WorldCat Identities

Taglioni, Daria

Overview
Works: 28 works in 76 publications in 2 languages and 315 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: H11, 332.494
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Daria Taglioni
Gravity for dummies and dummies for gravity equations by Richard E Baldwin( )
17 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This paper provides a minimalist derivation of the gravity equation and uses it to identify three common errors in the literature, what we call the gold, silver and bronze medal errors. The paper provides estimates of the size of the biases taking the currency union trade effect as an example. We generalize Anderson-Van Wincoop's multilateral trade resistance factor (which only works with cross section data) to allow for panel data and then show that it can be dealt with using time-varying country dummies with omitted determinants of bilateral trade being dealt with by time-invariant pair dummies
Gravity chains by Richard E Baldwin( )
8 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Trade is measured on a gross sales basis while GDP is measured on a net sales basis, i.e. value added. The rapid internationalisation of production in the last two decades has meant that gross trade flows are increasingly unrepresentative of the value added flows. This fact has important implications for the estimation of the gravity equation. We present empirical evidence that the standard gravity equation model performs poorly by some measures when it is applied to bilateral flows where parts and components trade is important. It also provides a simple theoretical foundation for a modified gravity equation that is suited to explaining trade where international supply chains are important. Future drafts shall explore ways the model can be implemented empirically
Services Trade Liberalisation Identifying Opportunities and Gains by Julia Nielson( )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study has two components: identification of concrete examples of services exports by developing countries, and quantitative studies on the gains from services liberalisation. While the study is by no means comprehensive, and is subject to many limitations, two fundamental findings emerge. The first of these findings, documented in Part I of the study, is that there is clear evidence that developing countries have important service sector export interests beyond mode 4 (temporary movement of services supplying personnel), being global or regional players in sectors such as business services (out-sourcing), port and shipping services, audiovisual services, telecommunications, construction services and health services. The second of these findings, documented in Part II of the study, is that for most countries, including many developing countries, export-related gains from services liberalisation are neither the only nor the largest basis of expected gains. A large portion of benefits from services liberalisation derive, not from seeking better market access abroad, but from the increased competitiveness and efficiency of the domestic market. Together, the study's two findings underscore the potential benefits of services liberalisation, both for developed and for developing countries
The impact of monetary union on trade prices by Bob Anderton( Book )
4 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Trade effects of the euro evidence from sectoral data ( )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Innocent Bystanders How Foreign Uncertainty Shocks Harm Exporters by Daria Taglioni( Book )
3 editions published in 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The failure of trade economists to anticipate the extreme drop in trade post Lehman Brothers bankruptcy suggests that the behavior of trade in exceptional circumstances may still be poorly understood. This paper explores whether uncertainty shocks have explanatory power for movements in trade. VAR estimations on United States data suggest that domestic uncertainty is a strong predictor of movements in imports, but has little effect on exports. Guided by these results, the paper estimates a bilateral model with focus on the impact of importer uncertainty on foreign suppliers. It finds that there is a strong negative relationship between uncertainty and trade and that this relationship is non-linear. Uncertainty matters most when its levels are exceptionally high. The paper does not find evidence of learning from past turmoils, suggesting that prior experience with major uncertainty shocks does not reduce the effect on trade. In line with the expectations, the negative effect of uncertainty shocks on trade is higher for trade relationships more intensive in durable goods. Surprisingly, however, the effect of durability is non-linear. Supply chain considerations or the possibility that the relationships with the highest durability lead to important compositional effects may have a bearing on the results. The results are robust to excluding the post Lehman shock, suggesting that the trade response during the 2008-2009 crisis has been similar to past uncertainty events
Trade effects of the Euro : evidence from sectoral data by Richard E Baldwin( Book )
4 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Determinants of Export Growth at the Extensive and Intensive Margins Evidence from Product and Firm-Level Data for Pakistan by José Guilherme Almeida dos Reis( Book )
3 editions published in 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
