WorldCat Identities

Yesso, Don

Overview
Works: 24 works in 26 publications in 1 language and 567 library holdings
Genres: Drama  Juvenile works  Farces 
Classifications: PN1997, 791.4372
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Don Yesso
Mickey by John Grisham( Visual )
3 editions published between 2001 and 2007 in English and held by 544 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
When widowed attorney Tripp Spence finds himself wanted by the IRS, he and his young pitching sensation son, Derrick, change their appearance, assume new identities and flee to Las Vegas. Here Derrick becomes "Mickey" and Tripp enrolls him in a second final year of Little League. But as the nation, the government, and a nervous Tripp watch, "Mickey" leads his team from the city championship all the way to the controversial final game of the Little League World Series. But success comes in second place when compared to the pain and cost of their dishonest choices
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The members of the Drivers Club abscond with the corpse of their recently deceased fellow member Ed Chambers which formerly resided in Mrs. Bertha Griffin-Lamour's funeral home. They bring the corpse to the bar of the Chez Louisiane so he can have one more night on the town. They drink a toast to Hannah for having done a fine job of embalming Ed. The corpse is being temporarily stored in the restaurant freezer when it is discovered by Shorty, who informs Big Arthur, who informs Frank, all intercut with Hannah being informed and then informing her mother; all agree that it would be disastrous to notify the police. Next, D. Wayne Thomas, the Health Dept. inspector ("actually Sanitarian Services"), arrives to do an inspection of the restaurant. A farce ensues as the corpse is whisked from place to place in the restaurant to escape the eyes of the health inspector, finally ending up in the back seat of the health inspector's car as he drives away. Bertha persuades Ed's family to have a closed casket funeral, since only Communists have open casket funerals. As a fellow-Driver, Frank is coerced into aiding the Drivers Club members in escorting Ed's body to the funeral services. The preacher delivers a rousing call and response funeral service, the audience files out leaving no one but Ed behind, and then, to Bertha's horror, Ed's wife asks for a moment alone with her husband. Mrs. Chambers is in the for the double shock of finding an empty casket and then finding her husband sitting in the back of the room
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
When Cyrus, the chef at Cafe Étoile, comes to eat at Chez Louisiane, and then takes his left-overs home in a doggy bag, Big Arthur, the Chez Louisiane chef, grabs the doggy bag back and accuses Cyrus of stealing his recipes. Cyrus challenges him to a boxing match, with the loser required to make a public apology. The business at Frank's bar picks up considerably as all the bookies in town come to set their odds and lay bets on the fight. Reverend Deal enthusiastically takes charge of managing the event, selling ringside seats for $110 with half the proceeds to go to the Boys Club of Greater New Orleans. He arranges for Morris Goldblatt, Yiddish-accented owner of a kosher deli, to be the referee. The fight goes on and in the third round the judges decide it is a draw, but the two fighters refuse to stop fighting. Frank tries to intervene and is K.O.ed. Finally Big Arthur manages to knock out Cyrus. He announces that he was the first chef in New Orleans to put vanilla in his bread pudding and that the étoufée recipe at the Cafe Étoile is his recipe; Cyrus is forced to admit that this is true
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
All the unmarried women in town are thronging the restaurant intent on ensnaring Frank in matrimony, but waitress Anna May complains that they are all bad tippers. The wife of a powerful minister wants Frank for her sexually repressed daughter, Miriam-Margaret. To fend Miriam-Margaret off, Frank cries, "I'm an evolutionist!" Frank is more interested in Ruby, the beautiful new waitress he has hired, despite the fact that she has no experience and won't work nights. However, when Ruby's angry husband shows up looking for her and spoiling for a fight, Anna May saves Frank by giving him a kiss and announcing that she has fired Ruby and Ruby has gone to Memphis
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
