WorldCat Identities

Henry, Ryan

Overview
Works: 11 works in 22 publications in 1 language and 428 library holdings
Roles: Editor
Classifications: JZ5588, 327
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Ryan Henry Publications about Ryan Henry
Publications by  Ryan Henry Publications by Ryan Henry
Most widely held works by Ryan Henry
The information revolution and international security ( Book )
6 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 244 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Promoting international energy security ( Book )
in English and held by 123 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Promoting international energy security : sea-lanes to Asia by Ryan Henry ( )
2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Promoting international energy security. sea-lanes to Asia ( Book )
2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Despite their growing importance in transporting vital energy resources, Asia's sea-lanes are already under stress and vulnerable, not only to geopolitical concerns but also the threat of piracy. Although the U.S. Navy has traditionally guaranteed freedom of the seas in Asia, a growing mission set and shrinking force structure challenge this role. RAND explored two alternative approaches to sea-lane security: joint and multinational. A joint approach would involve not only the U.S. Navy but also the U.S. Air Force and other relevant elements of the U.S. government (such as the Coast Guard and Department of State). A multinational approach could enhance partner capacity and promote burden sharing; improve the effectiveness and efficiency of unilateral and bilateral efforts; and better accommodate the emergence of new powers in the region, improving regional stability through confidence building. While the direct benefits of greater Air Force engagement in improving energy sea-lane security would likely be marginal, the spillover benefits of joint operations with the Navy and multinational engagement could make greater Air Force involvement worthwhile
Promoting international energy security volume 3, sea-lanes to Asia by Ryan Henry ( )
3 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Despite their growing importance in transporting vital energy resources, Asia's sea-lanes are already under stress and vulnerable, not only to geopolitical concerns but also the threat of piracy. Although the U.S. Navy has traditionally guaranteed freedom of the seas in Asia, a growing mission set and shrinking force structure challenge this role. RAND explored two alternative approaches to sea-lane security: joint and multinational. A joint approach would involve not only the U.S. Navy but also the U.S. Air Force and other relevant elements of the U.S. government (such as the Coast Guard and Department of State). A multinational approach could enhance partner capacity and promote burden sharing; improve the effectiveness and efficiency of unilateral and bilateral efforts; and better accommodate the emergence of new powers in the region, improving regional stability through confidence building. While the direct benefits of greater Air Force engagement in improving energy sea-lane security would likely be marginal, the spillover benefits of joint operations with the Navy and multinational engagement could make greater Air Force involvement worthwhile
Nymbler privacy-enhanced protection from abuses of anonymity by Ryan Henry ( Book )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Anonymous communications networks help to solve the real and important problem of enabling users to communicate privately over the Internet. However, by doing so, they also introduce an entirely new problem: How can service providers on the Internet--such as websites, IRC networks and mail servers--allow anonymous access while protecting themselves against abuse by misbehaving anonymous users? Recent research efforts have focused on using anonymous blacklisting systems (also known as anonymous revocation systems) to solve this problem. As opposed to revocable anonymity systems, which enable some trusted third party to deanonymize users, anonymous blacklisting systems provide a way for users to authenticate anonymously with a service provider, while enabling the service provider to revoke access from individual misbehaving anonymous users without revealing their identities. The literature contains several anonymous blacklisting systems, many of which are impractical for real-world deployment. In 2006, however, Tsang et al. proposed Nymble, which solves the anonymous blacklisting problem very efficiently using trusted third parties. Nymble has inspired a number of subsequent anonymous blacklisting systems. Some of these use fundamentally different approaches to accomplish what Nymble does without using third parties at all; so far, these proposals have all suffered from serious performance and scalability problems. Other systems build on the Nymble framework to reduce Nymble's trust assumptions while maintaining its highly efficient design. The primary contribution of this thesis is a new anonymous blacklisting system built on the Nymble framework--a nimbler version of Nymble--called Nymbler. We propose several enhancements to the Nymble framework that facilitate the construction of a scheme that minimizes trust in third parties. We then propose a new set of security and privacy properties that anonymous blacklisting systems should possess to protect: 1) users' privacy against malicious service providers and third parties (including other malicious users), and 2) service providers against abuse by malicious users
The military we need : the defense requirements of the Bush doctrine by Thomas Donnelly ( )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Transforming the U. S. Global Defense Posture by Ryan Henry ( )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Thrasher magazine presents : how to build skateboard ramps ( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Defense Transformation and the 2005 Quadrennial Defense Review ( )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
At the end of the Cold War, America entered a new and unfamiliar global security environment. As the Department of Defense began to alter strategies and plans, it quickly became apparent that changes might have to be made across the defense establishment. This led in 1993 to the Bottom-Up Review, and, starting in 1997, to the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) process. As the Department of Defense enters its third QDR this year, it is important to understand how central the QDR has become to the work of the department and how different this QDR is, compared to its predecessors. With a yearly budget in excess of $400 billion, the Department of Defense is perhaps the largest single bureaucracy in the world. Sheer size, as well as vested interests and old ways of thinking, tend to give large bureaucracies an inertial resistance to change. One of the tasks in the department this year is to ensure that the QDR can instead be an engine of continued transformation. The need to transform the U.S. military has elevated the role of the QDR from a tool of periodic refinement to a fulcrum of transition to a post-9/11 world. This article will explore what the QDR has become, how it is being processed, and what the Defense Department hopes it will achieve
Scrapbook by Viterbo University ( )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
 
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English (22)
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