WorldCat Identities

Crosse, Andrew 1784-1855

Overview
Works: 27 works in 37 publications in 1 language and 322 library holdings
Genres: Patents 
Roles: Author
Classifications: QC515.C8,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Andrew Crosse
 
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Most widely held works by Andrew Crosse
Memorials, scientific and literary, of Andrew Crosse, the electrician by Andrew Crosse( Book )

8 editions published between 1857 and 2014 in English and held by 172 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Memorials Scientific and Literary, of Andrew Crosse, the Electrician by Cornelia A. H Crosse( Book )

2 editions published in 1857 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Red-letter Days of my Life : (Crosse) In Two Volumes by Andrew Crosse( Book )

2 editions published in 1892 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ockham, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Discussing, in detail and at length, an experiment she witnessed at Somerledge that appears to have involved a divining rod; referring to the help of Sir James Bathurst to "prevent the possibility of any deception;" adding that she and Lord Lovelace "both tried with the twig over some of the water-courses where the man had succeeded, but neither of us seem to possess the power."
Ashley Combe, to Mr. Crosse by William King-Noel Lovelace( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Saying that due to various circumstances they need to reschedule their visit to him; proposing they arrive on Saturday the 30th and stay until Monday the 2nd of December
Ashley-Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )

1 edition published in 1843 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Saying she has sent him a "copy of the paper I lately published in Taylor's Scientific Memoirs;" commenting that she has "lived almost entirely secluded. Those who are in earnest & with single mind devoted to any great object in life, must find this occasionally inevitable; & when (as has been my case during the last 10 months), family affairs of a harassing & complicated description, & also very strange & uncertain states of health, are superadded to the first cause, you will not wonder at having heard nothing from me, because you have experience & candor enough to perceive & know that God has not given to us (in this state of existence) more than very limited powers of physical inter-communication & expression of one's ideas & feeling. Would that every thought of mine could be father to the expression of it, to the communication of it to other sentient & thinking beings!;" asking if he can visit and telling him that Mr. Babbage is "likely to be here at the time I mention;" adding that she will "be very desirous of again seeing you. You know what that means from me, & that it is no [illegible] or humbug, but the simple expression & result of the respect & attraction I feel for a mind that ventures to read direct in God's own book, & not merely thro' man's translation of that same vast & mighty work."
Specification of Andrew Crosse : extracting metals from ores by Great Britain( Book )

1 edition published in 1857 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

[Poem about death.] by Andrew Crosse( )

1 edition published in 1838 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Letter by William Buckland( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Five A.L.S. to various correspondents including Ransom and Crosse, and an envelope
Ashley-Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )

1 edition published in 1842 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Asking him to send her "accounts of the old experiments, & the more recent ones as well. All is well as usual here. I play as much, perhaps more, than ever; & really do get on gloriously. You know that I believe no creature ever could will things like a Byron. And perhaps that is at the bottom of the genius-like tendencies in my family. We can throw our whole life & existence for the time-being into whatever we will to do & accomplish. You know perhaps the family motto "Crede Byron"! I think not inappropriate; & especially when united to that of the King's "Labor ipse voluptas". Now as I have married that motto, both literally, & in my whole ideas & nature, I mean to do what I mean to do!;" reminding him that his son promised to visit them in Surrey
Letters by Andrew Crosse( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Two A.L.S. (undated, and 1842 Aug. 25), the former making a dinner appointment with Buckland, the latter recounting Crosse's theory of batteries creating organic life
Ashley Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )

1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Explaining that she thinks it best to send him the documents now " & not delay showing them until we meet. I am anxious that we should try the experiments mentioned; & you may require a little preparation possibly for that purpose;" discussing the experiments she would like to undertake and the areas she would like to study; mentioning specifically "an experiment with the muscles of frogs;" expressing the desire "to make a battery described in the 13th No. of the Archives de l'Electricité, p. 160;" adding that she is "anxious to consult him "about the most convenient & manageable & portable forms for obtaining constantly-acting batteries; not great intensity but continual & interrupted action. Some of my own views make it necessary for me to use electricity as my prime-minister, in order to test certain points experimentally as to the nature & putting-together (con-sti-tu-tion) of the molecules of matter. It is therefore a great object to me to get effective & ever-ready electrical agents at my disposal; & to become skilful in manipulating with these. By eventually bringing high Analysis to bear on my experimental studies, I hope one day to do much!"
Red-letter Days of my Life : (Crosse) In Two Volumes by Andrew Crosse( Book )

1 edition published in 1892 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ashley Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )

1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Explaining that she might have to postpone his visit as she is "going on in all the wrong way, I am sorry to say. Last night in the middle of the night, I had a seizure of Angina Pectoris & I am so knocked to pieces that I doubt much if I can put my plans in execution at the time fixed. At the same time, I often alter very rapidly; & become quite myself & well even in a very few hours;" adding "It is mortal agony, for the time-being.--I have it occasionally."
Ashley Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )

