WorldCat Identities

Frisk, Daniel

Overview
Works: 14 works in 21 publications in 1 language and 1,665 library holdings
Genres: Rules 
Classifications: U818, 355.8
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Daniel Frisk Publications about Daniel Frisk
Publications by  Daniel Frisk Publications by Daniel Frisk
Most widely held works by Daniel Frisk
An analysis of the Army's Arsenal Support Program Initiative by Daniel Frisk ( Book )
2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 608 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The Congress created the Arsenal Support Program Initiative (ASPI) to help maintain the functional capabilities of the Army's three manufacturing arsenals, which are located in Rock Island, Illinois, Watervliet, New York, and Pine Bluff, Arkansas. A primary goal of the program is to enable commercial firms to lease vacant space at the arsenals once that space has been renovated, thereby encouraging collaboration between the Army and commercial firms as well as reducing the costs the government incurs to operate and maintain the arsenal facilities. Since the ASPI's inception, a number of commercial tenants have leased unused property at the arsenals; however, the financial benefits that the program has generated for the government have proved to be small relative to the program's funding. In response to a directive from the Congress, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) conducted a 'business case' analysis of the ASPI, examining the program's costs, return on investment, and economic impact. In keeping with CBO's mandate to provide objective, nonpartisan analysis, this report makes no recommendations."--Preface
Contractor's support of U.S. operations in Iraq by Daniel Frisk ( )
2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 273 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Contractors play a substantial role in supporting the United States' current military, reconstruction, and diplomatic operations in Iraq. That support has raised questions regarding the costs, quantities, functions, and legal status of contractor personnel working in the Iraq theater. This Congressional Budget Office (CBO) paper, which was prepared at the request of the Senate Committee on the Budget, examines the use of contractors in the Iraq theater from 2003 through 2007. It provides an overview of the federal government's costs of employing contractors in Iraq and in nearby countries, the type of products and services they provide, the number of personnel working on those contracts, comparisons of past and present use of contractors during U.S. military operations, and the use of contractors to provide security. CBO also investigated the command-and-control structure between the U.S. government and contract employees and the legal issues surrounding contractor personnel working in Iraq."--Pref
Models used by the military services to develop budgets for activities associated with operational readiness by Adebayo Adedeji ( )
2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 261 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Comparing working-capital funding and mission funding for naval shipyards, an interim report by Daniel Frisk ( )
3 editions published between 2005 and 2007 in English and held by 258 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Navy owns and operates four shipyards: the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia; Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine; Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington; and Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. These shipyards maintain, repair, overhaul, and upgrade surface ships and submarines -- a range of services that costs the Navy over $3 billion annually. In recent years, the Navy has changed the mechanism it uses to fund each of the shipyards, shifting from the Navy Working Capital Fund (NWCF) to direct appropriations. Previously, under the NWCF's revolving-fund approach, the shipyards set prices for maintenance and repair services that were intended to cover their full operating costs, and the Navy's Atlantic and Pacific Fleets as well as its other customers paid for those services out of their appropriated funds. Now, under the direct appropriations approach, the Navy uses a portion of the money appropriated to it by the Congress to fund the shipyards directly, a financing mechanism known as "mission funding." The Navy believes that the shift to mission funding gives it more flexibility in allocating its resources across regions and types of maintenance. But the change has generated some concern, both within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Congress and among outside observers and organizations. Naval shipyards had been operating successfully under some form of revolving-fund financial system since the 1950s; as a result, some analysts have questioned the Navy's rationale for the change. This Congressional Budget Office (CBO) paper -- which was prepared at the request of the Readiness Subcommittee of the House Committee on Armed Services -- outlines the advantages and disadvantages of working-capital funding versus mission funding for financing naval shipyards' operations. It also provides an overview of naval ship maintenance and describes the shipyards' transition from working-capital to mission funding
Comparing working-capital funding and mission funding for naval shipyards by Daniel Frisk ( )
2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 253 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Long-term implications of the 2014 Future Years Defense Program ( Book )
2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"In most years, the Department of Defense (DoD) provides a five-year plan, called the Future Years Defense Program (FYDP), associated with the budget that it submits to the Congress. Because decisions made in the near term can have consequences for the defense budget well beyond that period, CBO regularly examines DoD's FYDP and projects its budgetary impact roughly a decade beyond the period covered by the FYDP. For this analysis, CBO used the FYDP that was provided to the Congress in April 2013; that FYDP spans fiscal years 2014 to 2018, and CBO's projections span the years 2014 to 2028."--
