward( Book )

5 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 1,580 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A comprehensive look at the Vietnam War"--
The Vietnam War by Ken Burns( Visual )

7 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 1,507 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Vietnam War: A Film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick : Ken Burns and Lynn Novick's ten-part, 18-hour documentary series, The Vietnam War, tells the epic story of one of the most consequential, divisive, and controversial events in American history as it has never before been told on film. Visceral and immersive, the series explores the human dimensions of the war through revelatory testimony of nearly 80 witnesses from all sides -- Americans who fought in the war and others who opposed it, as well as combatants and civilians from North and South Vietnam. Ten years in the making, the series includes rarely seen, digitally re-mastered archival footage from sources around the globe, photographs taken by some of the most celebrated photojournalists of the 20th Century, historic television broadcasts, evocative home movies, and secret audio recordings from inside the Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon administrations. The Vietnam War features more than 100 iconic musical recordings from greatest artists of the era, and haunting original music from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross as well as the Silk Road Ensemble featuring Yo-Yo Ma"--Publisher
Baseball by Ken Burns( Visual )

9 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and held by 913 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It is an epic overflowing with heroes and hopefuls, scoundrels and screwballs. It is a saga spanning the quest for racial justice, the clash of labor and management, the transformation of popular culture, and the unfolding of the national pastime. Here is the story of a nation at work and play
Prohibition -Episode 2( Visual )

9 editions published between 2011 and 2015 in English and held by 512 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prohibition - Episode 1: A Nation of Drunkards Americans have argued over alcohol for centuries. Since the early years of the American Republic, drinking has been at least as American as apple pie. As Episode 1: A Nation of Drunkards begins, clergymen, craftsmen and canal-diggers drink. So do the crowds of men who turn out for barn-raisings and baptisms, funerals, elections and public hangings. Tankards of cider are kept by farmhouses' front doors, and in many places alcohol is considered safer to drink than water. Alcohol, along with its attendant rituals and traditions, is embedded in the fabric of American culture. But by 1830, the average American over fifteen years old consumes nearly seven gallons of pure alcohol a year, three times as much as we drink today. Alcohol abuse, mostly perpetrated by men, wreaks havoc on the lives of many families, and women, with few legal rights or protection, are utterly dependent on their husbands for sustenance and support. As a wave of spiritual fervor for reform sweeps the country, many women and men begin to see alcohol as a scourge, an impediment to a Protestant vision of clean and righteous living. Abolitionists, moralists, and some churches band together for temperance. But by 1860, the movement, like women's suffrage and other reforms of the day, finds itself overshadowed - first by the mounting struggle over slavery and then by the Civil War fought to settle it. In the 1870s, the country's population swells with immigrants, who bring their drinking customs with them from Ireland, Germany, Italy, and other European countries. In towns and cities, brewery-owned saloons compete for customers, spawning vice districts in some places and terrifying the old, rural, Protestant America. To many, the saloon is the poor immigrant's living room where he can find work or companionship, but to others the saloon is a place where men squander their paychecks, contract diseases from prostitutes, and stagger out into the street to threaten society. In 1873, in the small town of Hillsboro, Ohio a group of women band together in an act of radical civil disobedience that spreads across the nation. They block the entrances of saloons and taverns, praying and singing until the bartenders agree to close up. The temperance campaign ignites again, spearheaded by the Woman's Christian Temperance Union. Carrie Nation and her Home Defenders Army bring publicity by attacking Kansas bars with stones and hatchets, while around the country hardworking activists succeed in convincing many counties to go dry with "local-option" laws. The Anti-Saloon League (ASL) forms to push for an amendment to the Constitution outlawing alcohol nationally. Led by a ruthless Wayne Wheeler, the ASL becomes the most successful single-issue lobbying organization in American history, willing to form alliances with Republicans, Democrats, Progressives, the Klu Klux Klan, the NAACP, industrialists and populists. The ASL quickly proves it has the power to oust politicians who dare to speak out against Prohibition. With the ratification of the income tax amendment in 1913, the federal government is no longer dependent on liquor taxes to fund its operations, and the ASL moves into high gear. As anti-German fervor rises to a near frenzy with the American entry into the First World War, ASL propaganda effectively connects beer and brewers with Germans and treason in the public mind. Most politicians dare not defy the ASL and in 1917 the 18th Amendment sails through both Houses of Congress; it is ratified by the states in just 13 months. At 12:01 A.M. on January 17, 1920, the amendment goes into effect and Prohibitionists rejoice that at long last, America has become officially, and (they hope) irrevocably, dry. But just a few minutes later, six masked bandits with pistols empty two freight cars full of whiskey from a rail yard in Chicago, another gang steals four casks of grain alcohol from a government bonded warehouse, and still another hijacks a truck carrying whiskey. Americans are about to discover that making Prohibition the law of the land has been one thing; enforcing it will be another
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

14 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 350 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Traces the origins of jazz to New Orleans during the 1890's, focusing on the individual musicians such as Buddy Bolden, Jelly Roll Morton and Sidney Bechet, who helped shape its development
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

