WorldCat Identities

Slagle, Nancy Elizabeth

Overview
Works: 4 works in 4 publications in 2 languages and 93 library holdings
Genres: Juvenile works  Fiction  Pictorial works  Criticism, interpretation, etc 
Roles: Illustrator, Author
Classifications: PZ7.V2755, [E]
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Nancy Elizabeth Slagle
Lucy's dance by Deb Vanasse( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Lucy helps her grandfather, and her entire community, recall the traditional dance festivals that they used to enjoy before the outsiders came. Includes author's note on the history of traditional Yupik dance festivals
Black wolf of the glacier : Alaska's Romeo by Deb Vanasse( Book )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
When a lonely wolf makes friends with her dog, Shawna's fear turns to love. Based on the true story of Romeo, a wolf who lived near Juneau's Mendenhall Glacier and lost his wolfpack as a young male
Luugiim yuraa by Deb Vanasse( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in Yupik languages and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Lucy helps her grandfather, and her entire community, recall the traditional dance festivals that they used to enjoy before the outsiders came. Includes author's note on the history of traditional Yupik dance festivals
Rereading identity : the uncanny in Janet Frame's "The Carpathians" by Nancy Elizabeth Slagle( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
"Janet Frame's ultimate novel, The Carpathians, joins the New Zealand tradition of literature of the uncanny, which has addressed the problem of post-colonial identity, though the novel's metafictional and psychological complexity are uniquely Framian. The work gains richness from a psychoanalytic reading with attention to the character John Henry Brecon, who claims authorship of the novel on its final page. As ekphratic author, he employs the uncanny mode, developing motifs and themes of heimlich and unheimlich set forth by Sigmund Freud's 1919 essay, 'The Uncanny.' John Henry's novel evokes uncanny sentiments through suppression and release of his subconscious and through uncertainty as to the location of reality. Literature fulfills John Henry's and New Zealand's needs to be haunted by a parental figure, yet self-sufficient. The novel examines three tensions: the linguistic and cultural self-repression of the Pakeha characters, the emotional barrier between characters; and the freezing of language to stifle emotion and creativity. During a surreal thunderstorm, John Henry breaks social, emotional, and linguistic barriers by converting uncertainty into the liberating emotion of fear. Frame's novel enhances the post-colonial relevance of uncanny literature as John Henry writes to redefine his community, himself, and his role as an author"--Leaf iii
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.02 (from 0.01 for Lucy's dan ... to 0.47 for Rereading ...)
Languages
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