WorldCat Identities

Borden, Brett 1954-

Overview
Works: 24 works in 50 publications in 1 language and 1,323 library holdings
Classifications: TK6580, 621.3848
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Brett Borden Publications about Brett Borden
Publications by  Brett Borden Publications by Brett Borden
Most widely held works by Brett Borden
Radar imaging of airborne targets a primer for applied mathematicians and physicists by Brett Borden ( )
18 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,062 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"This book has been written as a primer for physicists and applied mathematicians who are interested in understanding the subject and its current mathematical research issues. The book presents the issues and techniques associated with radar imaging from a mathematical point of view rather than from an instrumentation perspective. This is accomplished by concentrating on the scattering issues, the inverse scattering problem, and the approximations that are usually made by practical algorithm developers. The author also explains the consequences of these approximations to the resultant radar image and its interpretation, and examines methods for reducing model-based error."--BOOK JACKET
Fundamentals of radar imaging by Margaret Cheney ( Book )
8 editions published in 2009 in English and Undetermined and held by 235 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Radar imaging is a mathematically rich subject with many interesting applications and a large variety of challenging, mathematical open problems. The goal of this book is to provide mathematicians with the background they need to work in the field, building on the foundation of the underlying partial differential equations. The focus is on showing the connection between the physics and the mathematics and on supplying an intuitive mathematical understanding of basic concepts. The book includes a description of how a radar system works
What is the radar tracking "glint" problem and can it be solved? by Brett Borden ( Book )
2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"We present an elementary tutorial on the glint problem in radar tracking. Our approach uses a very simple model yet, because of several original observations, it allows us to make some very general observations about glint. In addition, we briefly survey the collected standard mitigating approaches and comment on their relative merits and shortcomings."--Rept. doc. p
Enhanced down-range profiles of complex targets using wideband radar echo returns by Brett Borden ( Book )
2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Small radar detection and tracking systems-in particular, radar guided missile systems-are of great utility because of their all-weather performance and their long range capabilities. A major drawback with these systems results from the relatively simple data that they collect and the difficulty in using these data for target classification and identification purposes. We propose a technique which employs the statistics of the tracking data used by many missile seekers and which creates a cross-range target structure map that can be expressed as a function of the target's down-range extent. These data consist of ordinary azimuth elevation phase monopulse measurements collected from a small set of (unknown) aspects presented by the target as it maneuvers. The method requires a minimal computational burden and holds the potential to be used for automatic (machine-based) target classification in realistic (time and data limited) environments ... Glint, Identification, Radar, Target ID
High doppler resolution imaging by multistatic continuous wave radars using constructive techniques by Wei Ting Soh ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The multistatic radar offers many advantages over monostatic radar in certain applications, especially since the receiving stations may be located at covert and distant sites relative to the transmitting stations. Furthermore, continuous wave radars are relatively simple and inexpensive to employ and maintain. Hence, the impetus for developing a CW multistatic radar system for high-resolution imaging was conceived. This thesis is a proof of concept demonstration that a Doppler-only multistatic radar system can be employed to provide high resolution imaging of airborne targets in support of non-cooperative target recognition. Through an understanding of conventional imaging techniques and formulation of the inverse problem in radar imaging, a demonstration radar model based on one transmitter and two receivers was designed to determine the accurate position and velocity of simulated targets. The extraction errors resulted from the range, bearing and velocity measurements were congruent with the physical limitations of each transmitter-receiver pair. Through the employment of a multistatic system, the geometrical diversity allowed these limitations to be overcome
Doppler-only synthetic aperture radar by Cheng Lock Charles Chua ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
SAR has traditionally been performed using high-range resolution data. This thesis is a proof-of-concept that the imaging process can be performed using high-doppler resolution data. The system requires a simple continuous wave transmitter, and the signal returns are confined to a narrow band. High-doppler resolution data is collected along an isodoppler line for different perspectives of the target. This data, a sinogram, is equivalent to taking the Radon transform of the target. The Fourier transform of the sinogram from each perspective (at an angle eÌ ) gives a slice of the two-dimensional transform subtending an angle eÌ with the axis, with equally distributed points along the line. This results in a higher density of points near the centre. Some form of weighting is necessary. This weighting is part of the Filtered Backprojection algorithm to determine the Inverse Radon transform of the sinogram. The backprojection portion is a simple redistribution of data back along the original projection line. Images were modeled by delta functions to test the above algorithm. The main points noted were that the reconstructed image was a scaled version of the original image, and that the quality of the image improved when more perspectives of the target were taken
