WorldCat Identities

LaMarre, Thomas 1959-

Overview
Works: 26 works in 76 publications in 3 languages and 3,225 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Science fiction  Bibliography  Periodicals  Academic theses  Fiction 
Roles: Author, Editor, 958
Classifications: NC1766.J3, 791.43340952
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Thomas LaMarre
The anime machine : a media theory of animation by Thomas LaMarre( )

14 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 939 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Despite the longevity of animation and its significance within the history of cinema, film theorists have focused on live-action motion pictures and largely ignored hand-drawn and computer-generated movies. Thomas Lamarre contends that the history, techniques, and complex visual language of animation, particularly Japanese animation, demands serious and sustained engagement, and in The Anime Machine he lays the foundation for a new critical theory for reading Japanese animation, showing how anime fundamentally differs from other visual media. The Anime Machine defines the visual characteristics of anime and the meanings generated by those specifically 'animetic' effects -- the multiplanar image, the distributive field of vision, exploded projection, modulation, and other techniques of character animation -- through close analysis of major films and television series, studios, animators, and directors, as well as Japanese theories of animation. Lamarre first addresses the technology of anime: the cells on which the images are drawn, the animation stand at which the animator works, the layers of drawings in a frame, the techniques of drawing and blurring lines, how characters are made to move. He then examines foundational works of anime, including the films and television series of Miyazaki Hayao and Anno Hideaki, the multimedia art of Murakami Takashi, and CLAMP's manga and anime adaptations, to illuminate the profound connections between animators, characters, spectators, and technology. Working at the intersection of the philosophy of technology and the history of thought, Lamarre explores how anime and its related media entail material orientations and demonstrates concretely how the 'animetic machine' encourages a specific approach to thinking about technology and opens new ways for understanding our place in the technologized world around us."--Publisher description
Uncovering Heian Japan : an archaeology of sensation and inscription by Thomas LaMarre( )

10 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 639 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Death sentences by Chiaki Kawamata( )

6 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 531 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A young poet, Who May, pens one disturbing poem after another until he creates a poem that can kill, which sparks a "magic poem plague" when copies are mailed to all of his friends
Mechademia 6 : User Enhanced by Frenchy Lunning( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 336 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Manga and anime inspire a wide range of creative activities for fans: blogging and contributing to databases, making elaborate cosplay costumes, producing dôjinshi (amateur) manga and scanlations, and engaging in fansubbing and DIY animation. Indeed, fans can no longer be considered passive consumers of popular culture easily duped by corporations and their industrial-capitalist ideologies. They are now more accurately described as users, in whose hands cultural commodities can provide instant gratification but also need to be understood as creative spaces that can be inhabited, modified, and
The anime ecology : a genealogy of television, animation, and game media by Thomas LaMarre( )

7 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 277 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"With the release of author Thomas Lamarre's field-defining study The Anime Machine, critics established Lamarre as a leading voice in the field of Japanese animation. He now returns with The Anime Ecology, broadening his insights to give a complete account of anime's relationship to television while placing it in important historical and global frameworks. Lamarre takes advantage of the overlaps between television, anime, and new media--from console games and video to iOS games and streaming--to show how animation helps us think through television in the contemporary moment. He offers remarkable close readings of individual anime while demonstrating how infrastructures and platforms have transformed anime into emergent media (such as social media and transmedia) and launched it worldwide. Thoughtful, thorough illustrations plus exhaustive research and an impressive scope make The anime ecology at once an essential reference book, a valuable resource for scholars, and a foundational textbook for students"--
Shadows on the screen : Tanizaki Junʼichirō on cinema and "oriental" aesthetics by Thomas LaMarre( Book )