William Holmes Varden, who, with his wife Olive, has been coming to the Chez Louisiane for years, drives off a bridge in the rain while intoxicated, and the family retains lawyer Jan Rudy, who was raised by Olive, to sue the restaurant on the grounds that they let him leave the premises and drive while intoxicated. Unfortunately, the restaurant does not have nearly enough insurance. Bubba advises Frank to let the insurance company lawyer handle the matter, but then he begins to investigate and discovers that William, who worked all his life as an "odd jobs yard man," knew he was dying of lung cancer and had no life insurance to take care of his large family living in the projects of New Orleans, so, figuring that the restaurant's insurance would pay off, staged his own suicide. Bubba appeals to Olive, reminding her, among other things, that whenever somebody got married or buried, the Chez was there, even when people couldn't pay up front, and when the "Civil Rights trouble" began, Ennis always allowed meetings to take place at the Chez, even though "two times crackers tried to fire bomb that place." Much of the information he uncovers is given to him by Olive, who is too honest to let the restaurant be closed because "every time we went to the Chez they treated us like ladies and gentlemen." "He shoulda gone to a big hotel downtown and done it, one of them chains." Bubba informs an astonished Frank that "You're not goin' to court, Frank, because at the Chez everybody gets treated like ladies and gentlemen." Jan assures Bubba that she and her husband will take care of Olive, and invites him to join her firm, but he declines, as he prefers to work alone
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Business is bad, and Bubba suggests that Frank hire a professional restaurant consultant. The consultant tells Frank that he has too many doors for employees to use in stealing from him, that he should cook with more salt to make his customers thirsty (with Frank protesting that black people have high blood pressure), and that he needs to build up his "night business," giving out advertising flyers in tourist hotels, paying cabdrivers to deliver customers, having a parking valet, serving nothing but fried chicken and ribs, and replacing his office with a bandstand and live entertainment. Frank's new bandstand blocks the entrance to the restrooms. Tiger hates the cost control automation at the bar, remarking that "automation undermines the responsibility of the individual." Frank hires a booking agent who promises Bo Diddley but delivers a folk singing group called the Haystackers. Some of the new customers are wives of old customers who thought their husbands were at work, not sitting at the bar drinking. The Haystackers sing Pick a bale of cotton, and Tom Dooley, and are popular only with a set of tourist parents (even their kids hate them) and one transvestite; Frank's regular customers hate them. The parking valet reports that two of the cars were stolen and one was wrecked
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Opens with a sleeping Frank awakened by a cockroach crawling over him. Frank is getting in the way of the staff, demonstrating his ignorance of the restaurant business, and looking for some way to make himself useful. A salesman talks him into buying a huge quantity of lobsters, even though the restaurant freezer is always breaking and the restaurant does not have a fish tank. Finally, to get him out from underfoot, they send him to the French Market to buy produce and beignets. The staff is busy getting ready to cater the party to celebrate Hannah's engagement to the surgeon. When Frank finds out, he tries to cancel the catering contract out of jealousy, but Hannah's mother arrives with papers proving that Frank's father borrowed $10,000 from her with the restaurant as collateral, and Frank not only has to cater the party, but he has to show up himself. It turns out that Hannah's fiancee, Dr. Boysenberry, has a high, squeaky voice. The books on restaurant management that Frank has ordered arrive
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
As the show opens, it is late at night and Frank is in the apartment above the restaurant reading Anne Rice's Interview with a vampire, when he hears noises outside; when he goes outside with a baseball bat and a knife from the kitchen, he encounters a very intelligent and well-spoken homeless veteran who is taking up residence in a refrigerator box in the alley. When Frank calls the police to have him ejected, the bum gets his revenge by standing outside the front door of the restaurant begging and loudly singing The banana boat song. Eventually Frank's business drops off 20%. Kindness fails. Bribery fails. The law fails (when Bubba confronts the bum with city ordinances violated, the bum points out that he is a purveyor of magazines and his free speech is protected by the Constitution and the ACLU). Threats of violence fail (Big Arthur will not beat him up once he learns he is a veteran). Offering him a job fails. Finally Frank goes out into the alley and tries to find out more about this man, his name, where he came from, etc. "I work hard every day not to have to answer questions like that," is the response. But the next day, the bum is gone. Frank is preoccupied and kind of misses him. At the end of the day, he goes to the bar to get a soda water, where he is greeted by a customer, and then wanders off with his water; suddenly he realizes the customer who greeted him was the bum. When he gets back to the bar, the bum has left without paying his bill
