WorldCat Identities

Hamilton, Joseph G. (Joseph Gilbert) 1907-

Overview
Works: 51 works in 153 publications in 1 language and 1,093 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other, Contributor
Classifications: RM300, 615.1 S
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Joseph G Hamilton
 
Most widely held works by Joseph G Hamilton
Carrier-free radioisotopes from cyclotron targets by Warren Manford Garrison( Book )

29 editions published between 1949 and 1950 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The accumulation, metabolism, and biological effects of astatine in rats and monkeys by Joseph G Hamilton( Book )

2 editions published in 1953 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Carrier-free radioisotopes from cyclotron targets : VI. Preparation and isolation of Ag¹⁰⁵, ¹⁰⁶, ¹¹¹ from palladium by Herman R Haymond( Book )

4 editions published in 1950 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The role of cyclotron in medical research by Joseph G Hamilton( Book )

4 editions published in 1950 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The uses of radioactive isotopes in medical research can be conveniently divided into three principal categories; namely, the applications as tracers for the study of metabolic phenomena, as diagnostic aids in clinical medicine, and finally their role in therapy. Frequently radioisotopes available from the chain-reacting pile do not have a sufficient degree of specific activity for satisfactory use. A number of radioisotopes which can be produced with high specific activity in the pile possess half-lives too short to be of any practical value. Then, there are a few cases in which the desired radioisotope may be made in the pile with high specific activity, but concomitantly there is formed another radioisotope of the same element whose half-life is of such duration as to render its use hazardous in man. Finally, there are several elements of biological and medical interest whose radioactive isotopes can be produced only by the cyclotron
Carrier-free radioisotopes from cyclotron targets by Jeanne D Gile( Book )

20 editions published in 1951 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Advances in biological and medical physics by Cornelius A Tobias( Book )

6 editions published between 1951 and 2013 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Advances in Biological and Medical Physics, Volume II highlights the application of nuclear physics to biological and medical problems. This volume is composed of nine chapters, and start with survey on the biological effects of radiation exposure. The succeeding chapters deal with the mechanisms of molecular exchange and blood transfusion; the use of carbon isotopes in in vivo and in vitro animal studies; and the principles and applications of radioautographic technique. These topics are followed by discussions on the carcinogenic potential of ionizing radiation and the detection or measure
The metabolism of carrier-free Be⁷ in the rat by Josephine F Crowley( Book )

2 editions published in 1949 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The destructive action of astatine²¹¹ (element 85) on the thyroid gland of the rat by Joseph G Hamilton( Book )

2 editions published in 1949 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The comparative metabolism and distribution of carrier-free radioarsenic (As⁷⁴) by Henry Charles Lanz( Book )

2 editions published in 1948 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The deposition of radioactive metals in bone as a potential health hazard by D. Harold Copp( Book )

2 editions published in 1946 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effects of CaEDTA upon the metabolic pattern of plutonium in rats by Joseph G Hamilton( Book )

2 editions published in 1952 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Metabolism of fission products : progress report for period ending February 15, 1943( Book )

2 editions published in 1947 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The use of chelating agents for accelerating excretion of radioelements by Harry Foreman( Book )

4 editions published in 1951 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although the deleterious effects of exposure to ionizing radiation were first recognized and described over fifty years ago, the adequate treatment of these effects still remains a therapeutic challenge. At the present time, when increasing numbers of our population are being exposed to radiation because of the great increase in availability and use of radioactive isotopes and because of the potential exposure of much greater numbers of people to radiation following a possible atomic bomb burst or from disseminated radioactivity, the need for development of adequate therapy is becoming an increasingly pressing medical problem. In a consideration of possible approaches to therapy, one must distinguish between radiation front sources external to the body and radiation which results from radioactive materials which by some means or other have gained access into the body. Internally deposited radiation emitters can be particularly insidious since so many of them become fixed in the skeleton and are eliminated at very slow rates. While it is possible to remove external sources of damaging radiation once the hazard is recognized, the internal radiation emitters often are not readily displaced and the body remains exposed to prolonged continued radiation. Where long-lived elements, such as plutonium with a biological half-life of the order of 100 years or radium with one of 45 years, are involved, the body can be subject to continuous radiation for the remainder of its lifetime. Moreover, because the radiation persists for such long periods of time, only minute amounts of certain radioelements, i.e., plutonium and radium, need have entered initially to produce considerable injury. The effects of this type of chronic exposure to radiation are well documented in the case reports on radium poisoning in workers in the luminous dial industry. The damage is manifest in various forms, i.e., severe anemia, osteitis, and osteogenic sarcoma. In the past, therapy to check injury from internal radiation emitters had been directed to attempts to hasten the elimination of the noxious agent. These have included such methods as low calcium diets, parathormone, viosterol, ammonium chloride, calcium gluconate, and low phosphorus diets. Of these the decalcifying type of treatment was reported to have some measure of effectiveness. The results of the other types of therapy were equivocal. The most successful approach was reported in the work of Schubert. Using zirconium citrate complex, administered 3 hours after the injection of radioyttrium and plutonium into rats, he was able to increase the urinary excretion of the injected radio elements many times over that of the excretion in the untreated rats, in some instance up by a factor of 50 for the first day of excretion. However, when used at later time periods, i.e., in a dog at 150 days, the increase in urinary excretion was only a factor of 2 to 3 over the control period. The fecal excretion of the radio elements was not influenced by the treatment. The present study reports a different approach for accelerating the excretion of radioelements, namely the use of chelating agents. Many of the rare earth and actinide series of elements form water-soluble chelates with various organic compounds. This consideration suggested the possibility that this property of chelating agents might be used 'in vivo' to mobilize radio elements fixed within the body. Of the many compounds considered, ethylenediamine tetracetic acid (EDTA) was chosen for this study. The EDTA was selected because it forms a very stable chelate with many metal ions and hence has a strong tendency to remove such ions from insoluble combinations, i.e., it will dissolve such salts as calcium oxalate, barium sulfate, and lead phosphate in neutral and alkaline solutions. Moreover, it has suitable characteristics for 'in vivo' application. It forms serum soluble chelates which are not readily broken down in the body but are rapidly excreted intact via the kidney. It is readily absorbed through the digestive tract. It has a very low level of toxicity when used as described in this study, namely as the calcium complex. A dose equivalent to 3 grams per kilo of body weight, injected intraperitoneally into rats, will result in death in approximately 50% of the injected animals in one day. When administered as a neutral salt, the EDTA combines avidly with serum calcium and produces death in hypocalcemia with relatively small doses, i.e., approximately 200 milligrams per kilo of body weight in rats. However, when administered combined with an equivalent weight of calcium ion, this negative calcium balance is prevented and the compound is rendered relatively non-toxic. Under these conditions the EDTA will still chelate a large number of metals, namely the metals which displace the calcium from combination with the EDTA because they form more stable chelates
Carrier-free radioisotopes from cyclotron targets by Warren Manford Garrison( Book )

