WorldCat Identities

Wilkins, Maurice 1916-2004

Overview
Works: 38 works in 78 publications in 3 languages and 2,414 library holdings
Genres: Biography  History  Documentary television programs  Documentary films  Popular works  Science films  Nonfiction films  Interviews  Motion pictures  Science television programs 
Roles: Author, Interviewee
Classifications: QH506, 572.8092
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Maurice Wilkins
DNA( Visual )

7 editions published between 2003 and 2008 in English and held by 90 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A half-century ago, three teams with three different approaches raced to unravel the structure of DNA. This program blends interviews and commentary with extraordinary graphics to tell the story of how the unlikely duo of Jim Watson and Francis Crick won that race. Many of the principal figures in the quest discuss their frustrations and insights including Watson and Crick, Maurice Wilkins and Linus Pauling's son, Peter
The third man of the double helix : the autobiography of Maurice Wilkins by Maurice Wilkins( Book )

11 editions published between 2003 and 2010 in English and Japanese and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Francis Crick and Jim Watson are well known for their discovery of the structure of DNA in Cambridge in 1953. But they shared the Nobel Prize for their discovery of the Double Helix with a third man, Maurice Wilkins, a diffident physicist who did not enjoy the limelight. He and his team at King's College London had painstakingly measured the angles, bonds, and orientations of the DNA structure - data that inspired Crick and Watson's celebrated model - and they then spent many years demonstrating that Crick and Watson were right before the Prize was awarded in 1962. Wilkin's career had already embraced another momentous and highly controversial scientific achievement - he had worked during World War II on the atomic bomb project - and he was to face a new controversy in the 1970s when his co-worker at King's, the late Rosalind Franklin, was proclaimed the unsung heroine of the DNA story, and he was accused of exploiting her work." "Now aged 86, Maurice Wilkins marks the fiftieth anniversary of the discovery of the Double Helix by telling, for the first time, his own story of the discovery of the DNA structure and his relationship with Rosalind Franklin. He also describes a life and career spanning many continents, from his idyllic early childhood in New Zealand via the Birmingham suburbs to Cambridge, Berkeley, and London, and recalls his encounters with distinguished scientists including Arthur Eddington, Niels Bohr, and J.D. Bernal. He also reflects on the role of scientists in a world still coping with the Bomb and facing the implications of the gene revolution, and considers, in this intimate history, the successes, problems, and politics of nearly a century of science."--Jacket
Secret of photo 51( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The story of Rosalind Franklin, a scientist whose work was crucial in the discovery of the famous double-helix structure of DNA, but who went without credit for years
The DNA story( Visual )

3 editions published between 1973 and 1978 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Concentrates upon the role of chemistry and physics in finding the structure of DNA; it thereby sets the scene for the rise of molecular biology and its foundation in crystallography and model building. Stresses the pragmatic model building of Crick and Watson and their mistakes. Contrasts their work with the classical crystallography of the Kings' group as well as their embarrassments. Ends with the realization of the correct base pairings to the confirmation of the twin helical structure from Franklin's x-ray pictures of the a and b forms of DNA and thence to the final structure
The autobiography of Maurice Wilkins by Maurice Wilkins( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Maurice Wilkins gives his side of the story behind the discovery of the double helical structure of DNA. He reveals his part in the life of Rosalind Franklin - viewed by many as having been unfairly treated by her male colleagues - and his work in the Manhattan Project and the development of radar
Double helix 50th anniversary collection : the molecular structure of nucleic acids : the classic papers from Nature, 25 April 1953( Book )

3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Molecular structure of nucleic acids : a structure for deoxyribonucleic acid by James D Watson( Book )

1 edition published in 1953 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The prizewinners( Visual )

