WorldCat Identities

White, Peter 1947 June 18-

Overview
Works: 20 works in 34 publications in 3 languages and 1,073 library holdings
Genres: Juvenile works  History  Documentary radio programs 
Roles: Author, Narrator
Classifications: HV1568, 362.4
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Peter White
 
Most widely held works by Peter White
Being blind by Peter White( Book )

9 editions published between 1998 and 2004 in English and Dutch and held by 546 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Describes what it is like to be blind, some of the challenges faced by blind people, and the ways they cope with everyday life
Disabled people by Peter White( Book )

5 editions published between 1988 and 1989 in English and Undetermined and held by 300 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Discusses the problems of people with physical and mental handicaps, such as finding jobs and mates, while emphasizing their similarities to the "rest of the world", and offers suggestions for personally helping the disabled
Blind man's bete noire( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In Blind Man's Bete Noire, Peter White explores some of the things which annoy him most about his blindness. The four programmes include The Countryside, Holidays, Being Introduced to Other Blind People and Going Slowly
Tænk hvis du var blind by Peter White( Book )

2 editions published between 2000 and 2006 in Danish and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Woman's sadness, family sadness : an insight into postnatal depression by Elaine MacDonald( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The political, ethnic and religious makeup of NSW's migrant communities by Peter White( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Disability : a new history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radio documentary presented by Peter White entitled 'Sex and marriage'. The episode discusses how the Victorian era saw sex between disabled people as taboo. A document from Buckingham Palace is used to illustrate how disabled women from the Girls Friendly Society, sewed nightgowns for wedding trousseau. This charity, founded in 1875, made a particular attempt to employ women with disabilities in its needlework depot. Vivienne Richmond of Goldsmiths, University of London, speaks about the contrast between the garments the women made and their own lack of sexuality. Annual reports for 19th century charity schools take pains to show donors no sex was allowed. Mike Mantin, of Swansea University has researched the Cambrian Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, in Swansea, and its strictures on sex, influenced by the idea that deaf people shouldn't intermarry because it would spread deafness. However, he thinks there was a difference between the public face of an institution and the fact that marriage was happening. Joanna Bourke, Professor of History, Birkbeck College, London, describes the panic in late Victorian England over sex and disability. She mentions that these were the early days of genetics and genetic understanding, leading to the idea of negative eugenics. In this, if someone in a family had a disability then they should not be able to reproduce. This in turn could taint the person's family and was expressed in the phrase 'bad blood', referring to morals as well, despite there being little scientific basis. Nevertheless, eugenics and fear of disability was prevalent in Europe and America
Disability : a new history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radio documentary presented by Peter White entitled 'Wooden legs and wheelchairs'. Historian, Julie Anderson, and Peter White talk about the wooden leg made for the Marquis of Anglesey to replace his leg that was shot off at the Battle of Waterloo. He had many made and popularised wooden legs amongst the wealthy in Britain. Poor people, and children, usually had a peg leg or wooden stump which they may have made themselves. Wounded men were a common site on the streets due to the Napoleonic Wars but, equally, surviving the war with a missing limb was seen as a tangible display of having fought. Caroline Neilson, of Newcastle University, is amazed by the diary of the soldier, Thomas Jackson, who lost his leg in the Napoleonic Wars, because he gives such a vivid description of what it was like. In 1815, he became a Chelsea pensioner, was given a wooden leg, and went on to do a variety of jobs and live an independent life. Professor Amanda Vickery, Queen Mary, University of London, is interested in an account of a disabled woman in 18th century Bath, Mary Hartley. She suggests it is almost impossible to find evidence of what life was like for women with disabilities as their social status often means little information was left behind. Mary Hartley appears in a number of letters from a nurse who describes her suffering. Amanda Vickery is interested in why Mary went to Bath as, despite having money, as it doesn't appear she went for treatments or for anything that improved her mobility, such as a wheelchair
Disability : a new history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radio documentary presented by Peter White entitled 'Doing and being' about work. Chris Mounsey, University of Winchester, recently blind himself, talks of an 18th century blind poet, Priscilla Pointon who wrote about everyday events in her life. She made her money through a subscription list where people paid in advance for her work. However, it is more difficult to find out about working disabled people at the other end of the social scale. In the mid-19th century, Henry Mayhew, in his 'London Labour and the London Poor' (1861), records the story of lame Irish crossing sweeper, who was helped out financially by his friends. There was no sense of special treatment for disabled people in the workforce. Historian, Julie Anderson, University of Kent, says there was a large range of work undertaken by disabled people in the Victorian period. Women with disabilities, in particular, were not considered very marriageable so often had to work. One source of information on the times are the letters written to the Poor Law guardians asking for money, including one from Charles Symcock in Manchester who had lost the use of his right leg. Professor Steven King, Leicester University, says that letters like this show that everyone in the 18th and 19th centuries identified themselves through work. There was seen as no point in paying someone physically fit to do a job that someone with a disability could do, which also reduced their need to claim welfare benefits
