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Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Institute for Advanced Study

Overview
Works: 462 works in 466 publications in 1 language and 466 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings 
Publication Timeline
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Publications about Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Publications about Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Publications by Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Publications by Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Most widely held works by Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
New frontiers in life science ( )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Session C of the IAS Inaugural Symposium "Mapping Frontiers of Science" entitled "New frontiers in science."
The beauty of computing and mathematics by C. L Liu ( )
2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Prof Ronald Graham of UC San Diego, Prof Chung Laung Liu of National Tsing Hua University, Prof Fan Chung of UC San Diego and Prof Roland Chin of HKUST share their inspirations of discovering beauty out of their experience as computing scientists and mathematicians
New paradigms in invariant theory by Roger Howe ( )
2 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Since its beginnings in the early 19th century, invariant theory has provided impetus for advances in algebra, especially commutative algebra. This continues today, especially with the use of toric deformation to understand the structure of rings arising in invariant theory and representation theory. This talk reviews the general notion of toric deformation and some of its applications in invariant theory. Special attention will be given to the class of Hibi rings. These rings have a particularly elegant theory, with strong connections to combinatorics, and they encompass many of the rings that appear in key applications of toric deformation
The changing dynamics of the world [presentation session] by Jim O'Neill ( )
2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Dr O'Neill focuses on the changing dynamics of the world economy and the rapid rise of the importance of the BRIC nations. He suggests that, contrary to much pessimism, their involvement will lead to great global prosperity for all, not just themselves. Talking about the rise of the 'Growth Markets', including the four BRICs and four of the so-called Next 11, Dr O'Neill shares his views on how they will be influencing the world economy this decade. Their combined GDP will increase by about double that of the US and Europe together, and therefore this is the key issue for the world economy, not the US credit rating nor the challenges of EMU
How do bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics? by Robert H Austin ( )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
What drives the emergence of highly resistant strains of bacteria, such as the recent enterohaemorrhagic strain of E. coli O104:H4 that caused many deaths in Europe this spring? Prof Robert Austin tries to outline how bacteria evolves rapidly in terms of general principles of evolution dynamics, why they might become toxic from a game perspective, and some lessons to be learned for the future
Airborne nanoparticles by Richard C Flagan ( )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Airborne nanoparticles have been measured for more than a century, but their chemical and physical nature is only now beginning to be understood. Exposures to nanoparticles (particles with diameters smaller than 100 nm) have been linked to a number of adverse respiratory and cardiovascular health effects. Once thought to be rare, the formation of nanoparticles by homogeneous nucleation of the products of atmospheric photochemical reactions has now been observed in both pristine remote locations, and in polluted urban environments. The key to this growing understanding of these small particle is instrumentation that enables rapid measurement of particle size distributions in the low nanometer size range using the scanning electrical mobility spectrometer (also known as the scanning mobility particle size, SMPS). Originally limited to particles larger than about 10 nm, recent advances have enabled measurements down to 1 nm diameter, and made possible measurements of incipient particles. Using these tools, Prof Flagan and his research group are probing the formation of particles in atmospheric reactions, and examining the role of atmospheric ions in the nucleation process. To enable rigorous study of the health impacts of airborne nanoparticles, they have developed new instrumental approaches that make it possible to miniaturize instruments for nanoparticle measurement and to develop personal nanoparticle exposure monitors. to penetrate into the lower airways, and how similar mechanisms have been identified for allergens associated with fungal spores. He also discusses his and his research group's efforts to develop instrumental methods for measuring both the primary pollen particles and the respirable allergen. He further examines some of the remarkable mechanisms that have evolved to aid pollen dispersal, including the fastest motion yet recorded for any plant or animal
2013 Nobel Laureates in economic sciences : demystifying empirics of asset prices? ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2013 was awarded jointly to Eugene F. Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert J. Shiller "for their empirical analysis of asset prices". Prof Pengfei Wang from the Department of Economics, Prof Jialin Yu and Prof Chu Zhang from the Department of Finance will share with the audience on the work of the Nobel Laureates. Prof Kalok Chan, Acting Dean of the Business School, will be the moderator
How basic research has transformed human health by Paul R Schimmel ( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
From the second genetic code to biologics, Prof. Paul Schimmel from the Scripps Research Institute seeks to obtain new understanding of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and its applications to disease therapies. This is the third lecture by the speaker
Spin seebeck effect in a variety of magnetic systems by S Maekawa ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