As globalization progresses and investment is mobile, it is ever more important for policy makers to understand drivers of growth and exports at the micro-level: Which products are being produced and exported? Which firms populate the domestic economy? Are they successful in exporting? How are firms affected by exogenous shocks and policy intervention? Through the use of descriptive statistics and econometric analysis, this paper assesses the trade competitiveness of Pakistan using micro-data. The case of Pakistan is interesting since the country's recent trade policy has reverted to a protectionist path since the mid-2000s and trade performance is stagnating, as indicated by a decrease in its trade-to-gross domestic product ratio over the past decade and low levels of sophistication of exports. The main findings of the paper are the following. Like many other countries, Pakistan posts a high concentration of exports in the hands of a limited number of large exporters. The dominance of few exporters has increased over time and it seems associated with the changes in trade policy. Low rates of product innovation and experimentation and a low ability of the Pakistani export sector to enter into new higher growth sectors are other features emerging from the data. All in all, the mediocre performance seems to be associated with internal problems with trade-related incentives, business environment, and governance, in addition to the well-known external constraints
Exporter dynamics, firm size and growth, and partial year effects by Andrew B Bernard( )
3 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Two otherwise identical firms that enter the same market in different months, one in January and one in December, will report dramatically different annual sales for the first calendar year of operations. This partial year effect in annual data leads to downward biased observations of the level of activity upon entry and upward biased growth rates between the year of entry and the following year. This paper examines the implications of partial year effects using Peruvian export data. The partial year bias is very large: the average level of first-year exports of new exporters is understated by 65 percent and the average growth rate between the first and second year of exporting is overstated by 112 percentage points. This paper re-examines a number of stylized facts about firm size and growth that have motivated rapidly expanding theoretical and empirical literatures on firm export dynamics. Correcting the partial year effect eliminates unusually high growth rates in the first year of exporting, raises initial export levels, and shifts 10 percent of market entrants from below to above the median size. Revisiting an older set of facts on firm size and growth, the paper finds that correcting for partial year biases reduces the number of small firms in the firm size distribution and weakens the negative relationship between firm growth and firm size
The Internationalisation of Production, International Outsourcing and Employment in the OECD by Margit Molnár( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This paper reviews some of the possible changes that may occur in the national labour markets of many OECD countries as a result of international trade and the internationalisation of production by multinational companies, with a particular focus on the impact of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) from OECD countries on employment in the home country of the investing firms. Existing studies suggest that the overall impact of trade and the internationalisation of production on aggregate labour market outcomes has been comparatively small, although particular skill and occupational groups have been affected more strongly. The empirical findings in the paper suggest that the aggregate employment impact of outward FDI varies across industries and countries. For manufacturing industries with strong commercial links with the non-OECD economies, there is evidence that domestic employment has become more sensitive to movements in domestic labour costs. At the country level, the growth of outward investment is found to have a significant positive effect on domestic employment growth in the United States. In contrast, there is a negative association in Japan, especially from outward investment in China
Deeper, wider and more competitive? : monetary integration, Eastern enlargement and competitiveness in the European Union by Gianmarco I. P Ottaviano( Book )
4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
What determines a country's ability to compete in international markets? What fosters the global competitiveness of its firms? And in the European context, havekey elements of the EU strategy such as EMU and enlargement helped or hindered domestic firms' competitiveness in local and global markets?. We address these questions by calibrating and simulating a conceptual framework that, based on Melitz and Ottaviano (2005), predicts that tougher and more transparent international competition drives less productive firms out the market, thereby increasing average productivity as well as reducing average prices and mark-ups. The model also predicts a parallel reduction of price dispersion within sectors. Our conceptual framework allows us to disentangle the effects of technology and freeness of entry from those of accessibility (i.e. the ease for local firms to reach local and foreign consumers). On the one hand, by controlling for the impact of trade frictions, we are able to constructan index of "revealed competitiveness", which would drive the relative performance of countries in an ideal world in which all faced the same barriers to international transactions. On the other hand, by focusing on the role of accessibility while keeping "revealed competitiveness" as given, we are able to evaluate the impacts of EMU and enlargement on the competitiveness of European firms. We find that EMU positively affects the competitiveness of firms located in participating economies. Enlargementhas, instead, two contrasting effects. It improves the accessibility of EU members butit also increases substantially the relative importance of unproductive competitors from Eastern Europe
