WorldCat Identities

Benzer, Seymour

Overview
Works: 43 works in 62 publications in 5 languages and 3,458 library holdings
Genres: Interviews  History  Academic theses  Biography 
Roles: Author, Thesis advisor, Honoree
Classifications: QL537.D76, 574.082
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Seymour Benzer
Conversations in genetics. an oral history of our intellectual heritage in genetics( Visual )

in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A collection of conversations with geneticists who have made major contributions to the conceptual foundations of modern genetics. Accomplished researchers reflect on their research achievements and describe the paths they took during various phases of their lives. Useful to those interested in the history of genetics and the evolution of scientific ideas
Neurogenetics of drosophila by Alberto Ferrús( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The fine structure of the gene by Seymour Benzer( Book )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The history of neuroscience in autobiography( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

One of a series of archival interviews from the Society for Neuroscience featuring pinoeering neuroscientists. This segment focuses on Seymour Benzer and Horace Barlow
The Harvey lectures; delivered under the auspices of the Harvey society of New York, 1960-1961 by Seymour Benzer( Book )

1 edition published in 1961 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Conversations in Genetics an oral history of our intellectual heritage in genetics. Vol. 2.( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A collection of conversations with geneticists who have made major contributions to the conceptual foundations of modern genetics. Accomplished researchers reflect on their research achievements and describe the paths they took during various phases of their lives. Useful to those interested in the history of genetics and the evolution of scientific ideas
Seymour Benzer Horace Barlow by H. B Barlow( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

One of a series of archival interviews from the Society for Neuroscience featuring pioneering neuroscientists. This segment focuses on Seymour Benzer and Horace Barlow
Role of Apolipoprotein D and its homologs, in normal and pathological aging, in Drosophila melanogaster by Julien A Muffat( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The free radical theory of aging is probably the most enduring one to date. It stipulates that, in the process of normal cellular function, in particular due to oxygen-based respiration, reactive oxygen species are formed. These constantly put a strain on the cell, damaging lipids in the membranes, causing protein aggregation and loss-of-function, or mutations in the genome. Over time, this accumulated damage overcomes the repair potential of a given cell, and scaled up to an entire organism, results in the deterioration seen in normal aging. Under these assumptions, age-related pathologies are only an acceleration of the process in a given tissue, leading to the emergence of the pathology over the noise of normal aging. In the past decade, invertebrates such as Drosophila melanogaster and C. elegans have provided invaluable insight into these processes and the canonical pathways that regulate them. This success is owed in part to the power of the genetic tools available, to their relatively short lifespans, and to the wide arrays of phenotypes that can be studied. We set out to study a particular protein, Glaz, whose overexpression enables fruitflies to live 30% longer than normal. This protein was identified as a hit from a screen looking at an accelerated aging paradigm, placing fruitflies in 100% oxygen. While an interesting protein in its own right, it was through its homology with mammalian Apolipoprotein D (ApoD), that our interest was truly piqued. ApoD and its homologs turn out to be fascinating proteins, upregulated by various stresses and in age-related diseases such as cancers and Alzheimer's. We showed, in our model organism of choice, that this upregulation is part of a beneficial stress response. Understanding and harnessing its functions can only help provide therapeutic approaches for a wide range of disorders."
Neurogenetics of Drosophila : dedicated to Seymour Benzer on the occasion of his 70th birthday by Alberto Ferrús( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Drosophila feeding behavior and demographic mechanisms of lifespan extension by Gil B. de Carvalho( )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Why do we age? Most organisms undergo senescence, a process involving progressive functional decline culminating in death, yet this widespread phenomenon remains largely mysterious. A number of genetic and environmental factors affect longevity, the best conserved and most widely studied of which is dietary restriction (DR), a reduction of nutrient intake short of malnutrition. Since nutrient ingestion determines lifespan, any factor affecting longevity - particular food components, genetic pathways or drugs - may do so indirectly, by altering feeding behavior. This is particularly true in Drosophila, which is normally kept in conditions where food is present in excess. Moreover, since DR is applied by aging flies on two different food concentrations - diluted media are associated with an extended lifespan - animals may alter their intake in response to the change in nutrient content. Since the medium is also the only water source, this compensatory feeding would result in changes in hydration, introducing a second experimental variable. Despite these issues, Drosophila feeding behavior has classically been ignored or superficially characterized in the context of aging research, partly due to the absence of appropriate methodology. We developed two complementary assays allowing long-term measurement of food intake. Using these techniques, we present the first characterization of real-time Drosophila feeding behavior. Our results reveal gender-specific feeding trends and show that mating stimulates female appetite via the seminal Sex Peptide. Additionally, we show that ingestion is dramatically affected by food dilution or dietary additives. Animals fed concentrated media restrict their intake and are chronically thirsty. We have found that lifespan extension by classical DR paradigms is abolished in the presence of ad libitum water, challenging the long-held assumption that DR affects longevity by altering nutrient intake. We characterize a new regime that robustly prolongs lifespan irrespective of water availability, and thus likely represents a more relevant model for mammalian DR. In contrast to previous claims, demographic analysis using this paradigm indicates that DR acts not by reducing the immediate risk of death, but by slowing the accumulation of age-related damage. Our findings directly challenge current views on the mechanistic basis of DR and have broad implications for the study of aging and nutrition in model organisms."
Translational control mediates lifespan extension due to dietary restriction in Drosophila by Brian M Zid( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Identification and isolation of genes that code for formamidine receptors and formamidine sensitivity in Drosophila by Yadin Dudai( Book )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Three varieties of human hæmoglobin D by Seymour Benzer( Book )

