WorldCat Identities

Wilkins, Maurice 1916-2004

Overview
Works: 41 works in 80 publications in 3 languages and 2,208 library holdings
Genres: Biography  History  Guidebooks  Interviews  Archives 
Roles: Author, Interviewee
Classifications: QH505, 571.4092
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Maurice Wilkins
DNA( Visual )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 65 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A half-century ago, three teams with three different approaches raced to unravel the structure of DNA. This program blends interviews and commentary with extraordinary graphics to tell the story of how the unlikely duo of Jim Watson and Francis Crick won that race. Many of the principal figures in the quest discuss their frustrations and insights including Watson and Crick, Maurice Wilkins and Linus Pauling's son, Peter
DNA( Visual )

5 editions published between 2003 and 2008 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

First in a five-part series. A half-century ago, three teams with three different approaches raced to unravel the structure of DNA. Blends interviews and commentary with graphics to tell the story of how Jim Watson and Francis Crick won that race. Researchers discuss their frustrations and insights, including Watson and Crick, Maurice Wilkins and Linus Pauling's son, Peter. With computer animation and microphotography
The seeker : poems by Maurice Wilkins( Book )

2 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Poems of love & human freedom by Maurice Wilkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The third man of the double helix the autobiography of Maurice Wilkins by Maurice Wilkins( Book )

9 editions published between 2003 and 2010 in English and Japanese and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Working with Watson and Crick on the structure of DNA was a third man, Maurice Wilkins, based at King's College London with co-worker Rosalind Franklin. Franklin died in 1958 and the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the Double Helix was awarded to the three men in 1962. As Maurice Wilkins explains in The Third Man of the Double Helix, ' the Franklin/Wilkins story has often been told as an example of the unjustness of male scientists towards their women colleagues, and questions have. been raised over whether credit was distributed fairly when the Nobel Prize was awarded. I have found this situ
The DNA story( Visual )

3 editions published between 1973 and 1978 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Concentrates upon the role of chemistry and physics in finding the structure of DNA; it thereby sets the scene for the rise of molecular biology and its foundation in crystallography and model building. Stresses the pragmatic model building of Crick and Watson and their mistakes. Contrasts their work with the classical crystallography of the Kings' group as well as their embarrassments. Ends with the realization of the correct base pairings to the confirmation of the twin helical structure from Franklin's x-ray pictures of the a and b forms of DNA and thence to the final structure
Arduaine Garden by Maurice Wilkins( Book )

2 editions published between 1996 and 2002 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The autobiography of Maurice Wilkins by Maurice Wilkins( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Maurice Wilkins gives his side of the story behind the discovery of the double helical structure of DNA. He reveals his part in the life of Rosalind Franklin - viewed by many as having been unfairly treated by her male colleagues - and his work in the Manhattan Project and the development of radar
Sonnets of love and friendship by Maurice Wilkins( Book )

2 editions published in 1958 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Secret of photo 51( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On April 25, 1953, James Watson and Francis Crick published their groundbreaking discovery of the double helix structure of DNA, the molecule essential for passing on our genes and the secret of life. But their crucial breakthrough depended on the pioneering work of another biologist, Rosalind Franklin. She would never know that Watson and Crick had seen a crucial piece of her data without her permission. This was an X-ray image, Photo 51, that proved to be a vital clue in their decoding of the double helix. Contains interviews, historical photographs and reenactments
Molecular structure of nucleic acids : a structure for deoxyribonucleic acid by James D Watson( Book )

1 edition published in 1953 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The prizewinners( Visual )