Long-term implications of the 2013 Future Years Defense Program ( Book )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"In most years, the Department of Defense (DoD) provides a five-year plan, called the Future Years Defense Program (FYDP), associated with the budget that it submits to the Congress. Because decisions made in the near term can have consequences for the defense budget well beyond that period, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) regularly examines DoD's FYDP and projects its budgetary impact over several decades. For this analysis, CBO used the FYDP provided to the Congress in March 2012, which covers fiscal years 2013 to 2017; CBO's projections span the years 2013 to 2030. In February 2012, DoD requested appropriations for 2013 totaling almost $615 billion. Of that amount, about $526 billion was to fund the "base" programs that constitute the department's normal activities, such as the development and procurement of weapon systems and the day-to-day operations of the military and civilian workforce. The remaining roughly $88 billion was requested to pay for what are termed overseas contingency operations--the war in Afghanistan and other nonroutine military activities elsewhere.1 The FYDP describes the department's plan for its normal activities and therefore generally corresponds to the base budget."--P. [iii]
The Long-Term Implications of Current Defense Plans and Alternatives: Summary Update for Fiscal Year 2006 ( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
What level of budgetary resources might be needed in the long term to execute the Administration's current plans for defense, and what effect on that level would alternative defense plans have? This Congressional Budget Office (CBO) paper addresses those questions. Prepared at the request of the Chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, it updates the resource projections contained in CBO's September 2004 paper The Long-Term Implications of Current Defense Plans: Summary Update for Fiscal Year 2005 to reflect the changes that the Administration has made to its defense plans in preparing the President's budget request for fiscal year 2006. In addition, this paper includes two alternative scenarios that could reduce the level of defense resources required during the 2012-2024 projection period. CBO will also publish supplementary data on its Web site that provide more details about specific programs. In keeping with CBO's mandate to provide impartial analysis, this paper and the supplementary materials make no recommendations
The Potential Costs Resulting from Increased Usage of Military Equipment in Ongoing Operations ( )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The United States has maintained substantial military forces in Iraq and Afghanistan since hostilities began in Iraq in March 2003. As a consequence, many of the hundreds of thousands of pieces of equipment used in operations in Iraq and Afghanistan are in need of replacement or repair. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) attempted to determine the number and types of equipment being used by the military services at higher-than-normal levels in Iraq and Afghanistan and to estimate the potential resource implications of the resulting need to repair or replace significant portions of that equipment. CBO used two methods to estimate the additional cost that would accrue from the increased usage of the services equipment compared with the normal peacetime cost. Those two methods, one a top-down and the other a bottom-up approach, yielded roughly comparable estimates of the annual costs to replace or repair worn equipment. CBO estimates that the cost from wear and tear on equipment resulting from operations in 2005 could be on the order of $8 billion. Some of the problems with worn-out equipment that the services are now just beginning to address are the result of operations in previous years. Thus, in addition to bills for activity in 2005, costs have accrued for repairs and replacements stemming from operations in the second half of 2003 and all of 2004. The services have received funds to cover some of the costs resulting from activity in 2003, 2004, and 2005, but not enough to cover all of the costs. CBO calculates, on the basis of its estimates and funding provided to the services that it can identify in supplemental appropriations enacted in 2003 and 2004, that the services will have a collective backlog of expenses in 2005 of $13 billion to $18 billion resulting from equipment stress and loss. More than half of those costs are attributable to wear on Army equipment, with the Marine Corps and the Air Force accounting for most of the remaining costs
Long-Term Implications of the Fiscal Year 2009 Future Years Defense Program ( Book )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Decisions about national defense that are made today -- whether they involve weapon systems, military compensation, or numbers of personnel -- can have long-lasting effects on the composition of the nation's armed forces and the budgetary resources needed to support them. Over the past six years, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has published a series of reports about its projections of the resources that might be needed over the long term to carry out the Bush Administration's plans as expressed in the Future Years Defense Program (FYDP). The FYDP is prepared by the Department of Defense (DoD) for each fiscal year and submitted to the Congress as part of the President's budget request. This paper, like CBO's previous reports, provides long-term projections (in this case, through 2026) of the costs of DoD's current plans -- that is, the plans contained in the 2009 FYDP, which specifically addresses fiscal years 2009 through 2013. The 2009 FYDP was transmitted in April 2008, and it reflects changes to the department's programs and priorities since February 2007. The 2009 FYDP and CBO's projections of its long-term implications exclude potential future supplemental or emergency appropriations; CBO's projections include additional appropriations that have already been enacted