1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Discussing the plans for his visit to her and her visit to Bromfield; saying she is "anxious to try an experiment of my own with the apparatus you have prepared. For this purpose you will perhaps get me some fine iron filings, or iron dust of some kind. If a theory of mine is correct, the bar ought at the instant of the induced magnetism to attract the filings to the nodal lines of its fundamental note ... this is a very curious & important point to investigate; -- & if it is as I hope, would lead to some remarkable results;" thanking him for his comments on digestion; discussing, at length and in detail, her digestive disorders and restricted diet; suggesting that perhaps Galvanism might be helpful to her "in winter to keep up my circulation;" expressing appreciation for his understanding of her ailments; adding "It seems to me that brain-working people of the particular caste which both you & I are, often have a strange high-tension tendency in the nervous & sensational systems, which leads to sufferings far worse than any that accompany the greater part of real diseases & fatal illnesses;" confirming what she will need to have on hand at Bromfield for her dietary restrictions
Richard Owen papers by Richard Owen( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ALS. Owen sends a report on a lecture on New Zealand birds to a Miss Bailey and wishes a Mr. Pearson professional success in Lancaster. The electrician Andrew Crosse writes to Owen of the discovery of insects in metallic solutions supposed to be destructive to organic life
Ashley Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )

1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Explaining that she has been ill and "just emerging from one of my miserable attacks of Gastritis (Gastric Fever);" telling him that "There is not only much that is akin, in principles & feelings, between our two minds, but there is just that difference & that peculiar adaptation of the differences in our characteristics, which would fit us to be of mutual benefit. The one could supply the deficiencies of the other; & the one could enhance the strong points of the other. I shall therefore by degrees communicate to you the whole of my present views & plans. I have done so to no other scientific person, as yet. I am too well aware what scientific perfidy is capable of, to say the truth. But that thought cannot come into consideration between you & me. On the other hand I know you will equally trust me. I need not say that respecting any thing derived from you, I should glory in acknowledging my debt, if in future writings in discoveries of my own I could point out those links of my chain which should be yours. Depend on it that two heads are better than one, (if they don't quarrel, always understood; & unluckily philosophers generally do quarrel.);" asking if he would send her "some of Corelli's music? I know you like it & perhaps I could pick out parts for the Harp."
Ockham Park, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Apologizing for taking so long to reply; saying that she is "in a very musical phase (which you will not be sorry to hear), and I am giving a good deal of time to it;" commenting that his "account & diagram of the apparatus seems promising. Have you yet actually put it into operation:" saying that "Dr. Carpenter will be very much interested in the progress of this renewed experiment. We talk of trying it ourselves now shortly but we find many difficulties & that to test the results with any certainty necessitates a quantity & sort of preparation and of appareil altogether, which only exists in an established laboratory;" It is not yet certain that Dr. Carpenter will permanently remain with us; & this still-existing doubt has made us delay many things we may perhaps do if he does remain;" saying that her health has improved; crediting her improved health to his suggestions when she was at Bromfield; asking if he has heard "any more about Mesmerism? And what are your present opinions upon it? I quite agree with you that your best & ... refuge from all troubles is in your Science. That is a great soother of agitated feelings, & in this respect you are indeed a fortunate person. I generally see indeed that there is compensation of some kind or other, in all situations; & I think lots are very even in this world on the whole;" sending her regards to Mrs. Crosse
Clifton, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )

1 edition published in 1843 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Letting him know that "circumstances have taken me away from Ashley at present, & that my return is uncertain. I am now with my mother; & I may return perhaps in a fortnight, or it may be longer;" asking what he and his son would like to do with regard to their visit; expressing her disappointment at missing him
Ashley-Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )

1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Thanking him for his note and discussing logistics for a visit and a reciprocal visit by her to Bromfield. Discussing, at length and in detail, her passion for Science; saying " ... I am more than ever now the Bride of Science. Religion to me is Science, & Science is Religion. In that deeply felt truth, lies the secret of my intense devotion to the reading of God's natural works. It is reading Him, His Will, His Intelligence: & [illegible] again is learning to obey & to follow (to the best of our power) that Will! For he who reads, who interprets the Divinity with a true & simple heart then obeys & submits in acts & feelings as by an impulse & instructs. He can't help doing so. At least so it appears to me;" And when I behold the scientific, & so-called philosophers, full of selfish feelings & of the tendency to war against circumstances & Providence, I say to myself: They are not true priests. They are but half-prophets, if not absolutely false ones. They have read the great page simply with the physical eye, & with none of the spirit within. The intellectual, the moral, the religious, seem to me all naturally bound up & inter-linked together in one great & harmonious whole; and I hope to live to demonstrate this to mankind more forcibly than I think it is as yet felt in the world;" continuing, at length and in detail, to discuss the relationship between religion and science; concluding with a lengthy discussion of her "dreadful physical sufferings" that relate "chiefly with the digestive functions, of no common degree & kind. This has nothing to do with a weakly constitution, & in fact it appears to me to be the result of the fine-ness & intensity & power of my nervous system. So that in truth, my illness -- my weakness - is the result of my strength;" describing what her physical sufferings have taught her; thanking him for his understanding and telling him "How pleasant is it always to communicate with one who like you can understand what one says & feels, whether he agrees with it or not!"
 
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Alternative Names
Andrew Crosse britischer Naturforscher

Andrew Crosse Brits natuurkundige (1784-1855)

Andrew Crosse científico británico

Кросс, Эндрю

Languages
English (36)