2 editions published in 1949 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Metabolism of fission products : progress report for month ending March 15, 1943 by Joseph G Hamilton( Book )

2 editions published in 1947 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The metabolism of fission products and the heaviest elements in rats and plants by Joseph G Hamilton( Book )

2 editions published in 1947 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Metabolism of fission products by Joseph G Hamilton( Book )

3 editions published between 1944 and 1947 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Zr93 was prepared from neutron bombarded UO2(NO3)2.6H20. The Zr93 was removed from most of the fission products by the iodate method. Further purification was made using HF, and the Zr93 was finally purified by repeated K2CO3 fusions. Intramuscular studies with carrier-free Y88 revealed results similar in character to the earlier intraperitoneal experiments except for much less retention of the administered activity by the intraperitoneal organs. Intrapulmonary experiments revealed a moderate degree of lung retention of activity which ranged from 83% at one day to 6.4% at 64 days after administration. Most of the absorbed Y88 was deposited in the skeleton. Intramuscular experiments with carrier-free Ce>140 (Ce3) were undertaken to supplement earlier Ce>140 intraperitoneal and incomplete intramuscular studies. These studies indicated that while carrier free radiocerium is deposited chiefly in the skeleton, a relatively high uptake occurs in the liver and the rate of elimination apparently is significantly greater than for carrier-free radioyttrium. The lung retention of Ce>140 following intrapulmonary administration is somewhat greater than with Y88 and ranges from 67% at 1 day to 9.4% at 64 days after administration. The metabolic behavior of the carrier-free radioactive isotopes of lanthanum, cerium, and praseodymium are quite similar and differ significantly from carrier-free radioyttrium
Metabolism of fission products : progress report for period ending April 15, 1944 by Joseph G Hamilton( Book )

2 editions published in 1947 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Localization of cerium-144 in the skeletal tissues of fetal rats( Book )

2 editions published in 1957 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The developing fetal skeleton of the rat was used to study the microscopic localization of the rare earth Ce/sup 144/ in bone. Nineteen-day-old rat fetuses were injected with Ce/sup 144/ in isotonic sodium citrate via the umbilical vein. They were sacrificed one-haif hour after the injection by immersion in 80% alcohol fixative. The fetuses were embedded in paraffin and sectioned at 10 to 12 mu . Semiserial sections were treated with periodic acid- Schiff stain for mucopolysaccharides, and by the von Kossa technique for calcium. Contract x-ray-film autoradiographs and NTB stripping-film autoradiographs were prepared. Photographs of representative sections and their respective autoradiographs are presented for various bones. This material strongly suggests that the initial binding site of Ce/sup 44/ in the skeleton is in the organic matrix of cartilage and bone, especially where this matrix is just entering the calcifiable state. This conclusion is highly dependent upon the specificity of the von Kossa stain for calcium. (auth)
Advances in biological and medical physics by John Hundale Lawrence( Book )

3 editions published in 1948 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Advances in Biological and Medical Physics, Volume 1, provides an overview of the state of knowledge in biological and medical physics. The book contains 10 chapters and opens with a discussion of methods by which isotopes can be employed in medical and biological problems, and the factors that influence the choice of isotopes that have been and may be used in biological work. This is followed by separate chapters on the applications of nitrogen and carbon isotopes to in vivo studies of the animal organism; the nature and production of artificial radioactivity; the interaction of radioactivity
 
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Alternative Names
Hamilton, Jos. G. 1907-

Hamilton, Jos. G. (Joseph Gilbert), 1907-

Joseph Gilbert Hamilton Amerikaans natuurkundige (1907-1957)

Joseph Gilbert Hamilton amerikansk fysikar

Joseph Gilbert Hamilton amerikansk fysiker

Joseph Gilbert Hamilton US-amerikanischer Physiker und Nuklearmediziner

ג'וזף גילברט המילטון

جوزف گیلبرت همیلتون فیزیک‌دان آمریکایی

Languages
English (102)