1 edition published in 1958 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A Change From Nonsense to Sense in Genetic Code, By Seymour Benzer and Sewell P. Champe by Seymour Benzer( Book )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

On the Topology of the Genetic Fine Structure by Seymour Benzer( )

1 edition published in 1959 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

From the classical researches of Morgan and his school [1], the chromosome is known as a linear arrangement of hereditary elements, the "genes." These elements must have an internal structure of their own. At this finer level, within the "gene" the question arises again: what is the arrangement of the sub-elements? Specifically, are they linked together in a linear order analogous to the higher level of integration of the genes in the chromosome? Until recently, the sensitivity of genetic analysis has been insufficient to answer this question. Mapping of a genetic structure is done by observing the recombination of its parts, and recombination involving parts of the structure that are very close together is a rare event. Observation of such rare events requires very many offspring and a selective trick for detecting the few individuals in which the event is recorded. It is for this reason that microorganism are the material of choice for studies of genetic fine structure, and have made it feasible to extend the fineness of genetic mapping by orders of magnitude. In favorable systems, the attainable resolution reaches the level of the molecular subunits of the hereditary material. and experimental testing of the linear arrangement of the finest structural details is therefore possible. A number of cases have been investigated on this level [2]. As a rule, closely linked mutations affecting the same characteristic can be seriated in an unambiguous way, suggesting a linear model. However, the "distances" (i.e., recombination frequencies) between mutations are not always strictly additive, and certain complexities ("negative interference" effects [3,4]) make quantitative analysis difficult. As pointed out by Muller [5] in regard to similar difficulties encountered in mapping on the chromosomal level, strict additivity of "distances" should not be taken as the criterion for the linear character of an array. A crucial examination of the question should be made from the po
Reversal of Mutant Phenotypes by 5-Fluorouracil: An Approach to Nucleotide Sequences in Messenger-Rna, by Sewell P. Champe and Seymour Benzer by Sewell P Champe( Book )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ambivalent rII mutants of phage T4 by Seymour Benzer( )

1 edition published in 1961 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The rII mutants of phage T4 differ from the standard type in being inactive on strains of Escherichia coli lysogenic for phage X. While the mutants attach to the cells and inject their DNA, progeny fail to appear. In this paper it is shown that one or another subset of the rII mutants can become active as a result of modification of the host, either by mutation or by the action of 5-fluorouracil. The effects are characterized by extreme specificity, applying only to certain rII mutations at certain points within the two rII cistrons. The phenomenon resembles what has been called, in many other systems, "allele-specific suppression [1]," in which a mutation outside a genetic region controlling a particular function suppresses the effects of some of the mutations within the region. An advantage of the phage system is that a given genetic message, in the form of a phage mutant, can be readily inserted into different hosts. The stimulus for the present investigation derives from the possibility that modifications of the host affecting the expression of specific phage mutations might be a key to the detection of alterations in the components of the cellular system for translating genetic information
Structure of a genetic region in bacteriophage by Seymour Benzer( )

2 editions published in 1959 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

On the Species Specificity of Acceptor RNA and Attachment Enzymes by Seymour Benzer( )

1 edition published in 1961 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

One of the steps in protein biosynthesis appears to be the attachment of each amino acid to a specific acceptor (SRNA) molecule. According to the adaptor hypothesis, each SRNA molecule would then fit to a specific complementary base sequence on a linear RNA template, specifying the sequence of amino acids in the resultant protein [1,2]. An adaptor molecule thus could have two specificities: one recognizing the correct amino acid and activating enzyme; the other, the proper position on the template. The correctness of the amino-acid sequence therefore would depend upon the precision and constancy of the adaptors. However, the structures of the enzymes and adaptors are presumably under the genetic control of the organism and might be subject to heritable modifications. It is therefore conceivable that one or both ends of an adaptor might change sufficiently to cause occasional errors and, in the long run, an alteration of the genetic code might evolve. This notion, prompted by genetic observations [3] which suggested that mutation of a bacterium might modify its translation of genetic information, lead to the present comparison of the specificities of the acceptor RNA and activating enzymes of different organisms. Several differences in specificity have been reported previously. Berg et al. [4] demonstrated that SRNA from Escherichia coli contains two distinguishable acceptors for methionine. An enzyme prepared from yeast could attach methionine to one of these, while the enzyme from E. coli could attach to both. Webster found, in pig liver, a difference between the nuclear and cytoplasmic attachment enzymes for alanine. Rendi and Ochoa [6] noted that, for leucine, the enzymes in yeast and in E. coli could attach only to their homologous SRNA. Furthermore, in the case of leucine, rat liver enzyme and SRNA were interchangeable with those from E. coli. The observations presented below show that whether the enzymes and/or acceptors from two organisms are interchangeable
Identification and isolation of genes that code for formamidine receptors and formamidine sensitivity in Drosophila : Final report, Project no. I-884-85 by United States-Israel Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund( Book )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Seymour Benzer amerikansk fysikar

Seymour Benzer amerikansk fysiker

Seymour Benzer amerykański biolog molekularny

Seymour Benzer fisico e genetista statunitense

Seymour Benzer US-amerikanischer Physiker und Biologe

Бензер, Сеймур

سیمور بنزر فیزیک‌دان آمریکایی

シーモア・ベンザー

西摩·本泽

Languages
Covers
Reconceiving the gene : Seymour Benzer's adventures in phage geneticsThe history of neuroscience in autobiography