WorldCat Identities

Smith, C. Wayne

Overview
Works: 21 works in 43 publications in 2 languages and 2,038 library holdings
Genres: History  Catalogs  Dissertations, Academic 
Roles: Author, Thesis advisor
Classifications: CC135, 930.1028
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by C. Wayne Smith
Archaeological conservation using polymers : practical applications for organic artifact stabilization by C. Wayne Smith( Book )

11 editions published in 2003 in English and Undetermined and held by 249 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Working with Dow Corning Corporation, Texas A & M's Archaeological Preservation Research Lab (APRL), and the Conservation Research Lab (CRL), Smith and his colleagues in AS & M's Nautical Archaeology Program set out to develop a series of chemistries and techniques that would provide successful and affordable treatment strategies for organic materials. In this ground-breaking description of the processes and materials that were developed, Smith explains these techniques in ways that will allow museums and historical societies to conserve more stable artifacts for traveling exhibits and interactive displays and will allow researchers to conserve new discoveries without sacrificing important information."
The final analysis of weights from Port Royal, Jamaica by C. Wayne Smith( Book )

12 editions published in 1997 in English and Italian and held by 84 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cotton cultivar tests for 1991 in Central and South Texas by C. Wayne Smith( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gossypol by E. Murl Bailey( Book )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cotton cultivar tests for 1987 in Central and South Texas by C. W Smth( Book )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cotton cultivar tests for 1990 in Central & South Texas by C. Wayne Smith( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cotton cultivar tests for 1988 in Central and South Texas( Book )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cotton cultivar tests for 1986 in Central and South Texas by C. Wayne Smith( Book )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cotton cultivar tests for 1992 in Central and South Texas( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Analysis of the weight assemblage of Port Royal, Jamaica by C. Wayne Smith( )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Arkansas cotton cultivar tests, 1977 by Chauncy D Harris( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Genetic Analysis, Inheritance and Stability of Mutation-based Herbicide Tolerance in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) by George Sherrod Cutts( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The evolution of herbicide-resistant weed species in cotton production has created a need for new herbicide technology tools. Herbicide technologies not classified as genetically modified by recombinant DNA can provide tools with less associated registration and development costs and regulatory and market barriers. Research herein aims to advance herbicide crop tolerance through improvement and genetic analysis of mutation derived herbicide tolerance in cotton. Germplasm exhibiting elevated tolerance to the imidazolinone class of herbicides has been previously identified after mutagenesis with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). However, the physiological basis, genetic behavior, and potential for herbicide tolerance improvement are not fully understood and studies were designed to elucidate these factors. Three lines (EM₄-3-1-1, EM₄-3-1-2, and SCM₃-4-3-1) show high levels of imazamox tolerance. Data indicate that yield for all EMS treated lines was equal to or greater than their respective non-EMS treated cultivar. EMS treatment had no adverse effects on other cotton fiber properties. In 2012, levels of imazamox herbicide injury were seen at 14 days after application (DAA) ranging from 25-34 per cent. A greater level of injury was observed in 2013 ranging from 30-37% 7 DAA, and from 60-68% 14 DAA. Injury was transient throughout both growing seasons. Acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene sequencing characterized a mutation at Ala122 that is classified as conferring tolerance to imidazolinone herbicides, but was inconsistent in lines evaluated. Sequencing also revealed lines that have a truncated form of the protein in this region that may inhibit imidazolinone binding to the ALS protein. Chi-square analysis indicated this trait behaves in a simple, dominant fashion. Data from parent-offspring regression analysis indicated moderate correlation between parents and F₂ progeny (53%). Correlation is relatively high between F₂ and F₃3 progeny (84%) and demonstrates a strong relationship between these generations. Gain from selection indicates a 13.6% improvement in herbicide tolerance, lending to low progress from selection. These studies have shown that non-transgenic breeding methods can confer and improve imidazolinone herbicide tolerance in cotton, though levels of imidazolinone herbicide injury remained commercially unacceptable. The electronic version of this dissertation is accessible from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151805
Analysis of the weight assemblage of Port Royal, Jamica by C. Wayne Smith( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Proinsulin-producing macrophages infiltrate obese adipose tissue and underlie insulin resistance by Eric Dale Buras( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Genetics of Cotton Fiber Elongation by Eng Hwa Ng( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Fiber elongation (ability to stretch before breaking) is one of the key components in determining overall yarn quality. Elongation in U.S. upland cotton (G. hirsutum L.) has remained largely neglected due to: absence of monetary incentives for growers to produce high elongation cotton; lack of research interests among breeders; and absence of a reliable fiber testing system for elongation. This study was conducted to determine the genetics of cotton fiber elongation via a diallel and generation means analysis (GMA). Findings from this study should lay the foundation for future breeding work in cotton fiber elongation. Of the seven distinctive upland parents used for the diallel study, general combining ability was far more prominent than specific combing ability for fiber elongation. Cultivar PSC 355 and Dever experimental line were the two parents identified as good combiners for fiber elongation in this study. The slight negative correlation between fiber elongation and strength remained true. Highly significant negative correlation was observed between fiber upper half mean length and elongation. Both Stelometer and HVI elongation measurements correlated well with values of 0.85 and 0.82 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. For the six families used in the GMA analysis, additive genetic control was prevalent over dominance effect. Based on the scaling test, no significant epistatic interaction was detected for fiber elongation. As expected, additive variance constituted a much larger portion of total genetic variation in fiber elongation than the dominance variance. On average, larger numbers of effective factor were identified in fiber elongation than all other fiber traits tested, suggesting that parents used in the GMA study are carrying different genetic materials/ loci for fiber elongation. Considerable gains in fiber elongation may be achieved by selectively crossing these materials in a pure-line breeding scheme while holding other important fiber traits constant. The electronic version of this dissertation is accessible from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151034