7 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 217 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In recent years, the impact of new media and new technologies has renewed interest in the emergence of cinema and film criticism. Yet studies to date have focused almost exclusively on Western cinema and problems of Western modernity. Shadows on the Screen offers a challenging new reevaluation of these issues. In addition to extensively annotated translations of the long-neglected film work of the celebrated Japanese writer, Tanizaki Jun'ichirô, Thomas LaMarre offers a series of commentaries with an original and sustained analysis of how Tanizaki grappled with the temporal paradoxes of non-Western modernity in his film work. Written largely between 1917 and 1926, Tanizaki's film stories and screenplays continue to delight and disturb readers with their exploration of the racial and sexual perversion implicit in the newly cinematized modern world. Read in conjunction with his film work, Tanizaki's “Orientalist” essays betray their cinematic sources, revealing the profound links between traditionalism and cinematic modernism, between national identity and colonial ambivalence. Through the translation and analysis of Tanizaki's film work, Shadows on the Screen provides an invaluable historical and conceptual guide both to the emergence of cinema and film criticism in Japan and to the problem of Japanese modernity."--Publisher
Impacts of modernities( Book )

8 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 154 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Impacts of Modernities, the third volume of the Traces series, explores the problem of modernity, with an emphasis on the impact of Western modernity on East Asia. While the essays generally acknowledge modernity as a problem or even failure, in order to challenge modernization and modernization theory, the volume presents a number of different approaches to, and evaluations of, modernity in historical and contemporary frameworks. One group of essays looks at the complex relations between modernity and production of space, place and identity. Contributors consider the spatializing tendencies of modernity, looking at how resistance to modernization has tended to rely on the production of national and local identities, which may serve to reproduce and reinforce the logic of modernization in new registers. Of particular importance is the legacy of comparativism in our contemporary disciplines. Other essays explore the historically specific relations that arise between nation, empire and representation. Contributors reconsider the alleged particularity of national languages and scripts, asking whether the insistence on the particular does not already entail an access to the universal and thus maybe to empire. Still other essays question whether the prime characteristics of modern power -- subjection and sovereignty -- continue to define power relations within the contemporary world order. To what extent is it now possible to think power formations and resistance beyond the modern, otherwise than modernity?"--Back cover
Lines of sight( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Lines of Sight, the seventh volume in the Mechademia series, an annual forum devoted to Japanese anime and manga, explores the various ways in which anime, manga, digital media, fan culture, and Japanese art--from scroll paintings to superflat--challenge, undermine, or disregard the concept of Cartesian (or one-point) perspective, the dominant mode of visual culture in the West since the seventeenth century. More than just a visual mode or geometric system, Cartesianism has shaped nearly every aspect of modern rational thought, from mathematics and science to philosophy and history. Framed by Thomas Lamarre's introduction, "Radical Perspectivalism," the essays here approach Japanese popular culture as a visual mode that employs non-Cartesian formations, which by extension make possible new configurations of perception and knowledge. Whether by shattering the illusion of visual or narrative seamlessness through the use of multiple layers or irregular layouts, blurring the divide between viewer and creator, providing diverse perspectives within a single work of art, or rejecting dualism, causality, and other hallmarks of Cartesianism, anime and manga offer in their radicalization of perspective the potential for aesthetic and even political transformation." -- Publisher's description
Anime mashīn : gurōbaru media to shite no Nihon animēshon by Thomas LaMarre( Book )

