WorldCat Identities

Coffee, John 1772-1833

Overview
Works: 74 works in 79 publications in 2 languages and 177 library holdings
Genres: Treaties  Maps  Manuscript maps  Interviews  History  Court decisions and opinions 
Roles: Author, Speaker
Classifications: HD2741, 658.4
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by John Coffee
Dyas collection of John Coffee papers by Robert Dyas( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The outgoing correspondence of John Coffee is addressed predominantly to members of his family. Other family members whose letters are included are Alexander Donelson Coffee, John Donelson Coffee, Mary Donelson Coffee, Mary Coffee Mays, and Messaniah Coffee Wells-Moseley. The Martin family is represented by 45 letters, primarily of James G. Martin, brother-in-law of Mrs. John Coffee. There is also correspondence of Andrew Jackson Hutchings, a ward of Andrew Jackson. Other correspondents include William Preston Anderson, James Bright, John Donelson, Stockley Donelson, John Henry Eaton, William B. Lewis, John C. McLemore, and James K. Polk
Town of Fort Jackson, Alabama, 1860 by John Coffee( )

1 edition published in 1860 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Claiborne, Alabama by John Coffee( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Facility survey and analysis for Northern Lights School, Yukon Flats School District by John Coffee( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Charlie Rose Show( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ron Insana hosts two panel discussions that look at business scandals. WorldCom Panel: Jared Sandberg, Stephanie Mehta, and Allan Sloan ; Business Ethics Panel: David Boies, Arthur Levitt, John Coffee Jr., and Peter Peterson
John Coffee letter to William Harris Crawford by John Coffee( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Letter, dated Nashville, July 20, 1817, regarding accounts he forwarded to the Department of War for expenses incurred while "running the lines of the Creek cession."
Gatekeepers : the professions and corporate governance by John C Coffee( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in German and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

John Coffee traces the evolution of the four main gatekeeping professions: auditors, lawyers, securities analysts and credit-rating agencies, in the wake of corporate governance disasters, such as Enron and WorldCom
Plan of the town of Marathon, Ala by John Coffee( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Letter, 1832 May 6, Etowah, [Cherokee Nation] to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville, Georgia by John Coffee( )

1 edition published in 1832 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter dated May 6, 1832 from John Coffee in Etowah to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), regarding the Georgia land surveyors employed in Cherokee territory. Coffee reports that the Cherokees have been very friendly towards the surveyors. He also reports that Colonel Williamson has informed him that around one hundred people were found digging gold near Sweetwater Creek and that he has sent Sergeant Ray with a detachment to stop them. Coffee complains that they have had much trouble keeping Indians from mining gold since a recent decision by the Supreme Court (probably the case of Worcester v. Georgia). Coffee closes the letter with a promise to send Sergeant Ray to check on the progress of the surveyors near the North Carolina and Tennessee borders
Letter [with sworn statement], 1832 Jan. 31, Gainesville, Georgia, to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville, Georgia by John Coffee( )

1 edition published in 1832 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter from General John Coffee dated January 31, 1832 to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), regarding a land dispute between several white men and Cherokee leader George M. Waters. Coffee tells the governor that he thinks that Waters has no legitimate claim to the land in question, although he includes with his letter a sworn statement by one of Waters' employees, Martin Brannon, arguing his employer's case. Coffee also tells the governor that the renting of former Cherokee lands has been going very well, and he estimates that the rented land, which covers five counties, will bring in a revenue of about ten thousand dollars. Other documents related to this dispute are tcc700, tcc701, and tcc703
[Address to the Chickasaw Nation] : Franklin, Ten., Dec. 30, 1831 by United States( )

1 edition published in 1831 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

[Letter] 1819 Feb. 4, Jacksonville, Telfa[i]r [County, Georgia to] William Rabun, Georgia by John Coffee( )

1 edition published in 1819 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter from John Coffee, a Georgia state senator, to William Rabun, Governor of Georgia (1817-1819), requesting that a friend be appointed district surveyor. The candidate is experienced and has recently been engaged with running the boundary line between the state of Georgia and an unnamed group of Indians
Letter, 1832 July 21, Head Quarters, [Etowah], Ch[erokee Nation] to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor [of Georgia], Milledgeville, Georgia by John Coffee( )

1 edition published in 1832 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This letter, dated July 21, 1832 from General John Coffee to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), relates to the arrest and trial of Mr. Brown, one of the Georgia surveyors in Cherokee territory. Coffee reports that Cherokee leader John Ross directed James McNair, Nicholas McNair, and Rily Thornton to arrest Brown and try him for violating the Intercourse Law of 1802. Brown was arrested and taken to Tennessee to be tried, but his case was dismissed by Judge Keith. Coffee says that he has already explained to the governor his reasons for delaying the arrest of the persons involved in seizing Brown. He also tells the governor that Cherokee chiefs in that area are in favor of a treaty and that Colonel Williamson has been travelling the Cherokee territory to rouse support for it
Letter, 1832 Feb. 5, Etowah, C[herokee] N[ation] to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville by John Coffee( )