Disability : a new history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radio documentary entitled 'The only dwarf in Liverpool' in which Peter White, who is blind himself, explores what it was like to live with disability in the 18th and 19th centuries by looking at a variety of contemporary sources. One of the contributors, the historian Chris Mounsey, is interested in first hand accounts of those living with physical disablities. This includes a letter by Peg Barnes, written in 1836, who calls himself 'the only dwarf in Liverpool'. He asks the Poor Law Guardians for financial help because he is going blind. This is one of many letters collected by Professor Steven King, of Leicester University, which are noteworthy because they are written in the original voice of the person with the disability and include facts about their ordinary lives. Another letter, written in 1903, from William Jones, a dwarf in Leeds, suggests there is less opportunity for an unemployed dwarf in Leeds than in London. David Turner, from Swansea University, is the author of a new study of disability in the 18th century. He considers how the perception of disability started to shift away from it being seen as a sin or punishment, helped by a growing medical interest. Also, many modern day views on disability were shaped at this time in newspapers, sermons and humour. Professor Judith Hawley, of Royal Holloway, University of London, discusses words used to describe disablity at the time, both by the public in general and people with disabilities themselves
Disability : a new history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radio documentary presented by Peter White entitled 'Brave poor things'. Discusses how the history of disabled children in the 19th is often seen through propoganda and rarely the authentic voice of the child. Joanna Bourke, Professor of History, Birkbeck College, London, looks at 19th century evangelical Christian propoganda leaflets which often use a child's voice. The disabled child was a powerful religous symbol for Victorians and this continued in fiction of the time. Julie Anderson, from the University of Kent, discusses the types of disability that were common in children. Infant mortality was high, as was infanticide due to disability, which meant there may have been fewer children with obvious congenital disabilities. Since, blind and deaf children were more difficult to spot at birth, their disabilities became a particular concern in the Victorian period and they were considered to be morally at risk from not being able to hear or read the word of God. Charities saw it as their task to save them. One such was the Guild of the Brave Poor Things. Mike Mantin, has explored the history of this charity. Julie Anderson discusses the way these charities have left a legacy in the way disabled people are seen as needy, dependent and grateful for help. Even with the bias, charity records are the best source of information on how disabled children were treated. Two letters are read from children, sent from the Cambrian Institution for the Deaf and Dumb in Swansea. One was actually dictated for the child by an adult, the other, more genuine one, was found unsent amongst the principal's personal papers
Disability : a new history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radio documentary presented by Peter White entitled 'A disabled identity'. Peter White looks at how disabled people have needed to have a collective identity to make change. He suggests that many think this collective consciousness began after the First World War, but that it was actually much earlier. Selina Mills, who is writing a history of blindness and also losing her sight, discusses the strong character of the blind French woman, Adel̀e Husson, and her views on blindness and the education of blind children. Another, blind woman, Hippolyte van Lendegem, is also discussed. Her 1864 work, Charity Mis-Applied, in particular spoke up against educational segregation. Her life is now being uncovered by David Turner, of Swansea University, who looks at her concern that charitable institutions appeared to dampen ambition and intelligence. Julie Anderson, University of Kent, discusses 19th century workshops for blind men, which often provided poor levels of pay and were badly managed. In 1897, these workers banded together into a small but militant group. In 1899, they registered as a trade union, and in 1902 became affiliated with the Trades Union Congress and the Labour Party. This is seen as possibly the beginning of collective disabled political action. Peter White and Selina Mills discuss role models with disablities and disabled identity. Finally, Peter White talks about some of the surprising things he has found in making this series, especially in hearing the voices of those with disabilities