2 editions published in 1962 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stephen Black in extended conversation with Drs Max Perutz and John Kendrew, Nobel Prize-Winners in Chemistry (1962) for their discovery of the molecular structure of haemoglobin and myoglobin, and with Francis Crick, James Watson and Maurice Wilkins, Nobel Laureates in Physiology and Medicine in the same year for their discovery of the molecular structure of deoxyribose nucleix acid (DNA). Also features Sir Lawrence Bragg (1890-1971) talking about the application of x-ray crystallography to molecular biology, and a brilliant short introduction to molecular biology for laymen by the late Professor Michael Swann of Edinburgh University (as he was then). Remarkable for its leisurely but serious approach, absence of hype and for the high intellectual level and clarity of much of the interview material
Oral history interview with David Bohm by David Bohm( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This twelve session interview with David Bohm covers his life and career in quantum physics. Topics discussed include: his family background and early influences; his undergraduate studies at Pennsylvania State University (1935-1939); introduction to quantum mechanics; his time at the California Institute of Technology (1939-1940) and his thesis on calculating scattering of light from a nebular gas cloud; University of California, Berkeley (1941-1943); political interests and activity including Marxism, socialism, communism, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (1943-1946); electrostatic focusing, nature of plasma, particle spin; effects of the atomic bombs on science and society; research associate for J. Robert Oppenheimer (1946-1947); superconductivity; Princeton University Institute for Advanced Study (1947-1950); wrote Quantum Theory; structure of elementary particles; meeting of theoretical physicists in the Pocono mountains circa 1948, attended by notable scientists including Julian Schwinger, Victor Weisskopf, Niels Bohr, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Richard Feynman; the end of his career in the United States; plasma and quantum theory research with Eugene Gross and David Pines; quantum theory book included theories of Niels Bohr, Wolfgang Pauli, Werner Heisenberg, Eugene Wigner, Erwin Schrodinger; the Un-American Acitivities Committee; University of Sao Paolo, Brazil (1951); work with Walter Schutzer, Ralph Shiller, Mario Schoenberg; visit to Jeanne-Pierre Vigier in Paris and Eric Burrup in England; lecturer at the Technion (Technical University), Israel (circa 1955-1956); University of Bristol, research associate (1957-1961); visit with Niels Bohr in Copenhagen, 1957; work on electron beams and flux in a magnetic field with Yack Aharonov; work on plasmas and the separation of the individual and collective behavior with Gidon Carmi; Birkbeck College, University of London (1961-1987); correspondence with Charles Biederman; his intellectual philosophies; discussions with Niels Bohr about his ideas on cosmology; integration of quantum mechanics and relativity; discussions with Krishnamurti; and the importance of dialogue in science
Francis Crick personal papers by Francis Crick( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Personal papers of Francis Harry Compton Crick, neuroscientist and Nobel Prize winner who co-discovered the helical structure of DNA with James D. Watson. These Papers document the personal life of a noted biochemist and provide a glimpse of his social life and relationships with family, friends, and colleagues. Largely a collection of correspondence, the papers document Crick's family, social and personal life from 1938 until his death in 2004 and include letters from friends and professional colleagues, family members, social acquaintances, and organizations. Important correspondents include George Gamow, Georg Kreisel, Michael McClure, Leslie Orgel, Linus Pauling, Max Perutz, James D. Watson, and Maurice H.F. Wilkins. The papers also contain also contain personal documents, especially certificates and awards; photographs of Crick, his family and friends; several small pocket notebooks and numerous appointment books (1946-2004); passports, writings of Crick and others; film and television projects, miscellaneous certificates and awards; and collected memorabilia including announcements and invitations, poems, portraits, newspaper clippings, receipts, wine lists, menus from events, and programs from scientific and theatrical events. Also contains condolence correspondence and materials related to Odile Crick. Addition to the Francis Crick Personal Papers materials include correspondence, clippings and tear sheets, photographs, awards, and posthumous materials -- including condolences to Odile Crick regarding Francis' death. The 2012 addition to the papers includes correspondence, writings, notes, photographs, and audiovisual materials. The second 2012 addition includes articles written about Crick including newspaper and magazine clippings, print outs of online articles, and a biography draft by Matt Ridley. Also included are photographs and posthumous materials for a memorial celebration
Determination of the helical configuration of ribonucleic acid molecules by Maurice Wilkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1953 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A reflecting microscope of 1:3 numerical aperture by Keith Patrick Norris( Book )

1 edition published in 1950 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The story that has no end by Chris Sansom( )

1 edition published in 1900 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Double helix the DNA years( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Introduced by science historian Evelyn Fox Keller, the film begins with a clip from 'The Cambridge Story' (1953?), showing Francis Crick and James Watson, two of the scientists responsible for the discovery of the structure of DNA. The film continues with many other archive clips which include Maurice Wilkins explaining his difficulties in working with Rosalind Franklin and, in another clip, demonstrating x-ray crystallography. These are linked by a voice-over narrative and comments from scientists Richard Dawkins, Lewis Wolpert, Steve Jones, Psychologist Stephen Pinker and neurobiologist Kenan Malik. The programme then traces the change in ideas about genetic superiority that was brought about by the work of anthropologist Margaret Meade. While greater understanding of DNA increased comprehension of what it is to be human, her fieldwork in Samoa and Papua New Guinea promoted the idea that humanity was capable of many varieties of culture, equally valid. The importance attached to a biological past gave way to acceptance of the importance of nurture and the appreciation of human possibility
Tobacco mosaic virus crystals and three-dimensional microscopic vision( Book )

1 edition published in 1950 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The prizewinners( Visual )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Stephen Black in extended conversation with Drs Max Perutz and John Kendrew, Nobel Prize-Winners in Chemistry (1962) for their discovery of the molecular structure of haemoglobin and myoglobin, and with Francis Crick, James Watson and Maurice Wilkins, Nobel Laureates in Physiology and Medicine in the same year for their discovery of the molecular structure of deoxyribose nucleix acid (DNA). Also features Sir Lawrence Bragg (1890-1971) talking about the application of x-ray crystallography to molecular biology, and a brilliant short introduction to molecular biology for laymen by the late Professor Michael Swann of Edinburgh University (as he was then). Remarkable for its leisurely but serious approach, absence of hype and for the high intellectual level and clarity of much of the interview material
 
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Audience level: 0.41 (from 0.00 for The prizew ... to 1.00 for Molecular ...)

Alternative Names
Wilkins, M. H. F. 1916-2004

Wilkins, Maurice Hugh Frederick 1916-2004

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The autobiography of Maurice WilkinsSecret of photo 51