In the Wake of the Global Crisis Evidence from a New Quarterly Database of Export Competitiveness by Guillaume Gaulier( )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Over the past two decades, international trade has become a privileged engine of growth for much of the developing world. With the global economy evolving continuously and rapidly, countries must pay close attention to their positioning on the map of global trade and production. Within this framework, countries must also become aware of how they fare relative to competitors and to their past export performance. Of particular importance is the extent to which their performance is driven by exporter own supply-side capacity as opposed to external or compositional factors, including product and geographical specialization and how these trends compare across countries. This paper describes a new initiative that uses quarterly data for 2005q1-2013q1 to compute comparable indicators of export performance for 228 countries and territories. The database, the Export Competitiveness Database, reveals interesting patterns in trade performance. Export performance, stripped of compositional effects, was strongest for countries from the Asia and Pacific region, on average. Moreover, such performance was almost entirely driven by exporting country specific factors, with changes reflecting growth in volume rather than price developments. All emerging and developing regions have, on average, improved export performance. The indicators in the database trace the legacy of supply-side capacity and the overall export performance of the double-dip recession in the euro area. An illustrative set of results suggests that the paper's measure of competitiveness correlates to a country's nominal and real effective exchange rate, factors that are commonly perceived as important determinants of competitiveness
Globalisation and employment in the OECD by Margit Molnár( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This article reviews some of the possible changes that may occur in the national labour markets of many OECD countries as a result of the internationalisation of production by multinational companies, with a particular focus on the impact of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) from OECD countries on employment in the home country of the investing firms. Existing studies suggest that the overall impact of trade and the internationalisation of production on aggregate labour market outcomes has been comparatively small, although particular skill and occupational groups have been affected more strongly. The empirical findings in the paper suggest that the aggregate employment impact of outward FDI varies across industries and countries. For manufacturing industries with strong commercial links with the non-OECD economies, there is evidence that domestic employment has become more sensitive to movements in domestic labour costs. At the country level, the growth of outward investment is found to have a significant positive effect on domestic employment growth in the United States. In contrast, there is a negative association in Japan, especially from outward investment in China
The Internationalisation of Production, International Outsourcing and Employment in the OECD by Margit Molnar( Book )
5 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This paper reviews some of the possible changes that may occur in the national labour markets of many OECD countries as a result of international trade and the internationalisation of production by multinational companies, with a particular focus on the impact of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) from OECD countries on employment in the home country of the investing firms. Existing studies suggest that the overall impact of trade and the internationalisation of production on aggregate labour market outcomes has been comparatively small, although particular skill and occupational groups have been affected more strongly. The empirical findings in the paper suggest that the aggregate employment impact of outward FDI varies across industries and countries. For manufacturing industries with strong commercial links with the non-OECD economies, there is evidence that domestic employment has become more sensitive to movements in domestic labour costs. At the country level, the growth of outward investment is found to have a significant positive effect on domestic employment growth in the United States. In contrast, there is a negative association in Japan, especially from outward investment in China
Monetary union, exchange rate variability and trade by Daria Taglioni( Book )
3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This thesis starts with an overview of the costs, for trade flows, of crossing borders (a.k.a. border effect) and an assessment of the importance of volatile exchange rates as an impediment to trade. Second, it estimates the impact of EMU and exchange rate uncertainty on trade volumes and formulates regularities on the trade effects, of exchange rate regime changes. Finally, it turns to the effect of monetary union and exchange rate variability on the international transmission of price shocks via the imported/exported inflation channel. Two findings emerge as fundamental: first, exchange rate volatility has a negative impact on trade. Moreover, the effect appears to be nonlinear, and monetary union seems to affect trade volumes and prices even when controlling for exchange rate volatility. Second, sector-specific estimates of the trade effects of both exchange rate volatility and monetary union show a rough correlation between the size of the effects and sectors marked by imperfect competition and increasing returns, more than trade in competitive sectors