2 editions published in 1962 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stephen Black in extended conversation with Drs Max Perutz and John Kendrew, Nobel Prize-Winners in Chemistry (1962) for their discovery of the molecular structure of haemoglobin and myoglobin, and with Francis Crick, James Watson and Maurice Wilkins, Nobel Laureates in Physiology and Medicine in the same year for their discovery of the molecular structure of deoxyribose nucleix acid (DNA). Also features Sir Lawrence Bragg (1890-1971) talking about the application of x-ray crystallography to molecular biology, and a brilliant short introduction to molecular biology for laymen by the late Professor Michael Swann of Edinburgh University (as he was then). Remarkable for its leisurely but serious approach, absence of hype and for the high intellectual level and clarity of much of the interview material
Nature : the molecular structure of nucleic acids : the classic papers from Nature, 25 April 1953( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Oral history interview with David Bohm by David Bohm( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This twelve session interview with David Bohm covers his life and career in quantum physics. Topics discussed include: his family background and early influences; his undergraduate studies at Pennsylvania State University (1935-1939); introduction to quantum mechanics; his time at the California Institute of Technology (1939-1940) and his thesis on calculating scattering of light from a nebular gas cloud; University of California, Berkeley (1941-1943); political interests and activity including Marxism, socialism, communism, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (1943-1946); electrostatic focusing, nature of plasma, particle spin; effects of the atomic bombs on science and society; research associate for J. Robert Oppenheimer (1946-1947); superconductivity; Princeton University Institute for Advanced Study (1947-1950); wrote Quantum Theory; structure of elementary particles; meeting of theoretical physicists in the Pocono mountains circa 1948, attended by notable scientists including Julian Schwinger, Victor Weisskopf, Niels Bohr, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Richard Feynman; the end of his career in the United States; plasma and quantum theory research with Eugene Gross and David Pines; quantum theory book included theories of Niels Bohr, Wolfgang Pauli, Werner Heisenberg, Eugene Wigner, Erwin Schrodinger; the Un-American Acitivities Committee; University of Sao Paolo, Brazil (1951); work with Walter Schutzer, Ralph Shiller, Mario Schoenberg; visit to Jeanne-Pierre Vigier in Paris and Eric Burrup in England; lecturer at the Technion (Technical University), Israel (circa 1955-1956); University of Bristol, research associate (1957-1961); visit with Niels Bohr in Copenhagen, 1957; work on electron beams and flux in a magnetic field with Yack Aharonov; work on plasmas and the separation of the individual and collective behavior with Gidon Carmi; Birkbeck College, University of London (1961-1987); correspondence with Charles Biederman; his intellectual philosophies; discussions with Niels Bohr about his ideas on cosmology; integration of quantum mechanics and relativity; discussions with Krishnamurti; and the importance of dialogue in science
Engineering, biophysics and physics at King's College, London : new building by Maurice Wilkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1952 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

DNA the story of life( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This series marks the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the structure of DNA. Scientists engaged in genetic research in the 1950s focused on proteins but at Cambridge University, James Watson and Francis Crick decided to concentrate on DNA. There are film clips and background information on some of the scientists who were then involved in DNA research: James Watson, Francis Crick, Rosalind Franklin (photograph), Maurice Wilkins, Linus Pauling, Raymond Gosling (Rosalind Franklin's assistant) and Erwin Chargaff. The film narrates the well-known story of the rivalry between scientists at King's College, London, and Cambridge. James Watson describes the model-building approach adopted by himself and Francis Crick and Peter Pauling talks about the work of his father, Linus Pauling, who also tried to discover DNA's structure by model-building. Raymond Gosling talks about the difficult working relationship between Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin at King's College and Maurice Wilkins shows the equipment used by Rosalind Franklin to obtain the x-ray photograph of DNA which, unknown to her, helped Crick and Watson to make their world famous discovery
A reflecting microscope of 1:3 numerical aperture by Keith Patrick Norris( Book )