14 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 345 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the late 1930s, as the Great Depression deepens, jazz thrives. The saxophone emerges as an iconic instrument of the music; this segment introduces two of its masters, Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young. Young migrates to Kansas City, where a vibrant music scene is prospering with musicians such as trumpeter Harry "Sweets" Edison and drummers Jo Jones and Chick Webb. Out of this ferment emerges pianist Count Basie, who forms a band that epitomizes the Kansas City sound. Billie Holiday cuts recordings while other women musicians, including pianist Mary Lou Williams and singer Ella Fitzgerald emerge on the jazz scene. Benny Goodman holds the first-ever jazz concert at Carnegie Hall while Duke Ellington tours Europe
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

13 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 342 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the mid 1930s, as the Great Depression refuses to lift, Benny Goodman finds himself hailed as the "King of Swing" and becomes the first white bandleader to hire black musicians. He has a host or rivals among them, Chick Webb, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmie Lunceford, Glen Miller and Artie Shaw. Louis Armstrong heads a big band of his own, while Duke Ellington continues his independent course, but great black artists still can't eat or sleep in many of the hotels where they perform. Billie Holiday emerges from a childhood of tragedy to begin her career as the greatest of all female jazz singers
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

14 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 339 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Between 1945 and 1955, jazz splinters into different camps: cool and hot, East and West, traditional and modern. One by one, the big bands leave the road, but Duke Ellington keeps his band together, while Louis Armstrong puts together a small group, the "All-Stars." Promoter Norman Granz insists on equal treatment for every member of his integrated troupes on his Jazz at the Philharmonic Tours. Meanwhile, bebop musicians Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker are creating some of the most inventive jazz ever played but a devastating narcotics plague sweeps through the jazz community, ruining lives and changing the dynamics of performance. And a number of great performers, including Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck, Gerry Mulligan, Thelonious Monk, Paul Desmond, Bille Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, and John Lewis, find new ways to bring new audiences to jazz
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

13 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 335 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

America is in the midst of the Great Depression, with jazz called upon to lift the spirits of a frightened country. Benny Goodman, struggling to howld his band together, embarks on a disastrous cross-country tour. In the Palomar Ballroom in Los Angeles, however, young people go wild when Goodman's men begin to play the jazz they love, and the Swing Era is born
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

11 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 328 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the 1960s jazz fragments into the avant-garde and many divided schools of thought. Many jazz musicians like Dexter Gordon are forced to leave America in search of work while other use the music as a form of social protest: Max Roach, Charles Mingus, and Archie Shepp make overtly political musical statements. John Coltrane appeals to a broad audience before his untimely death. Saxophonist Stan Getz helps boost a craze for bossa nova music, but in the early 1970s jazz founders Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington pass away. Miles Davis leads a movement of jazz musicians who incorporate elements of rock and soul into their music and "fusion" wins listeners. By the mid-1980's jazz begins to bounce back led by Wynton Marsalis and a new generation of musicians. Now as it approaches its centennial, jazz is still alive, still changing and still swinging
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

13 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 328 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From 1917 through 1924 the "Jazz Age" begins with speakeasies, flappers and easy money for some. The story of jazz becomes a tale of two cities, Chicago and New York and of Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, whose lives and music will span three-quarters of a century. This episode also follows the careers of jazz greats James Reese Europe, King Oliver, Willie Smith, Fletcher Henderson, Paul Whiteman and James P. Johnson
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

11 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 328 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Jazz video series by Ken Burns traces the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans to its heights and continuing presence. When America enters World War II in 1941, jazz music goes to war, too. Swing becomes a symbol of democracy at home and entertainers like Dave Brubeck, Glenn Miller and Artie Shaw take their music to the men and women of the armed forces overseas. In Nazi-occupied Europe, where the gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt develops his own distinctive way of playing the music, jazz becomes a symbol of freedom and the hope of liberation. In New York, the heart of jazz has moved from Harlem to 52nd Street -- where Billie Holiday reigns as unofficial queen despite a growing addiction to narcotics. Duke Ellington leads what some believe to have been the greatest of all his bands -- helped now by the gifted young arranger, Billy Strayhorn -- and brings his music to ever-greater heights. Meanwhile, underground and after-hours, a small band of gifted young musicians led by the trumpet virtuoso Dizzy Gillespie and saxophonists Charlie Parker and Ben Webster begin to develop a new way of playing -- fast, intricate, and infinitely demanding for musicians and listeners alike. Due to a recording ban it goes largely unheard until November of 1945, when Parker and Gillespie are finally able to go into the recording studio together. With the release of "Koko" the new music called bebop begins to spread, and with Louis Armstrong's influence, jazz becomes rhythm and blues, altering the course of jazz forever. Meanwhile in 1945, black soldiers return home to the same racism they fought against, and a growing unrest sets the seeds for future rebellions
Jazz by Ken Burns( Visual )

13 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 327 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

By 1924 to 1928 jazz is everywhere in America and spreading abroad. For the first time, soloists and singers take center stage, transforming the music with their distinctive voices. This episode traces the careers of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Artie Shaw, Sidney Bechet, Bessie Smith, Earl Hines, Ethel Waters, Bix Beiderbecke, the first great white jazz artist, and Benny Goodman, the son of Jewish immigrants
 
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Audience level: 0.15 (from 0.08 for The war : ... to 0.27 for Prohibitio ...)

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The war : an intimate history, 1941-1945
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