1 edition published in 1832 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter dated February 5, 1832 from John Coffee at Etowah (Cherokee Nation) to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), informing the governor that he has decided to rent former Cherokee lands near gold mines in northern Georgia to the highest bidder. He says that this plan is indispensable as there are many applicants for each place for rent. He complains that his few attempts to rent lands through private contracts have been troublesome. Coffee closes the letter by alleging that the Indians in the area are making some efforts to dig gold and that their attempts are a nuisance. He plans to station a detachment of troops nearby in order to prevent them from making any further efforts to mine the gold
[Letter] 1832 Jan. 9, Winns Ferry, [Georgia] to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville by John Coffee( )

1 edition published in 1832 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter dated January 9, 1832 from John Coffee at Winns Ferry on the Chattahoochee River to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), informing the governor that he has just arrived there and that he has already received numerous complaints about Indians in the area. He asks the governor's advice on one case in particular that concerns a white man who rented land from an Indian man. While he was renting the land, the white tenant added acreage to the land and, at the termination of his lease, the Indian took back all of the lands, including that added by his white tenant. The white man hired a lawyer who has in turn consulted Coffee
Letter, 1832 Mar. 3, Camp Lumpkin, to Governor Wilson Lumpkin, Milledgeville, Georgia by John Coffee( )

2 editions published in 1832 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter dated March 3, 1832 from John Coffee to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), regarding the efforts to remove the Cherokee Indians from the state of Georgia. Coffee reports that he has conversed with numerous Cherokee leaders respecting their delegation in Washington, and the anticipated outcomes of congressional deliberations on the subject. Coffee then goes on to discuss ways to convince the Cherokees to emigrate. He expresses his confidence that most of the Cherokees will agree to enroll for emigration by October. Coffee goes on to boast of the popularity of the Georgia Guard amongst the Cherokees, and he criticizes the efforts of some to destroy his reputation. He makes reference to two missionaries to the Cherokees (Elizur Butler and Samuel Worcester) imprisoned by the guard and remarks that he has declined to auction off their property considering the move very impolitic at presen
Copy of Report of General John Coffee on the boundary line between the Creeks and Cherokees, 1829, Dec. 30, Florence, Alabama, [to] John H. Eaton by John Coffee( )

1 edition published in 1829 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a copy of a report dated December 30, 1829 from General John Coffee in Florence, Alabama to Secretary of War John H. Eaton regarding the boundary line between the Creek and Cherokee Nations in Georgia. Coffee's job was to ascertain, at Eaton's request, the true boundary line between those two Indian nations and the state of Georgia, and he details his travels and interviews with both Indians and white settlers about the true location of the boundary line. He mentions several documents given to him by Cherokee leader John Ross in support of the Cherokee claim about the boundary, including a copy of the Cherokee Phoenix that contained Ross's letter to Colonel (Hugh) Montgomery regarding Cherokee land claims. These enclosures do not survive with his report. Coffee goes on to express his opinions about where the line should be, asserting that Cherokees and Creeks had long shared common hunting grounds, that they had never seen fit to draw any boundary lines until 1821 when they drew a line from the Buzzard Roost (Georgia) to Wills Creek (Alabama), and that the Creeks had admitted giving certain lands over to the Cherokees long ago. The Cherokees had then settled those lands and had long been in possession of them. The state of Georgia's claims to those lands, Coffee concludes, have little evidence to support them
[Letter] 1832 May 13, Etowah, [Cherokee Nation] to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor [of Georgia], Milledgeville, Georgia by John Coffee( )

1 edition published in 1832 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter dated May 13, 1832 from General John Coffee in Etowah (Cherokee Nation) to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia (1831-1835). Coffee reports that Colonel Williamson has not yet found the persons accused of illegally digging gold near the Carroll County line, so he proposes to station Sergeant Ray and a small detachment in the area to deter any further activity. He goes on to report that a Mr. Tait recently killed an Indian for stealing hogs. Coffee says that he regrets the incident and does not yet know if other Indians in the area will attempt to avenge this death. He cites this concern as yet another reason for stationing Sergeant Ray and his detachment in that area. Coffee closes the letter by noting that most of the surveys of the Cherokee land in northern Georgia are going well
Letter, 1832 Feb. 18, Etowah, Ch[erokee] Na[tion], to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville by John Coffee( )

1 edition published in 1832 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter dated February 18, 1832 from John Coffee in Etowah (Cherokee Nation) to Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), promising the governor that the Indians preparing to emigrate will be provided with the necessary protection to ensure their safe arrival at the Cherokee Agency. Coffee also says that more and more Indians in the area (near the mines in northern Georgia) are agreeing to leave peacefully and that a delegation of Cherokees currently in Washington have encouraged them to enter into a treaty providing for a mass emigration
 
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Gatekeepers : the professions and corporate governance
Alternative Names
John Coffee général américain

John R. Coffee US-amerikanischer General, Landvermesser und Pflanzer

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Languages
English (44)

German (1)

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