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University of London Royal Holloway ICT4D Centre

Overview
Works: 257 works in 273 publications in 2 languages and 1,412 library holdings
Genres: History  Conference papers and proceedings  Sources  Drama  Periodicals  Handbooks and manuals 
Classifications: HT861, 306.362
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Most widely held works about University of London
 
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Most widely held works by University of London
Ancient slavery and abolition : from Hobbes to Hollywood( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 154 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Originating in a conference organised in 2007 by the Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome at Royal Holloway, University of London, and held at the British Library ... this accessible volume offers a pathbreaking study of the role played by the interpreters of ancient Greek and roman texts in the debates over the abolition of slavery. Focusing on Britain, North America, the Caribbean, and South Africa from the late 17th century, the essays examine the arguments of critics and defenders of slavery and legacy of slavery, in later periods."--Jacket
Bedford Square 3 : new writing from the Royal Holloway Creative Writing Programme( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bedford Square : new writing from the Royal Holloway Creative Writing Programme( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bedford Square 2 : new writing from the Royal Holloway Creative Writing Programme( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Children, ICTs and development : capturing the potential, meeting the challenges by Dorothea Kleine( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report explores the ways in which information and communication technologies (ICTs) can contribute to efforts towards meeting child-focused development goals. The diffusion of ICTs has been highly uneven, and it is clear that digital divides not only trace but can also further deepen existing social divides, between income-rich and income-poor, between urban and rural dwellers, between women and men, and girls and boys. The report therefore supports UNICEF in efforts to further develop and disseminate good practice regarding ICT4D and children. UNICEF is committed to work for the most marginalized children in society and a focus on equity and technology runs throughout the research. The pioneering research process consisted of a review of relevant literature and in-depth interviews with 35 experts in the field connecting ICT4D with child-focused development, thus providing one of the most comprehensive overviews of the subject to date. The literature review focuses on the topics of extreme poverty, maternal and child health, nutrition, access to education, governance and accountability, and eParticipation, children and the internet. This provides a foundation for the eight analytical themes, which are grounded in the expert interviews with practitioners, policy makers and academics. The first theme, access and equity, explores the complex socio-political factors which dictate availability and affordability of ICTs for children. It highlights the importance of focusing on children in the most disadvantaged city districts and remote regions and shows how ICT can both exacerbate and reduce pre-existing inequalities for children. The second theme, gender, emphasizes the specific challenges for girls in accessing and utilizing ICT. It explores some of the initiatives that are working to reduce the gender divide in ICT and identifies technology-related risks that are particularly likely to affect girls. The third theme focuses on the important role that intermediaries play, assessing who controls access to and use of ICTs and the implications that this has for e-health and e-learning. Alongside this, the discussion of intermediaries also emphasizes the role of commercial interests affecting the distribution patterns of ICTs. The fourth issue the analysis engages with is local demand and appropriate design. It documents interviewee perspectives regarding appropriate responses to local demand and emphasizes the importance of contextualised, user-centred approaches to design. The fifth theme brings together as focal areas: accountability, open data, voice and participation. The interviewees repeatedly identified the interplay between these four aspects and explained the potential for advances in data collection to lead to more responsive, adaptive and participatory policy making and programming. The sixth topic engages with pilots, scale and sustainability: these provoked diverse perspectives from the interviewees as they are closely linked to the complex question of what constitutes a successful child-focused ICT for development programmes. The analysis examines the way in which pilot programmes are often overly-optimistic and explores the diverging views of how important the scaling-up of initiatives should be. The seventh theme concentrates on the private sector, partnerships, entrepreneurship and Free and Open Source Software (FOSS). The interviewees expressed various perspectives on private sector involvement in child-focused ICT initiatives, disagreeing as to whether this influence is generally positive or negative. There was significant, though not universal, commitment to promoting FOSS, with interviewees explaining the benefits for scalability and sustainability. The final issue engages with innovation, evaluation and failure. Interviewees noted the complexity inherent in the terms. The analysis explains that from an equity perspective innovative use of ICT needs to focus on reaching more marginalized groups first and emphasizes the ongoing need for evidence building and learning through evaluation. Experts noted that in many initiatives related to ICT4D, children should be considered as a specific, though not homogenous, category and special attention should be given to their needs. 2 The report concludes by returning to the seven overarching questions which guided the research process. It considers how ICTs can help with reducing inequality, explores the risk that they can increase inequality, and notes where they might offer quick wins for child-focused development objectives. It then explains how ICTs can contribute to the future of child-focused development efforts, how they can be integrated more effectively in other child-focused development efforts, and how ICT projects can assist the most vulnerable children. Finally, it proposes how the work of UNICEF and the field of ICT4D can contribute to one another and offers a reflection from the perspective of the report authors. ICTs are not a technical sphere detached from the complex realities of children's lives. They are increasingly woven into the very fabric of life, in income-rich and increasingly in incomepoor countries. It is clear that if there is no targeted engagement with these socio-technical innovations, they are likely to reinforce existing inequalities. It follows that a focus on children and on greater equity leads to an active and reflective engagement with the potential and challenges of ICT for development, targeting in particular marginalized children. This report serves as a key contribution on which to build informed dialogue and decision making, developed jointly between research, policy and practice
The York Harrowing of Hell( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English, Middle and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Early music online( )

