WorldCat Identities

Pfaff, Tony

Overview
Works: 7 works in 24 publications in 1 language and 823 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings  History 
Classifications: U22, 363.209567
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Tony Pfaff Publications about Tony Pfaff
Publications by  Tony Pfaff Publications by Tony Pfaff
Most widely held works by Tony Pfaff
Development and reform of the Iraqi police forces by Tony Pfaff ( )
5 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 241 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"This paper seeks to show how social, political, cultural, and environmental factors have combined to impede Iraqi police development in ways that are predictable, understandable, and, with external help, resolvable. The corruption and abuse found in the Iraqi police services cannot simply be explained by poor leadership, the actions of a few corrupt individuals, or even the competing agendas of the various militias that are fighting for influence in post-Saddam Iraq. Rather, one must explain why such practices occur despite the fact they are unacceptable according to Iraqi cultural norms." -- P. v
Resolving ethical challenges in an era of persistent conflict by Tony Pfaff ( )
4 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 236 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In this monograph, Colonel Tony Pfaff explores the ethical challenges facing the Army in an era of persistent conflict dominated by a variety of irregular threats. Pfaff argues that these challenges arise because irregular adversaries change the character of their war from imposing one's will on the enemy to compelling the enemy to accept one's interest. While this shift may seem subtle, Pfaff argues, it suggests a number of important practical and ethical implications for our way of war. Formerly, civilians were largely separable from warfighting, meaning that our strategies of annihilation and attrition were the most effective--and ethical--paths to victory. But now, when combating irregular threats, civilians are no longer separable from warfighting. Consequently, strategies of annihilation and attrition not only undermine a successful resolution of the conflict, but they are unethical. This last point suggests that the Army needs to adapt the PME to account for these changes and to adopt a number of policies and procedures to account for the expanded role irregular conflicts demand Soldiers play
Peacekeeping and the just war tradition by Tony Pfaff ( Book )
7 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Major Tony Pfaff, a former Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the United States Military Academy, addresses an important source of much of the confusion that currently surrounds many of the Operations Other Than War (OOTW) that the military finds itself participating in with increasing frequency. The author points out that, though the source of this confusion is primarily ethical, it has important operational implications as well. In the Just War Tradition, as well as the Law of War, there has always been a tension between winning and fighting well, and the peacekeeping environment does not change this. Commonly, the resolution of this tension is expressed in the maxim: always use the least amount of force necessary to achieve the military objective. This maxim applies, regardless of what environment one is in. The author's contention is, however, that the understanding of necessary is radically different in the peacekeeping environment than it is in more conventional operations. Failure to understand this results in a great deal of confusion as soldiers try to apply an ethic designed for dealing with enemies in environments where there are none
Army professionalism, the military ethic, and officership in the 21st century by Don M Snider ( )
5 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 134 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The authors address what they--and many others--perceived to be a decline in military professionalism in the Army officer corps. The authors first describe the ethical, technical, and political components of military professionalism and then address the causes for the decline. They conclude by proposing a set of principles which, if adhered to, will reinvigorate the vision of the officer corps and motivate the corps to selfless service
"--To insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defence--" : papers from the Conference on Homeland Protection by Max G Manwaring ( Book )
1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 47 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
On April 11-13, 2000, the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute sponsored a major conference that examined what the Department of Defense must do "to insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence . . ., given the increasing contemporary threats to the U.S. homeland. This book highlights the issues and themes that ran through the conference. As such, it is not a comprehensive record of the proceedings. It is organized as an anthology of the best of a series of outstanding conference presentations, revised in light of the discussions that took place there. Finally, the anthology is complemented by an overview and four specific recommendations. Those recommendations look to the future and place emphasis on the transformation strategy that conference participants considered essential to safeguard the American homeland now and into the future
Peacekeeping and the Just War Tradition ( )
1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Major Tony Pfaff, a former Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the United States Military Academy, addresses an important source of much of the confusion that currently surrounds many of the Operations Other Than War (OOTW) that the military finds itself participating in with increasing frequency. The author points out that, though the source of this confusion is primarily ethical, it has important operational implications as well. In the Just War Tradition, as well as the Law of War, there has always been a tension between winning and fighting well, and the peacekeeping environment does not change this. Commonly, the resolution of this tension is expressed in the maxim: always use the least amount of force necessary to achieve the military objective. This maxim applies, regardless of what environment one is in. The author's contention is, however, that the understanding of necessary is radically different in the peacekeeping environment than it is in more conventional operations. Failure to understand this results in a great deal of confusion as soldiers try to apply an ethic designed for dealing with enemies in environments where there are none
Development and Reform of the Iraqi Police Forces ( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This paper will seek to show how social, political, cultural, and environmental factors have combined to impede Iraqi police development in ways that are predictable, understandable, and, with external help, resolvable. The corruption and abuse found in the Iraqi police services cannot simply be explained by poor leadership, the actions of a few corrupt individuals, or even the competing agendas of the various militias that are fighting for influence in post-Saddam Iraq. Rather, one must explain why such practices occur despite the fact they are unacceptable according to Iraqi cultural norms
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.80 (from 0.00 for Developmen ... to 0.84 for Peacekeepi ...)
Languages
English (24)