A Short Analysis of the Effects of System Thermal Noise on Angle-of-Arrival Enhanced Range Profiles ( )
1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This report documents an effort to modify the effects of thermal noise error on a novel automatic target recognition technique applicable to airborne radar targets. The method uses the information about the target's cross-range structure that is statistically encoded in the radar tracking data and is potentially applicable to many existing radar missile systems. (MM)
Advanced research into imaging of moving targets by Christopher S Carroll ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Radar imaging is an area of tremendous interest as radar-based systems are perhaps the only all-weather, long range remote sensing systems. However, radar's continued utility and application in wide-ranging areas is fundamentally dependent on the ability to produce high-quality, artifact-free imagery. To date, the use of radar to identify and image moving objects remains of great interest. It is well known that motion in the scene gives rise to mispositioning or streaking when target motion is not properly addressed. Many techniques have been developed to handle moving objects, but these techniques typically make use of the start-stop approximation, in which a target in motion is assumed to be momentarily stationary while it is being interrogated by a radar pulse. A new linearized imaging theory that combines the spatial, temporal and spectral aspects of scattered waves has been developed. This thesis studies the performance of this new imaging scheme. It also shows that the behavior of the imaging system is dependent on the aperture geometry and choice of radar waveforms transmitted
Radar Inverse Scattering Using Statistical Estimation of the Echo Phase- Front Derivatives ( )
1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Many of the existing methods for asymptotic inverse scattering rely heavily on simplifying assumptions such as convex target structure and full- aspect data sets
Handbook of Mathematical Methods in Imaging A Springer Live Reference by Andy Adler ( )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Experimental Proof-Of-Concept of Phase Derivative Based Range Profile Enhancement ATR ( )
1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This report documents an initial effort to experimentally verify a novel automatic target recognition technique applicable to airborne radar targets. The method uses the information about the target's cross-range structure, which is statistically encoded in the radar tracking data and is potentially applicable to many existing radar missile systems
Nonlinear transformation optics techniques in the design of counter-directed energy weapons shields for satellites by Matthew DeMartino ( )
in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The purpose of this thesis is to examine the feasibility of using an emerging technique, called transformation optics (TO), in designing materials to be used as a defense against directed energy weapons for satellites. In order to do this, a method of determining the effectiveness of TO against high-intensity fields must be demonstrated. These high-intensity fields will cause a nonlinear response in the material and it is this nonlinear response that will be studied. TO has been shown to be effective when dealing with lower intensity fields and thus linear responses in matter[2]. This thesis will attempt to model the nonlinear response and solve for the fields due to this response. The fields induced by the nonlinear response are considered an error field. To solve for the error field, a method to model the nonlinear response will be derived using Millers Rule. Stemming from the Lorentz-Drude model of polarization, Millers Rule serves as a model of the nonlinear response but has been shown experimentally to be approximately true[3]. Once the nonlinear response has been found, the error can be analyzed as an electrostatic problem to determine if the polarization or magnetization induces a field within the cloaked area
Analysis of point-spread function for imaging moving targets from scattered waves by Lu Pin Tan ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Radar imaging is an area of tremendous interest as radar-based systems are perhaps the only all-weather, long range remote sensing systems. However, radar's continued utility and application in wide-ranging areas is fundamentally dependent on the ability to produce high-quality, artifact-free imagery. To date, the use of radar to identify and image moving objects remains of great interest, and it is well known that motion in the scene gives rise to mispositioning or streaking when target motion is not addressed. Many techniques have been developed to handle moving objects, but these techniques make use of the start-stop approximation, in which a target in motion is assumed to be momentarily stationary while it is being interrogated by a radar pulse. A new linearized imaging theory that combines the spatial, temporal and spectral aspects of scattered waves has been developed. This thesis studies the performance of this new imaging scheme via analysis of the point spread function. It is shown that the imaging PSF localizes, and is translation invariant in phase-space. It is also shown that the behavior of the imaging system is dependent on the aperture geometry and choice of radar waveforms transmitted
Advanced research into moving target imaging using multistatic radar by Grant H Riedl ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Current active imaging algorithms for moving targets suffer from issues of incorrect positions (spatial) and streaking artifacts (temporal). Using the Cheney/Borden procedure, we investigated combining the spatial, temporal, and spectral aspects of real and synthetic aperture radar images. We code the Cheney/Borden algorithm to include the target velocity, include an appropriate threshold, and illustrate how multistatic radar can determine a target's location in phase space. By running simulations on single and multiple moving targets, we showed that an iteration of velocity and position choices for targets enhanced the correlation map for multistatic radar systems