1 edition published in 1950 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The code of life( Visual )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This programme brings together some of the historical footage held in the BBC which was originally broadcast on television or radio and features some of the luminaries who worked on the discovery of DNA and its applications. Many of the scientists speak candidly about their work and rivalries within the field. The BBC recorded Erwin Schrödinger in 1949 musing on biological matters (he was a physicist). He was a contemporary of Einstein (as illustrated by a photograph). Professors Lisa Jardine and Steve Jones, UCL, comment on his impact as a scientist and physicist. His book, 'What is Life?', was also influential in understanding the nature of heredity; noted by Sir Paul Nurse. Schrödinger was based in Dublin and worked at Trinity College; he applied his physics training on entrophy and coding to the big questions in biology such as the 'secret' of life. Both Darwin and Mendel were influential early scientists in this field but their work led to the eugenics movement (a clip from the Wellcome Library/Galton Institute title 'Heredity in Man' is shown). Physicists contemporary to Schrödinger engaged in war work; they worked on weapons research. Maurice Wilkins worked on the atomic bomb in the US; after the war he joined Kings College London working on crystallography. Simple sugars were known to be components of DNA but the relationship between them was not known. Post war, in Cambridge, another ex-weapons designer - Francis Crick - was working in molecular biology. Jardine knew Crick as a child; she recounts how Crick developed a mine which targeted mine-sweepers. James Watson, who received his Phd at 22 arrived at Cambridge and met his scientific collaboraror Crick. Francis and Odile Crick hosted wild parties at Cambridge, as remembered by Jardine. Rosalind Franklin was hired by Wilkins to 'sharpen up' the crystallography photos that the lab at King's had taken. Unfortunately, Franklin arrived at the lab and the working relationship between her and Wilkins was not good. Raymond Gosling was her research assistant and remembers the tension. Both Crick and Watson who were working on the same issue were considered to be 'butterflies' but it emerged that they were very well connected in terms of meeting other scientists in Cambridge - a chance meetng with John Griffiths gave Crick a breakthrough. They caught wind that Linus Pauling was working on the same problem in the US. Watson visited Wilkins in London and had a tense encounter with Franklin. During his meeting with Wilkins, Watson was inadvertantly shown some of the crystallographs and discovered that there were two different A form and B form crystallograph pictures and the second picture was clearly a helix to Watson's eyes. This led to the famous model and the 1953 paper. This was a critical moment in science, although it hardly featured in the public's imagination. The BBC commissioned a programme, 'The Prizewinners' in 1962 after Wilkins, Watson and Crick received the Nobel prize. Franklin never shared in the Nobel prize - she died of ovarian cancer in 1958. South African researcher, Sydney Brenner, came to the UK and worked on the 'coding problem'; how DNA replicated itself. He collaborated with Crick. Fred Sanger pioneered the method of sequencing DNA; he earned a Nobel prize for his work. John Sulston received a Nobel prize for cataloguing every cell in the nemotode; he sequenced every gene (his lack of materialism is amply illustrated by his shabby kitchen) . This became a proof of concept for reading the human genome. He reminisces about the famous 'Bermuda Talks' which scoped the Bermuda Principles. Craig Venter, from the US, broke from the 'gentlemanly' principles of Bermuda. Sulston acelerated the research in the UK so that Venter could not profit from the research and 'patent' any of the genes. Sulston appeared on 'Desert Island Discs' - he confesses to being a bit pleased with his success in achieving this
Tobacco mosaic virus crystals and three-dimensional microscopic vision( Book )