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Ex-Angola State Prison inmate Pokie LaCarre comes to see Frank accompanied by Sweet Solly McCray, who tells Frank that he has sold Frank's father's $26,000 gambling debt to Pokie. Pokie wants a partnership in the restaurant if Frank can't come up with the money by Saturday. When Frank says "You can't be serious," Pokie says, ominously, "I'm the most serious man in New Orleans." Bubba explains to Frank that New Orleans is a gambling town (draw poker was invented on the river and New Orleans was the first place in America in which "you bet" replaced "yes") and traditionally in New Orleans a son pays off his father's debts. Mrs. Bertha Griffin-Lamour gets wind of this and preemptively demands that her $10,000 debt be paid off first (before Pokie's). Hannah pleads with her mother not to demand repayment, then gives Frank the $10,000 herself, with the expectation that he will use it to pay her mother. However, Frank offers it to Pokie, who takes it once he realizes that Big Arthur, the cook, his real objective, refuses to work for him no matter what the conditions. Bertha tells her daughter that Frank told her he did not have the money to pay her back
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Miss Marie accosts a slightly drunk Bubba in the middle of the morning to help her write her will. Meanwhile, Hannah goes to see Father Phil at the Catholic church to ask for advice; the advice is to call off her impending wedding with LaMar Boysenberry because she isn't sexually attracted to him. "Like eating crawfish, there's no pretty way of doin' it." At the bar, Soap Benson regales Shorty, the Reverend and Frank with the latest happenings on the soaps on television. Hannah asks her mother about the marriage to her father, which, it turns out, was a marriage for love which left her a widow without a penny to raise her child, and the marriage to her stepfather, which was a strategic marriage to obtain the funeral home. Anna-May, who was excited to be the only bridesmaid who wasn't a college graduate, and who spent a month's salary on her beautiful blue dress, is devastated. It was "pretty high cotton for me to be in. ... I'm just proud not to be on welfare." As Hannah leaves the restaurant after talking with Anna-May, Frank plays You send me on the jukebox (legendary in New Orleans, and stocked by this father), but Hannah doesn't notice. Miss Marie reassures a worried Bubba "I'm not gonna die, if that's what you think." There have been no signs, she hasn't heard any voices or seen a little white dog. "I can't die until Frank learns the business; the Lord told me so." A relieved Bubba says, "it must be nice to talk to the Lord like that." "Very nice," is the reply
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Bubba, Frank, and Tiger are at the bar as Hurricane Gary is coming in. They are expecting Reverend Deal, who is interviewing for a job as a pastor of a small church. To pass the time, Bubba and Tiger begin to tell Frank a story about Ennis' involvement in another attempt by Reverend Deal to get a church for himself. In a flashback, the board of the church (the Glorious Kingdom Congregation of the Sisters & Brethren of the Lamb) discusses whether or not to hire him; the women are against it and the men are for it, since the men have loaned money to the church for repairs and they will only get it back if they can find a pastor who will pull in a big congregation. His first act as reverend is to bring in a huge gospel choir, so large it outnumbers the congregation. His first sermon concerns a sign he saw in Chicago which said 'Try the Lord, ' with graffiti saying 'on what charges?' 'The Lord is blamed for bad things men do!' Next he conducts a full immersion baptism of a rather large young lady who has never been baptised before because she is afraid of moving water; he nearly drowns when she gets him in a 'death grip.' Next, the male members of the church encounter the reverend drinking at Frank's bar with a beautiful young member of his choir. Finally, he commits 'professional suicide' with his 'Jesus loves me' sermon in which he confesses all of his sins with the refrain 'but the Lord loves me, ' including 'I have attempted unfair pricing in the wholesale wrought iron business, ' 'I have a fake certificate as a preacher, ' 'I went into preaching for power and fame, ' and 'I was arrested in Panama City, Florida.' According to Bubba, Miss Marie considers Reverend Deal to be the most honest person she knows. Finally, the reverend arrives at the bar and remarks that he hopes the hurricane doesn't hit, since he sold a lot of hurricane insurance in the last several years and the company isn't real good about paying off