Firms and the global crisis : French exports in the turmoil ( )
2 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Global trade contracted quickly and severely during the global crisis. This paper, using a unique dataset of French firms, matching together export data with firm-level credit constraints, shows that most of the 2008-2009 trade collapse is accounted by the unprecedented demand shock and by product characteristics. While all firms have been evenly affected by the crisis, large firms did so mainly through the intensive margin and by reducing the portfolio of products offered in each destination served. Smaller exporters instead have been forced to reduce the range of destinations served or to stop exporting altogether. Credit constraints, on their part, emerged as an aggravating factor for firms active in sectors of high financial dependence. Nonetheless, as the share of creditconstrained firms is small and their number did not increase much during the crisis, the overall impact of credit constraints on trade remains limited. - Financial crisis ; credit constraints ; international trade ; firms' heterogeneity ; intensive and extensive margins
Libéralisation des échanges de services Identification des possibilités et des avantages by Julia Nielson( )
1 edition published in 2004 in French and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Cette étude comporte deux volets : l'identification d'exemples concrets d'exportations de services par les pays en développement, et des études quantitatives sur les avantages de la libéralisation. Loin d'être exhaustive, elle est limitée à bien des égards, mais l'on peut néanmoins en dégager deux conclusions essentielles. Tout d'abord, comme l'illustre la première partie de l'étude, il apparaît clairement que le secteur des services présente pour les pays en développement un très grand intérêt du point de vue des exportations par-delà le mode 4 (mouvements temporaires de personnes physiques fournissant des services), dans la mesure où ces pays sont des acteurs mondiaux ou régionaux dans des secteurs comme les services aux entreprises (externalisation), les services portuaires et services de transport maritime, les services audiovisuels, les services de télécommunications, les services de construction et les services de santé. Deuxièmement, comme on le voit dans la seconde partie de l'étude, pour la plupart des pays dont beaucoup de pays en développement, les gains liés aux exportations résultant de la libéralisation du marché ne sont ni la seule ni la plus importante source de gains attendus. Les avantages de la libéralisation des services découlent, pour une bonne part, non de la recherche d'un meilleur accès aux marchés à l'étranger mais de l'accroissement de la compétitivité et de l'efficience du marché intérieur. Ensemble, les deux observations de cette étude mettent en évidence les avantages potentiels de la libéralisation du marché des services tant pour les pays développés que pour les pays en développement
EMU and competition by Gianmarco I. P Ottaviano( )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Much attention has been paid to the impact of a single currency on actual trade volumes. Lower trade costs, however, matter over and beyond their effects on trade flows: as less productive firms are forced out of business by the tougher competitive conditions of international markets, economic integration fosters lower prices and higher average productivity. We assess the quantitative relevance of these effects calibrating a general equilibrium model using country, sector and firm-level empirical observations. The euro turns out to have increased the overall competitiveness of Eurozone firms, and the effects differ along interesting dimensions: they tend to be stronger for countries which are smaller or with better access to foreign markets, and for firms which specialize in sectors where international competition is fiercer and barriers to entry lower."--Editor
Study on the impact of the euro on trade and foreign direct investment by Richard E Baldwin( Book )
2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The introduction of the euro was the world's largest economic 'experiment.' This experiment opens the door to a major advance in our understanding of how a common currency affects economic activity. When it comes to the euro's trade effects the first contribution of this report is to refine 'the number'. Using the latest data and best empirical methodology, we confirm the received wisdom that the euro has promoted trade significantly, with the aggregate impact being in the range of 5% or so. The second main contribution of this report was to advance and refine our understanding of exact how the euro was boosting trade. The euro boosted trade inside the Eurozone since it lowered the relative price of traded goods coming from the Eurozone. The second main channel is the newly-trade goods channel. The third main contribution of the report concerns the euro's pro-FDI effects."--Publication information p
The impact of monetary union on trade prices ( )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
 
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English (64)
French (1)