1 edition published in 1950 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The prizewinners( Visual )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Stephen Black in extended conversation with Drs Max Perutz and John Kendrew, Nobel Prize-Winners in Chemistry (1962) for their discovery of the molecular structure of haemoglobin and myoglobin, and with Francis Crick, James Watson and Maurice Wilkins, Nobel Laureates in Physiology and Medicine in the same year for their discovery of the molecular structure of deoxyribose nucleix acid (DNA). Also features Sir Lawrence Bragg (1890-1971) talking about the application of x-ray crystallography to molecular biology, and a brilliant short introduction to molecular biology for laymen by the late Professor Michael Swann of Edinburgh University (as he was then). Remarkable for its leisurely but serious approach, absence of hype and for the high intellectual level and clarity of much of the interview material
Double helix the DNA years( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Introduced by science historian Evelyn Fox Keller, the film begins with a clip from 'The Cambridge Story' (1953?), showing Francis Crick and James Watson, two of the scientists responsible for the discovery of the structure of DNA. The film continues with many other archive clips which include Maurice Wilkins explaining his difficulties in working with Rosalind Franklin and, in another clip, demonstrating x-ray crystallography. These are linked by a voice-over narrative and comments from scientists Richard Dawkins, Lewis Wolpert, Steve Jones, Psychologist Stephen Pinker and neurobiologist Kenan Malik. The programme then traces the change in ideas about genetic superiority that was brought about by the work of anthropologist Margaret Meade. While greater understanding of DNA increased comprehension of what it is to be human, her fieldwork in Samoa and Papua New Guinea promoted the idea that humanity was capable of many varieties of culture, equally valid. The importance attached to a biological past gave way to acceptance of the importance of nurture and the appreciation of human possibility
Interviews conducted by Jack S. Cohen and Franklin H. Portugal for book, A CENTURY OF DNA by Jack S Cohen( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Audio recordings, transcripts, and manuscripts. Interviews with nine scientists (six transcribed) conducted by Cohen and Portugal for their book A CENTURY OF DNA: A HISTORY OF THE DISCOVERY AND THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE GENETIC SUBSTANCE (MIT Press, 1977). They sought to document the course of research which elucidated the chemical structure and biological function of DNA from its discovery in 1869 to the analysis of the genetic code in the early 1960s. Also contains manuscripts of some of the chapters. The longest interviews are with: Aaron Bendich, Erwin Chargaff, Melvin Cohn, Sven Furberg, Rollin Hotchkiss, Robert William Holley, Robert Stuart Tipson, Lord Alexander Roberts Todd, and Maurice Wilkins
Phosphorescence decay laws and electronic processes in solids by Maurice Wilkins( )

1 edition published in 1940 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

DNA the story of life( Visual )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This series marks the 60th anniversary of the discovery of the structure of DNA. Scientists engaged in genetic research in the 1950s focused on proteins but at Cambridge University, James Watson and Francis Crick decided to concentrate on DNA. There are film clips and background information on some of the scientists who were then involved in DNA research: James Watson, Francis Crick, Rosalind Franklin (photograph), Maurice Wilkins, Linus Pauling, Raymond Gosling (Rosalind Franklin's assistant) and Erwin Chargaff. The film narrates the well-known story of the rivalry between scientists at King's College, London, and Cambridge. James Watson describes the model-building approach adopted by himself and Francis Crick and Peter Pauling talks about the work of his father, Linus Pauling, who also tried to discover DNA's structure by model-building. Raymond Gosling talks about the difficult working relationship between Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin at King's College and Maurice Wilkins shows the equipment used by Rosalind Franklin to obtain the x-ray photograph of DNA which, unknown to her, helped Crick and Watson to make their world famous discovery
 
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WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
The third man of the double helix : the autobiography of Maurice WilkinsThe autobiography of Maurice Wilkins
Alternative Names
Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins

Maurice Wilkins biochemik brytyjski, noblista

Maurice Wilkins biologo neozelandese

Maurice Wilkins neuseeländischer Physiker und Mitentdecker der Molekularstruktur der DNA, Nobelpreis für Medizin

Maurice Wilkins Nieuw-Zeelands natuurkundige

Mauritius Wilkins

Moris Vilkins

Moriss Vilkinss

Uilkins Moris Xyu Frederik

Wilkins, M. H. F. 1916-2004

Wilkins, Maurice Hugh Frederick 1916-2004

Марыс Уілкінс

Морис Вилкинс

Морис Уилкинс

Моріс Вілкінс

Уилкинс, Морис

Մորիս Ուիլկինս

מוריס וילקינס

مائورس ولکنز

موريس ويلكنز

موریس ویلکینز فیزیک‌دان و زیست‌شناس نیوزلندی

میورس ولیکنس

मारीस् एच् विल्किन्स्

মরিস উইলকিন্স

มอริส วิลคินส์

მორის უილკინსი

모리스 윌킨스

ウィルキンズ, モーリス

モーリス・ウィルキンス

莫里斯·威爾金斯

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Secret of photo 51The autobiography of Maurice Wilkins