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Cool, an orphan hired by Frank's father out of the St. Teresa Home for Children, is 21 years old and beginning to chafe at being treated like a child. He is ambitious and wants to be a businessman. While trying to sell musk-scented car cologne after work, he is recruited as a mule by a cocaine-selling gang that works out of a shoeshine business belonging to Mr. Kicks. Meanwhile, Frank is preoccupied with restaurant cost control, which he has learned about from his books and from a correspondence course. He drives Big Arthur and Shorty crazy trying to figure out exactly how much the ingredients of the gumbo cost. Then he orders the staff to sell the gumbo in a 6 oz. bowl instead of an 8 oz. bowl in order to increase the profit. When Miss Marie protests that "that bowl business is wrong. That's trickin' people," Frank refuses to listen. Then he discovers that the staff is giving the gumbo to customers as a "lagniappe," which, his New Orleans dictionary informs him, is "an extra or unexpected free gift." Cool's first task is to deliver some cocaine to three people staying in a hotel. He collects his $3,000 and is offered some cocaine by Homer, the 16-year-old gang member who has recruited him, who drives a red 1956 Cadillac Fleetwood
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Cool was offered some cocaine at the end of the last show, and at the beginning of this one, he tries it. Frank gives Cool his paycheck and tells him to "go buy yourself a yacht." When Frank complains about old worn-out equipment at the restaurant, Tiger quotes William Faulkner, "the past is never dead; in fact it ain't even past." "Course he was an alcoholic white man from Mississippi." As Frank gives Big Arthur and Shorty their checks, he says "Welcome to the only profession that pays less than the teaching profession; I never thought I'd see the day." Cool overhears and looks unhappy. Later Shorty and Tiger encounter Cool in the alley bringing home his new electronic keyboard. Cool snaps at them and won't let them see it. "He musta saved up for it." Cool delivers some more cocaine. The next morning, Frank knocks on Cool's door; he has overslept for the second day in a row and Tiger needs his help. When he gets downstairs, he snaps at Tiger. That evening he goes out drinking with Homer in the red cadillac. The next day, Big Arthur hears him calling a bum in the alley "nigger." "My father-in-law and Richard Pryor can say 'nigger, ' but you can't," is the jist of what Big Arthur says when chewing him out. Miss Marie asks him "What's wrong with you, sugar?" Later, he is playing jazz on his keyboard when Tiger knocks on his door and asks to play with him. Cool plays too fast, but Tiger is patient. That night, Cool tells Homer he can't do this anymore, and Homer whispers he's planning to get out, too. The next day, it is raining, and two little gang kids come to the Chez to tell Cool that Homer and his girlfriend have been shot in their beds. "It's the cost, man. Homer's all paid up now. In a few days, it'll be business as usual." Cool comes in from the rain soaked and asks Frank to forgive him. "Whatever it is, is it over?" Cool nods, and Frank hugs him. A nun at the St. Teresa Home for Children sees money coming through the mail slot
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Four "big shots" from New York, including Mitch Torrence, the chairman of one of the largest corporations in America, arrive at the restaurant in the evening when the cooks are off duty and give Frank $500 to find a cook to make them a great meal. Frank calls Shorty to come in and cook "a masterpiece." While they are all waiting for Shorty to arrive, one of Torrence's lackeys makes a phone call and comes back with the news that Torrence's two partners, Gus Davis and Manny Leeks, have stabbed him in the back and sold his company out from under him. The three lackeys, perceiving that Torrence has lost his power, leave him alone at the restaurant. When Frank comes out to tell him that the cook has arrived and to ask what he wants to eat, he orders a grilled cheese sandwich. Shorty says "Sometimes rich people make me sick," and Frank says, "Someone gives me $500 and he's got me runnin' around like Step 'n' Fetchit. ... He gives me $500 for a sandwich and people are starvin'." Then Mitch comes in the kitchen and compliments Shorty on the sandwich. He begins to tell the staff that the people who buy companies nowadays know nothing about how the companies work; they are just speculators who use junk bonds to buy companies and get rich without adding any value. In 1987, salaries for workers went up 5% but CEO salaries went up 25%. "I made 15 million dollars last year. How much can I eat? ... For all that wealth, what services do I provide my fellow man?" He tells them that his father made chairs that lasted for years. "That's value." But "If I hadn't been there, my old man woulda died alone in some roach hospital run by the city." Shorty says "You don't like your job much, do you?" Mitch asks Frank what could be more rewarding than his job running a restaurant and feeding people, and Frank answers, "Teaching." Then Mitch begins musing about how