When metals and semiconductors are placed in a temperature gradient, the electric voltage is generated. This mechanism to convert heat into electricity, the so-called Seebeck effect, has attracted much attention as the mechanism for utilizing wasted heat energy. Ferromagnetic insulators are good conductors of spin current, i.e., the flow of electron spins. When they are placed in a temperature gradient, generated are spin current and the spin voltage, i.e., spin accumulation. Once the spin voltage is converted into the electric voltage by the inverse spin Hall effect in attached metal films, the electric voltage is obtained from heat energy. This is called the spin Seebeck effect (SSE). Here, the speaker presents the linear-response theory of SSE based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and discuss about SSE in a variety of the magnetic devices
Protein sorting in the secretory pathway lessons from yeast applied to mammalian development by Randy W Schekman ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Prof Randy Schekman's laboratory developed genetic and biochemical approaches to dissect the process of protein secretion in the baker's yeast, S.cerevisiae. The genes and proteins his lab discovered in yeast were found to organize the secretory pathway in all eukaryotes. Part of the pathway has been dissected using biochemical reconstitution of the formation and fusion of transport vesicles that mediate protein traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. His lab has probed the molecular mechanism of defects in protein sorting that lead to human diseases of development such as spina bifida and a disease of craniofacial morphology that results in a tissue-selective defect in the secretion of collagen. Recent results suggest a role for ubiquitin conjugation of a coat protein complex in the envelopment of vesicles that covey collagen from the endoplasmic reticulum
Replacing the transistor searching for the milli-volt switch by Eli Yablonovitch ( )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In contemplating the headlong rush toward miniaturization represented by Moore's Law, it is tempting to think only of the progression toward molecular sized components. There is a second aspect of Moore's Law that is sometimes overlooked. Because of miniaturization, the energy efficiency of information processing steadily improves. We anticipate that the energy required to process a single bit of information will eventually become as tiny as 1 electron volt per function, truly indeed a molecular sized energy. Inevitably, most logic functions including storage, readout, and other logical manipulations, will eventually be that efficient. However there is one information-processing-function that bucks this trend. That is communication, especially over short distances. Our best projections, of improvements in the short distance communication function, show that it will still require hundreds of thousands of electron volts just to move one bit of information the tiny distance of only 10 micrometers. Why this energy per bit discrepancy for communications? It is caused by the difference in voltage scale between the wires and the transistor switches. Transistors are thermally activated, leading to a required voltage >>kT/q. Wires are long, and they have a low impedance, allowing them to operate efficiently even at ~1 millivolt. The challenge then is to replace transistors with a new low-voltage switch that is better matched to the wires. Prof Yablonovitch presents some of the technical options for such a new switch
Energy savings potential of LEDs for energy efficient lighting and future research directions in LEDs by Steven DenBaars ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Lecture 1: LEDs fabricated from gallium nitride have led to the realization of high-efficiency white solid-state lighting. At UCSB's Solid State Lighting and Energy Center Prof DenBaars has fabricated advanced GaN white LEDs structures which exhibit luminous efficacy greater than 170 lm/Watt, and external quantum efficiencies higher than 50%. This has enabled LEDs lighting to compete with traditional lighting technologies such as incandescent and CFL. A review of the energy savings potential of LED based lighting compared to traditional technologies is addressed. The US Department of Energy estimates that in 2030 the energy savings from LED lighting in the US alone would amount to over $250 billion in energy savings, which is equivalent to 50 Gigawatt size power plants. Further improvements in materials quality and cost reduction are necessary for wide-spread adoption of LEDs for lighting. Solid-state lighting has the potential to achieve 85% energy efficiency, corresponding to 255 lm/Watt, and be able to run entirely off sustainable energy sources such as either solar, thermoelectric or wind. Key problems and new research directions in solid state lighting technologies will be highlighted. UCSB research on new crystal orientation shows great promise in achieving high efficiencies at high current densities and lowering the cost of LED lighting
Realizing the Pfaffian quantum hall state with cold atom magic by Tin-Lun Ho ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The Pfaffian quantum Hall state is a p-wave BCS state of composite fermions, and is known to have Majorana fermion excitations. It has a bosonic analog in fast rotating Bose gas. The achievement of bosonic Quantum Hall State is difficult because of the strong competition of Bose-condensation. Here, we show that a natural and practical way to generate the bosonsic Laughlin state, Pfaffian state, and various non-abelian quantum Hall states using is a novel version of "BEC-BCS crossover" captured by some remarkable algebraic identifies
Post-Fisherian experimentation from physical to virtual by Chien-Fu Wu ( )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Experimental design has been a scientific discipline since the founding work of Fisher. During the 80-year history, its development has been largely dominated by work in physical experiments. With advances in high-performance computing and numerical modeling, virtual experiments on a computer have become viable. This talk highlights some major developments (physical and virtual) in this long period. Fisher's principles (replication, randomization, blocking) are reviewed, together with principles (effect hierarchy, sparsity, heredity) for factorial experiments. A fresh look at interactions and effect aliasing is provided, with some surprisingly new insights on an age-old problem. Robust parameter design, another significant development which focuses on variation modeling and reduction, is mentioned. Turning to computer experiments, the key differences with physical experiments are highlighted. These include the lack of replication errors which entails new governing principles other than Fisher's and the use of space-filling designs instead of fractional factorials. There are two strategies for modeling and analysis: based on Gaussian processes or on function approximations. These seemingly conflicting approaches can be better linked by bringing a stochastic structure to the numerical errors. Throughout the talk, real experiments/data, ranging from manufacturing to nano technology, are used for illustration
