WorldCat Identities

Bernal, Julio

Overview
Works: 7 works in 17 publications in 2 languages and 38 library holdings
Genres: Biography 
Roles: Translator, Thesis advisor
Classifications: ML420.O284, B
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Julio Bernal Publications about Julio Bernal
Publications by  Julio Bernal Publications by Julio Bernal
Most widely held works by Julio Bernal
Se me reventó el barzón : Amparo Ochoa by Julio Bernal ( Book )
4 editions published between 1996 and 1998 in Spanish and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
La noche quedó atras by Jan Valtin ( Book )
7 editions published between 1941 and 2008 in Spanish and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Compendio de la historia de Zaragoza; sus hechos heroicos, glorias y tradiciones desde su fundación hasta nuestros días by Pablo Claramunt y Romeo ( Book )
2 editions published in 1904 in Spanish and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Calvario de las Religiones en 1808-1809 by Julio Bernal ( Book )
1 edition published in 1958 in Spanish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
El Poder sovietico : la sexta parte socialista del mundo by Hewlett Johnson ( Book )
1 edition published in 1941 in Spanish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Effects of Life History, Domestication, and Breeding of Zea on the Specialist Herbivore Dalbulus maidis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) by Edwin Bellota Villafuerte ( )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
A suite of plants from the maize genus Zea L. (Poaceae) and the specialist herbivore Dalbulus maidis (DeLong and Wolcott, 1923) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) were used to test the hypotheses that anti-herbivore defenses are affected by plant life-history evolution and human intervention through domestication and breeding for high yield. The suite of plants included a commercial hybrid maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.), a landrace maize, two populations of annual Balsas teosinte (Z. mays ssp. parviglumis Iltis & Doebley), and perennial teosinte (Z. diploperennis Iltis, Doebley & Guzman). Leaf toughness and pubescence, oviposition preference, and feeding and oviposition acceptance parameters were compared among the suite of host plants looking for effects of transitions in life history (perennial to annual teosinte), domestication (annual teosinte to landrace maize), and breeding (landrace maize to hybrid maize) on defenses against D. maidis. Observations on leaf toughness suggested that the life history and domestication transitions weakened the plant̕ s resistance to penetration by the herbivore̕ s mouthparts and ovipositor, as expected, while observations on pubescence suggested that the breeding transition led to stronger defense in hybrid maize compared to landrace maize, contrary to expectation. Observations on oviposition preference of D. maidis coincided with the expectations that life history and domestication transitions would lead to preference for Balsas teosinte over perennial teosinte, and of landrace maize over Balsas teosinte. A negative correlation suggested that oviposition preference is significantly influenced by leaf toughness. Observations on host plant feeding and iii oviposition acceptance under no-choice conditions suggested that D. maidis equally accepts all host plants considered in this study, thus these observations did not support the hypotheses associated with the life history, domestication, and breeding transitions evident in the herbivore̕ s host genus. Overall, the results of this study suggested that plant defenses against specialist herbivores are variably affected by plant life history evolution, domestication, and breeding. Additionally, the study̕ s results suggested that chemical defenses may play a role in Zea antiherbivore defense because the two physical defenses that were evaluated (i.e. leaf toughness and pubescence) only partially explained host preference of D. maidis. The electronic version of this dissertation is accessible from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/149221
Host Plant Influences on Performance and Haplotype Diversity of Dalbulus maidis, a Specialist Herbivore of Zea by Amanda Marina Davila-Flores ( )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In one study, a suite of plants from the maize genus Zea L. (Poaceae) and the specialist herbivore Dalbulus maidis (DeLong and Wolcott, 1923) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) were used to test the hypotheses that anti-herbivore defenses are affected by plant life-history evolution and human intervention through domestication and breeding for high yield. The suite of Zea host plants included one Mexican commercial hybrid maize Zea mays ssp. mays L., a landrace variety of maize, two populations of Balsas teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis Iltis & Doebley), and perennial teosinte (Z. diploperennis Iltis, Doebley & Guzman). This suite of host plants includes three Transitions evident within the genus Zea: life history form perennial to annual life cycle evident between perennial teosinte and Balsas teosinte, domestication transition from wild annual to domesticated annual evident between Balsas teosinte and landrace maize, and; breeding transition from landrace cultivar to a hybrid cultivar. The transitions were correlated with differences in plant defenses, as indicated by corn leafhopper performance. Results showed a performance gradient, suggesting a pattern in which plant defense is stronger in perennial than annual plants, Balsas teosinte than landrace maize, and in landraces than in hybrid maize. Furthermore, results suggested that domesticated maize would be the least defended, most suitable host for corn leafhopper. In a second study, haplotype diversity was assessed to address structuring and interconnectedness among samples of corn leafhopper collected in the southwestern region of Mexico to address whether different hosts represent different templates for microevolution. The geographic focus of the study was maintained within an area encompassing the presumed centers of radiation of Dalbulus and its host genus Zea, and of maize domestication. Samples were complemented with samples of corn leafhopper sequences available at GenBank. Results revealed seven haplotypes from three host plants within Zea: perennial teosinte, Balsas teosinte, and maize. Furthermore, genetic differentiation was present and haplotype diversity appears to correlate with differences in genetic structure between perennial teosinte and maize. One haplotype was found to be present throughout all sites, which appears to parallel the spread of maize cultivation. As maize cultivation spread beyond its area of domestication, corn leafhoppers colonized perennial teosinte, further suggesting that subsequent decreases in maize cultivation in perennial teosinte habitat created a refuge where perennial teosinte- adapted haplotypes could persist. Altogether, my research suggests that the combination of historical expansion of maize cultivation expansion and the weaker anti-herbivore defenses associated within maize domestication appears to have favored genotypes particularly adapted for exploiting maize. The electronic version of this dissertation is accessible from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/148396
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.55 (from 0.00 for Calvario d ... to 1.00 for Compendio ...)
Languages
Spanish (15)
English (2)