he could recover his company, remembers that one of the partners is a religious Christian who is probably having an affair with his secretary, and begins to work the phones, with the Chez Louisiane staff looking on, in order to blackmail that partner into screwing the other partner; before the evening ends, he is well on the way to getting revenge on all of the people who stabbed him in the back. "I didn't come up from the streets; I came up from the gutter." Shorty says, "You really seem to be enjoying this, Mitch." Mitch replies that when you look at great cooks or any talented people, "None of the A plus people are doin' it for the money; they're doin' it for love." He thanks them all for "the food and the fellowship," and invites the Reverend on an all-expenses-paid tour of "the belly of the beast" (New York City)
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Frank has tried to return to Boston, but his toilet broke, he had terrible dreams, the laundry lost all his clothes, his car was stolen, any telephone he used would malfunction, his girlfriend of three years left him for a female golfer, and his office and classroom burned down. Obviously, Miss Marie's voodoo has worked. He returns to New Orleans and moves into his father's rooms above the restaurant. Hank Aaron, his father's cat, who disappeared the day his father died, returns. Frank has a dream that the restaurant throws a lavish welcoming party for him, including Don King, Joe Frazier and the mayor of New Orleans. When he wakes up, there is hardly anyone in the restaurant because it is a week night, the night cook, Anna-May's relative, is waiting tables, and Hannah informs him she is engaged to a surgeon
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Shorty comes in to work with a black eye and a story about being mugged by some white guys on his way to his car after work. Tiger muses, "white fellas beating up white fellas in a black neighborhood in the middle of the night? Things are changin'" It turns out that Shorty got his black eye defending the honor of a wild young rich girl being harassed by two men outside a jazz club. He has invited her to live with him in his apartment. Since he never went to college, but went into the Navy right after high school to learn to cook, he worries about how he can get her to stay. He asks Hannah for advice on how to get her to fall in love with him, and on her advice brings home roses, only to find she is gone. Later, she returns with John DeLesseps, a rich boy, in tow, then scares John away with a story about dating someone who was later killed robbing a liquor store. "Won't there be a stir in Hattiesburg when he tells them?" The next day, she comes to the restaurant looking for Shorty so that he can pay a huge cab bill for her, and charms the staff; she tells Miss Marie she reminds her of Aunt Delia who raised her, since her parents were alcoholics. The staff tells her, when she leaves, that she is always welcome. She uses her credit card to buy Shorty a new jacket but then gets ready to leave. "I'm just passin' through. ... If I take you seriously, I'd have to take everything seriously and that would be real life. ... That would be too dangerous."
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Frank Parrish, a rather superstitious college professor from Boston, Massachusetts, visits New Orleans because his father, who deserted him when he was two, has died and left him a restaurant. The employees of the restaurant would like Frank to sell the restaurant to them, but Pokey, the owner of a rival restaurant, would like Frank to sell the restaurant to him for a much higher sum. Frank is tempted by the higher sum, but Miss Marie visits Madame Torchay and puts a voodoo "chain" on Frank so that he will sell the restaurant to the employees and stay in New Orleans. In the course of the show, Frank meets and falls in love with Hannah Griffin, female embalmer and daughter of Mrs. Bertha Griffin-Lamour, funeral home owner and very influential lady
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Frank sells $30,000 worth of his antiques to an antique dealer for $10,000 in order to pay back Hannah for the money she loaned him to help him pay back her mother. It is a cold, wet day near Christmas. Frank asks Bubba to invite him to his mother's house for Shabbat. After the ceremony, "we'll all sit around talkin' about why I'm not married," Bubba says. Tiger introduces Frank to his Uncle Ray, who only visits once a year near Christmas, and doesn't yet know that his older brother, Frank's father, has died. He tells Frank he travels the world without ever stopping anywhere for more than a few months. He also tells Frank how hard he tried to impress his older brother without ever succeeding. At the end of the program, Uncle Ray returns home to his wife and children and his job as a postman in McComb, Mississippi (the world travels were made-up). Bubba's mother tells him he killed his father by not marrying and having children, so Bubba announces that he and Frank are gay lovers; later in the show, it turns out that Bubba's mother, who never found any girls he brought home good enough for him, is now crazy about the last girl he brought home. With Louis Armstrong singing When it's Christmas-time in New Orleans on the track, the staff of the restaurant is seen playing Santa Claus for the neighborhood children. Frank drinks a toast to all of the staff, to his first Christmas in the Big Easy, and to his Uncle Ray