Disability : a new history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radio documentary presented by Peter White entitled 'Freaks and entrepreneurs'. During the 17th-19th centuries, many people with disabilities, who worked as entertainers, produced handbills to advertise themselves. Historians are now reassessing freaks and freak shows in a way that casts a new light on the history of disabled people. Naomi Baker, of Manchester University, has written about the lost sense of humour about physical differences in the 17th century although it is unclear how much disabled people themselves shared this humour. The handbills suggest that the 18th century freak scene was fairly large and competitive. Professor Judith Hawley talks about public and private performances of freak shows. Tim Hitchcock, from the University of Hertfordshire, suggests that beggars with disabilites did better if they had an 'act' to grab attention. He cites, Charles Wood who was blind, but made a good living in the 1820s with a dancing dog. Some people with disabilities were very successful. One such was Matthew Buchinger (29 inches high and born without hands, feet or thighs) who, in the 1720s, was a successful artist, musician and stuntman. David Turner, of Swansea University, has studied him, and historian, Julie Anderson, included Buchinger in a touring exhibition of disabled artists and their self-portraits
Disability : a new history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radio documentary presented by Peter White entitled 'Finding a voice'. This episode concerns a little known (although successful at the time) 18th century book entitled, 'Essay on deformity' written by the politician William Hay in 1754. Hay was born with a spinal curvature, and delivers a funny, direct, first person narrative. David Turner, of Swansea University, sees it as a landmark publication describing, the experience of living with a physical disability in the 18th century along with personal views on his situation. Naomi Baker, of Manchester University, finds Hay interesting because his essays are full of contradiction. Hay has strong views on diet and exercise and through his own health and well-being counters the arguement of the time that deformity was caused by ill-health and disease. Chris Mounsey, University of Winchester, is interested in the way Hay talks of using and improving the parts of you that work best, including the mind. Hay had a successful career as MP for Seaford in East Sussex, and also published two editions of a political pamphlet about the problem of poverty. Tim Hitchcock, University of Hull, looks at the influence Hay's disability may have had on his life as a politician but found very little relationship between the two, and although he worked on the poor law he was not particularly empathetic towards the poor. Naomi Baker says that he saw himself as a rational character who lived by his mind, defining himself as being educated and civilised. William Hay, is an unusual role model, but Chris Mounsey feels that his work still remains an inspiration for disabled people now
Disability : a new history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radio documentary presented by Peter White entitled 'Beauty and deformity'. This episode looks at 18th century ideas of beauty and physical disability and its impact on those with disabilities. An excerpt is read from the writing of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu who had bad smallpox scarring. Later in the programme it is noted that due to her aristocratic status she was able to overcome her disfigurement socially. Professor Judith Hawley mentions how physical deformity and ugliness were seen as a moral deformity. Naomi Baker, of Manchester University, suggests that the rise of scientific interest in the 18th century promoted an increase in ideas of order and regularity, including a beautiful and healthy body. Anything that deviated from this could be open to ridicule and sometimes stronger views. Julie Anderson, from the University of Kent, talks of the fear of 'maternal impression', a widely held view based on the medical knowledge of the time, that if a pregnant woman saw a person with a disability, the foetus would be imprinted with this and then born with it. This was also used by some to explain their own disability, notably the 'elephant man', Joseph Merrick. Judith Hawley, continues that women were often seen as physiologically abnormal precisely because they were female rather than male. There was a great deal of money to be made in clothing and instruments that could lead to an improvement in body shape. Class, wealth and status could usually mitigate any loss of beauty
Disability : a new history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Radio documentary presented by Peter White entitled 'Miracle cures'. The episode begins with the early years of the writer Samuel Johnson who, Professor Judith Hawley, of Royal Holloway, University of London, mentions was a very sickly child and was taken to London for the miracle cure of being touched by Queen Anne. The idea that the monarch could cure you of disease prevailed from medieval times until about 1714. Medical historian, Irina Metzler has collected thousands of miracle stories, particularly those relating to the healing qualities of the relics of saints and visits to a saint's shrine. Miracle stories also provide details of the daily lives of peoples with disabilities. There was often considered to be a correlation between sin and disability so once sins were forgiven, the body could be healed. The Middle Ages were a fairly tolerant time for understanding of disabilities. Child disabilities were often blamed on the parents, including their sexual activity. Judith Hawley continues that, by the 18th century, disability was seen more as a physical malformation, than the moral fault of the parents. Early doctors' advertisements often echo the biblical language of miracle cures
 
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  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.44 (from 0.32 for Disabled p ... to 0.97 for Tænk hvis ...)

Being blind
Alternative Names
Peter White Brits journalist

Peter White journaliste britannique

پیتر وایت ژورنالیست بریتانیایی

Languages
English (30)

Danish (2)

Dutch (1)

Covers
See it my way