WorldCat Identities

Brachman, Jarret M.

Overview
Works: 6 works in 15 publications in 1 language and 44 library holdings
Genres: Bibliography  History 
Classifications: BP182, 320.557
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Jarret M Brachman Publications about Jarret M Brachman
Publications by  Jarret M Brachman Publications by Jarret M Brachman
Most widely held works by Jarret M Brachman
Militant ideology atlas research compendium ( )
3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
" ... An in-depth study of the Jihadi Movement's top thinkers and their most popular writings. This is the first systematic mapping of the ideology inspiring al-Qaeda. The CTC's researchers spent one year mining the most popular books and articles in al-Qaeda's online library, profiling hundreds of figures in the Jihadi Movement, and cataloging over 11,000 citations. The empirically supported findings of the project are surprising: The most influential Jihadi intellectuals are clerics from Jordan and Saudi Arabia, two of the US's closest allies in the Middle East. Among them, the Jordanian cleric Abu Muhammad al-Maqdisi has had the most impact on other Jihadi thinkers and has been the most consequential in shaping the worldview of the Jihadi Movement. In contrast, the study finds that Usama Bin Ladin and Ayman al-Zawahiri have had little influence on other Jihadi theorists and strategists. The Research Compendium contains summaries of all the texts used in the study as well as biographies of the texts' authors and the figures they cite most."--CTC web site
Stealing Al-Qa'ida's playbook by Jarret Brachman ( Book )
4 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The key to defeating the jihadi movement is identifying its strengths and weaknesses so that the former may be countered or co-opted and the latter exploited. In this article we argue that the people who know these strengths and weaknesses best are the jihadis themselves; one just needs to know where (and how) to look for their insights. Jihadi leaders are surprisingly frank when discussing the vulnerabilities of their movement and their strategies for toppling local regimes and undermining the United States. Their candor is, in large part, a consequence of struggles for leadership within the movement; thus, a leader of one group will publish his strategic vision in order to gain more recruits and achieve a reputation as a serious scholar worthy of respect. It is also a consequence of the United States success in destroying jihadi training camps and denying safe havens jihadi leaders have had to put their writings online so as to provide continuing guidance to a very decentralized following. In a sense, members of the jihadi movement have put their team's playbooks online. By mining these texts for their tactical and strategic insights, the United States will be able to craft effective tactics, techniques, and procedures to defeat followers of the movement. In what follows, we will demonstrate the efficacy of this approach by highlighting the insights we have gleaned from the works of four prominent jihadi ideologues
Global jihadism theory and practice by Jarret Brachman ( Book )
4 editions published between 2008 and 2010 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Global Jihadism: Theory and Practice exposes the core doctrine and strategy of today?s global Jihadist movement
Militant ideology atlas executive report ( )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
" ... An in-depth study of the Jihadi Movement's top thinkers and their most popular writings. This is the first systematic mapping of the ideology inspiring al-Qaeda. The CTC's researchers spent one year mining the most popular books and articles in al-Qaeda's online library, profiling hundreds of figures in the Jihadi Movement, and cataloging over 11,000 citations. The empirically supported findings of the project are surprising: The most influential Jihadi intellectuals are clerics from Jordan and Saudi Arabia, two of the US's closest allies in the Middle East. Among them, the Jordanian cleric Abu Muhammad al-Maqdisi has had the most impact on other Jihadi thinkers and has been the most consequential in shaping the worldview of the Jihadi Movement. In contrast, the study finds that Usama Bin Ladin and Ayman al-Zawahiri have had little influence on other Jihadi theorists and strategists. The Executive Report summarizes the main conclusions of this comprehensive effort and provides policy-relevant recommendations informed by these findings."--CTC web site
Terrorism and the American experience : constructing, contesting and countering terrorism since 1793 by Jarret Brachman ( Book )
2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Since its adoption into the American public lexicon, political actors have used the term "terrorism" to characterize any number of events in the United States and abroad. Despite the fact that "terrorism" has appeared throughout American public discourse for over two centuries, no consensus has emerged regarding its definition, its past manifestations, or its contemporary expressions. With no consensus, discursive ground has been historically ripe for social actors to contest its meaning and application. This investigation tracks that contestation since the founding the United States using a hermeneutical model of interpretation. Historical records reflect that social actors have actually drawn on the single "terrorism" term to refer to a wide spectrum of issues. As the investigation makes clear, the ways societies wrestle with what "terrorism" is impacts the ways that societies and governments bring resources to bear on those issues. With no consensus or objective metric, terrorism becomes little more than what a public accepts it to be---creating vast opportunity structures for agents to steer and guide meaning, and therefore, policy. In order to fully appreciate the past, present and future policy implications of "terrorism," scholars must first understand the dynamic and contested historical reconstructions of the concept
High-Tech Terror: Al-Qaeda's Use of New Technology ( )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Al-Qaeda has transformed itself into an organic social movement, using the Internet to make its virulent ideology accessible to anyone with a computer. For the United States to defeat al-Qaeda and the broader jihadi movement, it must first gain a better appreciation of the ways in which the movement is successfully fueling itself by harnessing new technologies
 
Audience Level
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.47 (from 0.00 for High-Tech ... to 0.92 for Terrorism ...)
Languages
English (15)
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