WorldCat Identities

Tholen, David J. (David James) 1955-

Overview
Works: 7 works in 12 publications in 1 language and 264 library holdings
Genres: Classification 
Roles: Author
Classifications: QB701, 523.482
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  David J Tholen Publications about David J Tholen
Publications by  David J Tholen Publications by David J Tholen
Most widely held works by David J Tholen
Pluto and Charon ( Book )
4 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 187 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Asteroid taxonomy from cluster analysis of photometry by David J Tholen ( )
3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Four E-class asteroids are now known to exist in the main belt, yet nearly twice this number exist in or near the Hungaria region. Twenty eight D-class asteroids have been identified in the outer belt, where they represent a significant fraction of the population. Five D asteroids exist in the main belt, which one lying near the inner edge of the belt, which is dominated by S-class asteroids. Two of the interesting minor classes are associated with particular dynamical families. The Nysa family, with the single exception of Nysa itself, consists entirely of class F asteroids, while the B asteroids are found almost exclusively in the Themis family. The earth-approaching population is represented by at least two objects similar to Vesta and Dembowska, which are as many as are in the entire main belt, while most of the earth-approachers are of class S
Observations of Planet Crossing Asteroids ( )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This grant funds the investigation of the Solar System's planet crossing asteroid population, principally the near Earth and trans-Neptunian objects, but also the Centaurs. Investigations include colorimetry at both visible and near infrared wavelengths, light curve photometry, astrometry, and a pilot project to find near Earth objects with small aphelion distances, which requires observations at small solar elongations
Report of the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements : 2009 by B. A Archinal ( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
"Every three years the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements revises tables giving the directions of the poles of rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, minor planets, and comets. This report takes into account the IAU Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN) and the IAU Committee on Small Body Nomenclature (CSBN) definition of dwarf planets, introduces improved values for the pole and rotation rate of Mercury, returns the rotation rate of Jupiter to a previous value, introduces improved values for the rotation of five satellites of Saturn, and adds the equatorial radius of the Sun for comparison. It also adds or updates size and shape information for the Earth, Mars' satellites Deimos and Phobos, the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter, and 22 satellites of Saturn. Pole, rotation, and size information has been added for the asteroids (21) Lutetia, (511) Davida, and (2867) Steins. Pole and rotation information has been added for (2) Pallas and (21) Lutetia. Pole and rotation and mean radius information has been added for (1) Ceres. Pole information has been updated for (4) Vesta. The high precision realization for the pole and rotation rate of the Moon is updated. Alternative orientation models for Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn are noted. The Working Group also reaffirms that once an observable feature at a defined longitude is chosen, a longitude definition origin should not change except under unusual circumstances. It is also noted that alternative coordinate systems may exist for various (e.g. dynamical) purposes, but specific cartographic coordinate system information continues to be recommended for each body. The Working Group elaborates on its purpose, and also announces its plans to occasionally provide limited updates to its recommendations via its website, in order to address community needs for some updates more often than every 3 years. Brief recommendations are also made to the general planetary community regarding the need for controlled products, and improved or consensus rotation models for Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn."
Erratum to: Reports of the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements : 2006 & 2009 by B. A Archinal ( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
"The primary poles for (243) Ida and (134340) Pluto and its satellite (134340) Pluto : I Charon were redefined in the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements (WGCCRE) 2006 report (Seidelmann et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astr 98:155, 2007), and 2009 report (Archinal et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astr 109:101, 2011), respectively, to be consistent with the primary poles of similar Solar System bodies. However, the WGCCRE failed to take into account the effect of the redefinition of the poles on the values of the rotation angle W at J2000.0. The revised relationships in Table 3 of Archinal et al. 2011) are W & = & 274°.05 +1864°.6280070 d{for (243) Ida} W & = & 302°.695 + 56°.3625225 d{for (134340) Pluto, and} W & = & 122°.695 + 56°.3625225 d{for (134340) Pluto : I Charon} where d is the time in TDB days from J2000.0 (JD2451545.0)."
ASTEROID TAXONOMY FROM CLUSTER ANALYSIS OF PHOTOMETRY by David J Tholen ( )
1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In the last few years, two major contributions to the asteroid database have been the eight-color and thermal radiometric surveys. The former consists of broad-band photometric measurements through eight filters spanning the 0.3 to 1.1 μm wavelength range. The latter consists of thermal flux measurements at 10 and/or 20 μm, and when combined with measures of the reflected light, can yield reliable estimates of their geometric albedos. Visual display of the eight-color survey data can be simplified by reducing the dimensionality of the problem. A principal components analysis was performed to accomplish this task. The analysis shows that 95 percent of the information contained in the seven independent color indices is contained in two principal components. This result is due to the fact that most asteroid spectra can be explained in terms of two absorption features, one at ultraviolet and the other at near-infrared wavelengths. The photometric and radiometric data sets were also used, along with cluster analysis techniques, to produce an improved asteroid taxonomic system. Seven major classes are now recognized and are designated A, C, D, E, M, P, and S. Three interesting minor classes are also identified: B, F, and G. Marginal evidence for an eighth major class, here called T, exists in the data, but the reality of this class awaits confirmation by further observations of potential members. Three asteroids do not fall into any of the above classes and are assigned unique designations: R (349 Dembowska), Q (1862 Apollo), and V (4 Vesta). Four E-class asteroids are now known to exist in the main belt, yet nearly twice this number exist in or near the Hungaria region. Twenty eight D-class asteroids have been identified in the outer belt, where they represent a significant fraction of the population. Five D asteroids exist in the main belt, which one lying near the inner edge of the belt, which is dominated by S-class asteroids. Two of the interesting minor classes are
 
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Languages
English (12)
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