in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Early Music Online is a pilot project in which 300 of the world's earliest surviving volumes of printed music, held in the British Library, have been digitized and made freely available online
Shakespeare and the limits of national culture by Linda Colley( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Socialism in France : the future in the past? : an inaugural lecture by Pamela M Pilbeam( Book )

2 editions published between 1996 and 1997 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mass murder and German society in the Third Reich : interpretations and dilemmas : presented at Royal Holloway, University of London 6th March 2001 by Saul Friedländer( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Machine learning : progress and prospects : an inaugural lecture by A Gammerman( Book )

2 editions published between 1996 and 1997 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The word among stones : poems by Patricia Ball( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The bombe - a remarkable logic machine by Donald Watts Davies( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Department of Physics : undergraduate studies : Royal Holloway, University of London by University of London( Book )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annual review & financial statements by University of London( )

in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Whatever happened to the history of the nun? by Olwen H Hufton( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Breaking army and air force Enigma : German security counter-measures and how Bletchley Park's Hut 6 overcame them( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The German battleships by Peter Jarvis( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The obsidian evidence for the scale of social life during the palaeolithic by Theodora Moutsiou( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The social aspect of modern hominin behaviour is a neglected subject within recent Palaeolithic research. This thesis addresses this issue arguing that modern social behaviour is reflected in the hominin ability to create and maintain extended social networks where relatedness is successfully sustained in absentia. Archaeologically, modern social behaviour can be detected through the investigation of raw material movement. This thesis argues that by concentrating on materials that are rare, distinctive and their origins can be securely identified it is possible to reconstruct the dimensions of the exchange networks involved in their circulation. The proposition being tested is that the greater the distances of raw material movement the more advanced the behavioural abilities of the individuals involved in the transfers. Obsidian provides an opportunity to reconstruct the scale of its movement and to use these data to infer the changing scale of social life during the Palaeolithic. Using the distances of obsidian movement a network model is developed and used in the reconstruction of the Palaeolithic social landscape. This research brings together for the first time all the published instances of obsidian use during the Palaeolithic. Obsidian-bearing sites from the Palaeolithic and located in Africa, Europe and the Near East are analysed with the aim of elucidating the evolution of modern social behaviour. GtJi15 (Kenya) and Bodrogkerestúr (Hungary) serve as the case studies for the exploration of the distance effect on technological and typological issues of the obsidian movement. The research demonstrated a strong correlation between obsidian use and long distances. The choice of obsidian makes sense within a system of exchange in which hominins chose to obtain their materials from elsewhere in order to maintain social links with other, more distant, groups. I argue that the scale of obsidian movement, although conditioned by a number of climatic, ecological and anatomical constraints, is actually rooted in social grounds. I thereby reject theories that see behavioural modernity as a recent advance in human history and argue for modern behaviour as gradual process that was initiated in East Africa at least as early as the Middle Stone Age
The Post Office at War and Fenny Stratford Repeater Station by John Pether( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Ancient slavery and abolition : from Hobbes to Hollywood
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Bedford Square 3 : new writing from the Royal Holloway Creative Writing ProgrammeBedford Square : new writing from the Royal Holloway Creative Writing ProgrammeBedford Square 2 : new writing from the Royal Holloway Creative Writing Programme