Radar Scattering Center Localization by Subspace Fitting ( )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The application of radar data to the problem of noncooperative target recognition (NCTR) usually begins by estimating the position and strength of the significant scattering centers from the bright spot locations of a radar image (e.g., high range resolution (HRR) or inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR)). In practical situations, these images are usually contaminated by noise and can be of very low quality resolution-factors that confound the scattering center localization process and can preclude NCTR by radar means. We describe a simple method, based on subspace fitting techniques, that can be applied to the position and strength estimation problem in this environment. The scheme is robust against noise corruption and allows for super-resolved estimates of all (or some) of the scatterers. Examples based on synthetic data are presented
Application of Maximum Entropy Analysis to ISAR Imagery and Spurious Scatterer Location in Anechoic Chambers ( )
1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The maximum entropy method is applied in two problems, both of which require high resolution imaging from incomplete data
Radar polarimetry by Siow Yin Yong ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Radar polarimetry is a recent development seeing active research only in the last few decades. The phenomenon that optimal (maximal power) reflected fields exist in both the co-polarized and cross polarized channels of the receiving radar antenna was first introduced by Kennaugh and Huynen. Current research efforts focus on target scattering matrices and relating them to physical attributes of the target. This thesis provides a comprehensive survey of the polarimetry theories that have been put forth by various researchers to characterize, manipulate and optimize target radar returns via polarization states. One such theory is the Target Decomposition (TD) theorem that seeks to decompose the target returns into individual scattering mechanisms. The topic of optimization of polarization states of the incident field for maximizing power return is also examined. Two models are implemented in Matlab to verify and demonstrate these polarimetry theories. The first model uses TD theorems to simulate foliage clutter and study its effect on the polarization of the incident electric field. A (simulated) static dihedral target is introduced and its effect on wave polarization is also simulated. The second model studies optimization of polarization states. Both models are able to produce the expected results for known canonical targets
Through-the-wall imaging from electromagnetic scattered field measurements by Jerry Kim ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
We investigate an inverse imaging problem for TWI (Through-the-wall Imaging) using frequencies between 500 GHz and 1 THz. Starting from first principles, this thesis uses Maxwells equations to develop a model for the transmission Greens function. This simplified model is then used in a Lippman-Schwinger integral equation to predict the scattered field associated with interrogating THz waves. We investigate the effects of wave propagation through isotropic media, and present methods for creating images from the scattered field. These methods are examined using simulated data
Bi-spectral method for radar target recognition by Jiunn Wah Yeo ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Target recognition and identification in battlefields has been a crucial determinant to the ultimate success or failure of modern military campaigns. Since World War II, the Identification of Friend or Foe (IFF) systems installed in radar systems have served as the primary cooperative target identification techniques based on the "question and answer" interrogation loop of unidentified aircraft. However, the IFF system has a number of limitations that pose significant challenges in the positive identification of hostile and neutral aircrafts, which can lead to a catastrophic outcome of fratricide and the possible elimination of a friendly or commercial aircraft. To reduce the probability of fratricide and enhance the effectiveness and robustness of target identification, this research will examine the radar Non-Cooperative Target Recognition (NCTR) technique of using the bi-spectral signatures of backscattered radar signals. The basic idea is that the geometry of the target scatterers and their mutual interactions impose features in the reflected radar signal that are typical and unique to the target of interests. The bi-spectrum can be used to detect these multiple interactions features which then may be used to match against a reference database that contains signatures of different target types for recognition and identification
THz-imaging Through-the-Wall using the Born and Rytov approximation by Kwangmoon Lee ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
We investigated an inverse imaging problem by applying the Rytov approximation for Through-the-Wall Imaging using THz waves. In the beginning, we studied some properties of THz waves and the physical conditions for THz imaging in matter. Then we started with Maxwell's equations to derive a model for the transmission of Green's functions and used a Lippman-Schwinger integral equation and Rytov approximation to predict the scattered field. We applied the L-curve method for the selection of regularization parameters, and then presented the reconstruction algorithm and illustrated the result with numerical simulations. We also compared this result to the one obtained by the Born approximation
 
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