Long-term implications of current defense plans summary update for fiscal year 2007 ( )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Decisions about national defense that are made today whether they involve weapon systems, military compensation, or numbers of personnel can have long-lasting effects on the composition of U.S. armed forces and the budgetary resources needed to support them. In the past four years, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has published a series of reports projecting the resources that might be needed over the long term to carry out the plans in the Administration's then-current Future Years Defense Program (FYDP). Prepared by the Department of Defense (DoD), the FYDP is submitted to the Congress each fiscal year as part of the President's budget request. This paper, like CBO's previous reports, provides longterm projections (in this case, through 2024) of the potential costs of DoD's current plans that is, those plans contained in the 2007 FYDP, which covers fiscal years 2007 through 2011. The 2007 FYDP reflects changes to the department's programs and priorities since February 2005, including changes to the defense program that the Administration now plans as a result of the 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR). The 2007 FYDP and CBO's projections both exclude potential future supplemental appropriations
Review of Proposed Congressional Budget Exhibits for the Navy's Mission-Funded Shipyards ( )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
To improve shipyard reporting and address concerns about the decreased visibility of the operations and costs of mission-funded shipyards, the Congress asked the Navy to submit a report with proposed budget exhibits that address a number of specific topics. The Navy released its Report on Direct Funding for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Report on Proposed Congressional Budget Exhibits for Navy Mission-Funded Shipyards in March 2006. The exhibits in that report contain information about shipyards' funding, performance, workload, workforce, and infrastructure. The Congress also requested that the Director of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) submit a review of the Navy's proposed budget exhibits. Generally speaking, the Navy's proposed budget exhibits for mission-funded shipyards address the matters specified in the Congressional request and are consistent with CBO s template for reporting. The exhibits improve on current reporting to the Congress by including: Information about all mission-funded shipyards; Separate information for each mission-funded shipyard; and Clearly defined sections and data covering all of the major aspects of operations at mission-funded shipyards. The Navy s proposed exhibits lack some useful information, however. For example, they show only one year of historical data. Including additional years would more clearly reveal any long-term patterns in shipyards operations and performance as well as any effects of the transition to mission funding. (CBO's template provided for five years of historical data.) The Navy s proposed exhibits also combine data for intermediate-level maintenance facilities and shipyards that were merged as a result of the Navy's Regional Maintenance Plan. Separating out data for the two types of facilities would make the performance of shipyards easier to identify, although it would add to the length and complexity of the report
The Long-Term Implications of Current Defense Plans: Summary Update for Fiscal Year 2005 ( )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
What level of resources might be needed in the long term to execute the Bush Administration's current plans for defense? This Congressional Budget Office (CBO) paper -- prepared at the request of the Chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, addresses that question. It updates the resource projections contained in CBO's July 2003 paper "The Long-Term Implications of Current Defense Plans: Summary Update for Fiscal Year 2004" to reflect the changes that the Administration made to its defense plans in preparing the President's budget request for fiscal year 2005. As a supplement to this paper, CBO also has published an updated briefing on its Web site (www.cbo.gov) that provides more details about specific programs. In keeping with CBO's mandate to provide impartial analysis, this paper and the supplemental briefing make no recommendations
Contractors' Support of U.S. Operations in Iraq ( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Contractors play a substantial role in supporting the United States' current military, reconstruction, and diplomatic operations in Iraq, accounting for a significant portion of the manpower and spending for those activities. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO), at the request of the Senate Committee on the Budget, has studied the use of contractors in the Iraq theater to support U.S. activities in Iraq. This paper, which covers the period from 2003 through 2007, provides an overview of the federal costs of employing contractors in Iraq and in nearby countries, the type of products and services they provide, the number of personnel working on those contracts, comparisons of past and present use of contractors during U.S. military operations, and the use of contractors to provide security. CBO also examined the command-and-control structure between the U.S. Government and contract employees and the legal issues surrounding contractor personnel in Iraq. For this study, the Congressional Budget Office considers the following countries to be part of the Iraq theater: Iraq, Bahrain, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. CBO found that in-theater contracts to support operations in Iraq were almost entirely performed in those countries, all of which are located within the U.S. Central Command's area of operations
 
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English (21)