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Tiger interrupts Frank in the midst of a phone call to introduce Sheila Munyo of the Louisiana Film Commission and Andy Gleason of Anston Studios. It seems that they want to pay Frank $8,000 to take over the Chez Louisiane for two days as a filming location. Tiger is hired to play the bartender, and has to be taught the correct southern accent by the director. The director, Arnold David Tuney, is insulting to the actors when they are not present ("The president of the United States is an actor; sleep well tonight") and fawns all over them when they are present (when Brandman, the male lead, makes a mistake, the director blames Tiger for it). It turns out that the script refers to the restaurant as a "sleazy joint." The director micromanages the mixing of the fake blood because "Roman Polanski makes his own blood." Bobby Days, the actor playing the villain and the friendliest member of the cast, tells Bubba that the director cares only about smoke and blood. Neema, the female lead, comes on to Frank and invites him to have lunch the next day in her trailer. Frank is embarrassed but Bubba urges him to go: "This is history. ... It's like gettin' in there with the Statue of Liberty. ... You owe it to movie-goers everywhere." Bobby Days later tells Frank that he cost the crew $400, in a bet Bobby won, because Frank did not meet Neema in her trailer after all. "It's a little game she plays with local yokels. The only thing that happens is lunch." Larry, who has been treated like dirt throughout the shoot, not given a button to identify him as a member of the crew so almost turned away by security, yelled at for blocking the light, etc., turns out to be the writer of the script
Frank's place ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
A consultant who sells fire insurance and also owns half-interest in a company that installs sprinkler systems talks Frank into paying to have a sprinkler system installed in order to lower his fire insurance costs. Ozell Dryer, a guest in the restaurant, asks to meet Frank because he has heard that Frank used to live in Boston; it turns out they are both alumni of Brown University. Ozell invites Frank to be a guest at his club, the Capital C Club. There is a crisis in the kitchen because Big Arthur's favorite knife is missing. He tells Frank he is going to kill the man who took it. Later, Hannah arrives and presents Frank with the knife, which was left behind at the funeral parlor on the occasion of her engagement reception. Frank gives it to Big Arthur and tells him the person who took it was Hannah's fiancee. Frank tells Tiger he has been invited to the Capital C Club and speculates that it might be good for business to join a club. Tiger points out that there are many men's clubs in New Orleans and proceeds to invite Frank to his club, the Coachman's Social Aid and Pleasure Club, nicknamed "the Drivers," founded in 1875 by the first free black carriage driver. At Mardi Gras, they are the Mardi Gras Indians. At the meeting of the Drivers, Reverend Deal is chastised for giving an extremely long blessing. Then the members get down to the serious business of drinking; Frank gets drunk and enjoys the music of the Coachman Club Quartet, which sounds just like the Ink Spots. The next day he has a hangover and has to try Tiger's hangover remedy so he can sober up for his visit to the snooty Capital C Club, founded in 1895 by a French Quarter Creole physician. At Mardi Gras, they dress in white tie and tails. While Frank is gone, the kitchen is flooded because the new sprinkler system has a heat detector over the fryers. When he gets back, Anna-May explains that the Capital C Club is only for light-skinned Creoles with a capital C, while Frank is a darker skinned creole with a small c, according to the paper bag question: which is darker, you or the bag? Frank summons Ozell to his office and tells him he is not going back again. Ozell says he is part of a group that is trying to put an end to skin color discrimination in the club, but Frank declines. "All my life I've been the only black" doing this and that; "I'm not about to be the only black in a black club. That's going a little bit too far, don't you think?" Afterwards, the Grand Driver drops by to present Frank with his bowler hat and collect his $25 dues for the Drivers Club
 
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Audience level: 0.13 (from 0.10 for Mickey ... to 1.00 for Frank's pl ...)
Languages
English (22)