3 editions published in 2013 in Japanese and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gilbert Simondon and the philosophy of the transindividual by Muriel Combes( Book )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gilbert Simondon (1924-1989), one of the most influential contemporary French philosophers, published only three works: L'individu et sa gense physico-biologique (The individual and its physico-biological genesis, 1964) and L'individuation psychique et collective (Psychic and collective individuation, 1989), both drawn from his doctoral thesis, and Du mode d'existence des objets techniques (On the mode of existence of technical objects, 1958). It is this last work that brought Simondon into the public eye; as a consequence, he has been considered a "thinker of technics" and cited often in pedagogical reports on teaching technology. Yet Simondon was a philosopher whose ambitions lay in an in-depth renewal of ontology as a process of individuation--that is, how individuals come into being, persist, and transform. In this accessible yet rigorous introduction to Simondon's work, Muriel Combes helps to bridge the gap between Simondon's account of technics and his philosophy of individuation. Some thinkers have found inspiration in Simondon's philosophy of individuation, notably Gilles Deleuze and Flix Guattari. Combes's account, first published in French in 1999, is one of the only studies of Simondon to appear in English. Combes breaks new ground, exploring an ethics and politics adequate to Simondon's hypothesis of preindividual being, considering through the lens of transindividual philosophy what form a nonservile relation to technology might take today. Her book is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand Simondon's work. (Fuente: MIT Press)
Mechademia 7 : Lines of Sight by Thomas LaMarre( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lines of Sight-the seventh volume in the Mechademia series, an annual forum devoted to Japanese anime and manga-explores the various ways in which anime, manga, digital media, fan culture, and Japanese art-from scroll paintings to superflat-challenge, undermine, or disregard the concept of Cartesian (or one-point) perspective, the dominant mode of visual culture in the West since the seventeenth century. More than just a visual mode or geometric system, Cartesianism has shaped nearly every aspect of modern rational thought, from mathematics and science to philosophy and history. Framed by Thoma
Anime by Thomas LaMarre( )

in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pain, filth and stupefaction : forms of authority and mediation in the late Meiji novel by Thomas LaMarre( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Yin ji = Traces( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in Chinese and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ben shu shou ru de wen zhang bao kuo"you ling si de bi jiao", "zhi min di jin dai hua zhi lu cong bai yue zhi han jiang", "min zu yin le xue de mao dun xing", "ke xue shi jie guan, Wen hua lun zhan yu zhi shi de zai fen lei"deng
Cartoon Life : Non-Localized Movement and Anti-Production in Animation by Thomas LaMarre( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Unstating the classical moment : the logic of forms and forces in Heian Japan by Thomas LaMarre( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Writing doubled over, broken : provisional names, acrostic poems, and the perpetual context of doubles in Heian Japan by Thomas LaMarre( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Can writing go on without a mind? (orality, literacy, ideography, Japanology) by Thomas LaMarre( Recording )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

LaMarre argues that while orality is associated with the natural life world, writing is a form of alienation from nature. He describes Japanese orality as an unmediated link between mind and culture; on the other hand, ideographs and the figurative lose impact when presented formally. Commentary by Timothy Murray, professor of English, Cornell. Discussion follows
Image Romanticism and the Responsibility of Cinema: The Indexical Imagination in Japanese Film by Philip James Kaffen( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This dissertation examines what I call image romanticism in Japanese cinema. Romanticism in Japan should be understood as the desire for the revelation of a world unmediated by the logic of representation, a logic central to Western "civilization and enlightenment." Romanticism sought to critique and overcome this "colonial" logic through the immediacy of the autonomous living text--as poetry, the pure spirit of Japan, or the kokutai (national essence); it thereby developed an intimate but unstable relationship with wartime powers. While helping to supply the aesthetic force for the realization of the East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere, romanticism nonetheless came under the watchful eyes of the state
Bacterial cultures and linguistic colonies : Mori Rintaro's experiments with history, science, and language by Thomas LaMarre( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.38 (from 0.17 for Mechademia ... to 0.97 for Cartoon Li ...)

Uncovering Heian Japan : an archaeology of sensation and inscription
Covers
Uncovering Heian Japan : an archaeology of sensation and inscriptionShadows on the screen : Tanizaki Junʼichirō on cinema and "oriental" aestheticsImpacts of modernities
Alternative Names
La Marre, Thomas 1959-

Marre, Thomas la 1959-

Ramāru, Tōmasu 1959-

Thomas LaMarre Amerikaans hoogleraar

Thomas Lamarre US-amerikanischer Kommunikationswissenschaftler und Japanologe

라마르, 토마스 1959-

ラマール, トーマス

Languages