Determining the degree of compliance to Minnesota's Pupil Fair Dismissal Act of 1974 within nine west suburban schools by C. Wayne Smith( )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Cotton cultivar tests 1985 by C. Wayne Smith( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Inheritance of Cotton Fiber Length and Strength by Kolbyn Seth Joy( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The U.S. cotton industry has become predominantly an export market which requires a higher standard of fiber quality than does the domestic market. To remain competitive, U.S. cotton must meet the quality standards demanded by the consumers of raw cotton whether domestic or abroad. Diallel and generation means analyses (GMA) were conducted on fiber quality data of nine and five parental genotypes, respectively, to gain a better understanding of the genetic control of cotton fiber length and strength as well as to ascertain the value of the reported genotypes toward the improvement of fiber quality. Parental genotypes included extra-long staple uplands (Gossypium hirsutum, L.), EMS mutated uplands, high strength uplands, and interspecific hybrids. General combining ability (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) were estimated according to Griffing's diallel Model I, Method 4 for lint percent, high volume instrument (HVI) upper half mean length (UHML), fiber bundle strength (Str), uniformity index, elongation, micronaire, advanced fiber information system (AFIS) upper quartile length on a weight basis, mean length on a number basis, short fiber content on a number basis, immature fiber content, maturity ratio, and standard fineness. Estimates of GCA were significant across environments for all traits. SCA effects were significant for most traits but accounted for a smaller proportion of the variability in comparison to GCA effects. TAM B182-33 ELS would be the parent of choice to simultaneously improve fiber length and Str. The GMA was conducted on the parental, F₁, F₂, and backcross generations. Low levels of transgressive segregation for both UHML and Str were observed for some populations. Broad sense heritability ranged from 0.00 to 0.67 for UHML and from 0.22 to 0.82 for Str. Additive gene action was significant for all but three parental combinations for UHML and for all parental combinations for Str. Generally, the significance and magnitude of additive genetic effects were more consistent among parental combinations and years than were non-additive genetic effects for both UHML and Str. Dominance and epistatic genetic effects often were of a greater magnitude than additive genetic effects but in an inconsistent manner, and in both positive and negative directions. The electronic version of this dissertation is accessible from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/152743
Single Plant Selection as a Screening Method for Resistance to Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium ultimum in Cotton by Whitney Minton Jones( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Upland cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., is grown extensively in the southern United States with an annual farmgate value of $6 billion and an annual national economic impact of over $120 billion. Damage due to biotic pests, including what is known as the cotton seedling disease complex (CSDC), contribute to these losses. Two particular CSDC pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium ultimum, are the most significant soilborne pathogens of cotton in the United States. A program for R. solani and P. ultimum resistant cotton germplasm was established at Texas A&M University AgriLife Research. Five germplasm families selected for elevated levels of condensed tannins were evaluated for resistance to R. solani and P. ultimum. Two generations of single plant selections resulted in three generations, C₀ (original families or Cycle 0) C₁, selected from the C₀ family, and C₂, selected from the C₁ generation. C₁ and C₂ were putative resistant families after one or two generation(s) of selection, respectively. Individual plants from the three generations within five families were challenged with either or both R. solani or P. ultimum to evaluate the progress of single plant selection for resistance. A susceptible cultivar for R. solani- and P. ultimum-resistance respectively, were included. Different R. solani and P. ultimum families from each generation of selection were evaluated at three inoculation levels with four replications per family. Differences in level of resistance between each generation were evaluated by comparing disease level in a randomized complete block. Cross-resistance was evaluated, i.e., C₂ families originally screened under R. solani pressure were inoculated and screened for P. ultimum resistance and vice versa. Individual plant selection (IPS) in an artificial environment may be a useful and important tool in developing seedling disease-resistant cotton germplasm. Furthermore, it can be concluded that the family evaluated is of importance to determine the amount of progress made in terms of disease resistance with IPS. Individual plant selection when challenged with appropriate levels R. solani and P. ultimum appears to be an effective tool for selection of germplasm resistant to these seedling disease causing pathogens. The electronic version of this dissertation is accessible from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/152610
Structure, Function, and Regulation of Molecules Involved in Leukocyte Adhesion Proceedings of the Second International Conference on: "Structure and Function of Molecules Involved in Leukocyte Adhesion II" by Peter E Lipsky( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Leukocyte adhesion molecules have been the subject of intense basic and preclinical research. Results from clinical trials obtained sofar with antibodies directed towards these surface proteins offer promise for the prevention of graft rejection and effective treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory disease. This volume presents a comprehensive review of contemporary research on the structure, function and regulation of leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands, from the molecular to the clinical level. The blend of basic science and clinical applications presented in Structure, Function and Regulation of Molecules Involved in Leukocyte Adhesion provides clear evidence of the biological importance of cell-cell interactions and the many potential clinical dividends afforded by understanding the molecular basis of cell adhesion. It will appeal to a broad range of readers in immunology and cell biology
 
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Archaeological conservation using polymers : practical applications for organic artifact stabilization
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