The secret lives of enzymes by K. Barry Sharpless ( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Prof. Sharpless discusses the secret lives of enzymes and shares his recent research on the topic of click chemistry, a set of powerful and selective reactions for the rapid synthesis of new compounds
Networks that suppress genome instability by Richard Kolodner ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The genome of many cancers is characterized by ongoing genome instability. However, the causes of genome instability in cancer are not well understood. To understand the control genome instability, the speaker and his research group developed three types of genetic assays for measuring the rate of accumulating gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae - one that detects GCRs containing a breakpoint in single copy sequences, a second that detects GCRs mediated by segmental duplications, and a third that detects GCRs mediated by Ty elements which are similar to mammalian LINE elements. Using these assays and a novel genetic screen design, they have identified 188 genes in which defects cause increased GCRs and an additional 325 genes in which mutations only cause increased GCRs when combined with a second mutation thus defining multiple pathways that prevent GCRs. Unexpectedly, they found that there are specific pathways that suppress duplication-mediated GCRs and identified sequences that are hotspots for the formation of GCRs. They are now using the human homologues of the yeast genome instability suppressing genes to examine the genetics of genome instability in human cancers by mining cancer genomics data sets
How structural analysis can actively elucidate mammalian cell function by Xiang-Lei Yang ( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
From the second genetic code to biologics, Prof. Xiang-Lei Yang from the Scripps Research Institute seeks to obtain new understanding of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and its applications to disease therapies. This is the second lecture by the speaker
Topological insulators of bosons by Senthil Todadri ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The speaker describes physical properties and realizations of examples of Symmetry Protected Topological insulating phases of bosons. These phases generalize the concept of topological insulators to interacting bosons or fermions. First, discuss the possibility of an Integer Quantum Hall Effect for a system of interacting bosons as a very useful example of this kind of phase, then describe the properties of three dimensional time reversal symmetric topological insulators of bosons. Different characterizations of these 3d bosonic topological insulators will be discussed, for instance, their quantized magnetoelectric effect and protected surface states. The speaker points out interesting connections of the theory of these surface states with deconfined quantum criticality and other phenomena familiar from 2d quantum magnetism. The surface may also be in a gapped symmetry preserving phase but must then have surface topological order. Symmetries are realized in this surface topological ordered phase in a manner not possible in a strictly two dimensional system with a local realization of symmetry
Ubiquitin-dependent degradation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum by Ron Kopito ( )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In the third seminar of the Institute for Advanced Study lecture series on ubiquitin system and pathogenesis of diseases, Prof. Ron Kopito talks about dissection of the endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD) system in mammalian cells
Physical aspects of viral infectivity by W Gelbart ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Viruses are dreaded disease agents and consummately evolving organisms whose structural, genetic, cellular, and immunological aspects have long been investigated by biologists and medical researchers. But viruses are also simple, inanimate, objects whose physical properties outside the cell can be fruitfully addressed by a wide range of theoretical and experimental approaches. In particular, we have found it useful to understand differences in the life cycles of RNA and DNA viruses in terms of the differences between RNA and DNA as physical objects. RNA, for example, is a significantly more compact and flexible molecule than DNA containing the same amount of genetic information. Accordingly, many RNA viruses are assembled spontaneously by interaction of their RNA genome with its capsid proteins, whereas genome packaging in most DNA viruses requires a great deal of work to be done and necessarily involves the build-up of a high pressure in the capsid. In this talk, Prof Gelbart discusses his calculations and measurements of the self-assembly of RNA viruses from purified components and of the pressures and forces in DNA viruses. He features the role of statistical mechanical principles in developing the basic theory of these phenomena, and of the application of experimental techniques such as synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Finally, he discusses his ongoing efforts to reconstitute an infectious enveloped virus outside the cell, and to similarly synthesize "from scratch" various hybrid virus-like particles using a mix of components purified from plant and animal viruses
 
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Alternative Names
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Gao deng yan jiu yuan
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. 高等研究院
IAS
Institute for Advanced Study at HKUST
Xianggang ke ji da xue gao deng yan jiu yuan
香港科技大學高等研究院
Languages
English (24)