WorldCat Identities

Martin, Michael F.

Overview
Works: 58 works in 103 publications in 1 language and 584 library holdings
Genres: History  Commercial treaties 
Roles: Author
Classifications: JK1108, 337.54073
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Michael F Martin
 
Most widely held works by Michael F Martin
India U.S. economic and trade relations by Michael F Martin( Book )

3 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

After decades of strained political relations, the U.S. and Indian governments are currently pursuing a "strategic partnership" based on numerous overlapping interests, shared values, and improved economic and trade relations. India is in the midst of a rapid economic expansion, and many U.S. companies view India as a lucrative market and a candidate for foreign investment. For its part, the current Indian government sees itself continuing the economic reforms started in 1991, aimed at transforming a quasi-socialist economy into a more open, market-oriented economy. However, the U.S. government is concerned that India's economic reforms are progressing too slowly and unevenly. This report will be updated as warranted
What's the difference? comparing U.S. and Chinese trade data by Michael F Martin( Book )

4 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

There is a large and growing difference between the official trade statistics released by the United States and the People's Republic of China. According to the United States, the 2006 bilateral trade deficit with China was $232.5 billion. According to China, its trade surplus with the United States was $144.3 billion -- $88.2 billion less. This paper examines the differences in the trade data from the two nations in two ways. First, it compares the trade figures at the two digit level using the Harmonized System to discern any patterns in the discrepancies between the U.S. and Chinese data. This comparison reveals that over two-thirds of the difference in the value of China's exports to the United States is attributable to five types of goods. The second approach to examining the differing trade data involves a review of the existing literature on the technical and non-technical sources of the trade data discrepancies. This report will not be updated
Hong Kong : ten years after the handover by Michael F Martin( Book )

5 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the 10 years that have passed since the reversion of Hong Kong from British to Chinese sovereignty, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) has selected its first Chief Executive, only to have him step down and be replaced in a controversial process. Belated changes by the British in the makeup of Hong Kong's Legislative Council were initially undone, but subsequent changes in the council's selection process have brought things back nearly to where they stood prior to the Handover. There also is unease about the independence of Hong Kong's judicial system and the protection provided by Hong Kong's Basic Law in light of decisions made by the Chinese government. The civil liberties of the people of Hong Kong remain largely intact, in part because of the increased politicization of the people of Hong Kong. The freedom of the press in Hong Kong is still strong, but also faces challenges. Economically, Hong Kong is still a major international financial center and a leading gateway into China. However, Hong Kong's economic interaction with the Chinese mainland has grown deeper and broader over the last 10 years than was expected. This closer tie to the mainland is being bolstered by the signing of a free trade agreement in 2003, called the "Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement" (CEPA). There has been a decline in Hong Kong's expatriate community, including U.S. nationals. Also, there is a perception that Hong Kong's middle class is disappearing. Underlying many of these social and cultural trends is a redefinition of Hong Kong by its residents, indicating a closer identification with China. Few of these long-term trends have had a significant effect on Hong Kong's relations with the United States. Under the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, the United States treats Hong Kong as a separate entity in a variety of political and economic areas so long as the HKSAR remains sufficiently autonomous from China
U.S. clothing and textile trade with China and the world : trends since the end of quotas by Michael F Martin( Book )

5 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The elimination of the last set of quotas of the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing (ATC) on January 1, 2005, ostensibly brought about the end of decades of quantitative restrictions on the international exchange of clothing and textiles. Trade analysts around the world expected that the final lifting of import limits would foster increased growth in clothing and textile trade, as well as a restructuring of clothing and textile production. In particular, some market watchers predicted a dramatic shift of clothing and textile production to China at the expense of many other nations
A hypothetical projection of the effect of pricing and taxation reforms on the economic development and political economy of the People's Republic of China by Michael F Martin( )

4 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. sanctions on Burma issues for the 113th Congress by Michael F Martin( )

in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Existing U.S. sanctions on Burma are based on various U.S. laws and Presidential Executive Orders. This report provides a brief history of U.S. policy towards Burma and the development of U.S. sanctions, a topical summary of those sanctions, and an examination of additional sanctions that have been considered, but not enacted, by Congress, or that could be imposed under existing law or executive orders. The report concludes with a discussion of options for Congress
U.S.-Vietnam economic and trade relations issues for the 112th Congress by Michael F Martin( )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Since the resumption of trade relations in the 1990s, Vietnam has rapidly risen to become a significant trading partner for the United States. Along with the growth of bilateral trade, a number of issues of common concerns, and sometimes disagreement, have emerged between the two nations. Congress may play a direct role in the U.S. policy on some of these issues"--Second page of April 5, 2011 report
Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange and U.S.-Vietnam relations by Michael F Martin( )

in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the end of the Vietnam War in 1975, there has been a gradual warming of bilateral relations between the United States and Vietnam, culminating in the appointment of the first U.S. ambassador to Vietnam in 1996 and granting Vietnam permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) in 2007. Over the last three decades, many -- but not all -- of the major issues causing tension between the two nations have been resolved. One major legacy of the Vietnam War that remains unresolved is the damage that Agent Orange, and its accompanying dioxin, have done to the people and the environment of Vietnam. For the last 30 years, this issue has generally been pushed to the background of bilateral discussions by other issues considered more important by the United States and/or Vietnam. With most of those issues presently resolved, the issue of Agent Orange/dioxin has emerged as a regular topic in bilateral discussions
China's economy and the Beijing Olympics by Michael F Martin( Book )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

China will host the 2008 Olympic Summer Games from August 8 to 24, 2008. Most of the events will be held in the vicinity of Beijing, with selected competitions held in Hong Kong, Qingdao, Qinhuangdao, Shanghai, Shenyang, and Tianjin. Since the International Olympic Committee's decision in July 2001 to select Beijing as the host for the 2008 Olympics, China has spent billions of dollars for facilities and basic infrastructure in preparation for the international event. China anticipates that the 2008 Olympics will provide both short-term and long-term direct and indirect benefits to its economy, as well as enhance the nation's global image. However, the experience of past host cities and China's current economic conditions cast serious doubt that the Games of the XXIX Olympiad will provide the level of economic growth being anticipated. This report will not be updated
The Proposed U.S.-Malaysia Free Trade Agreement by Michael F Martin( Book )

3 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This report addresses the proposed U.S.-Malaysia free trade agreement (FTA). It provides an overview of the current status of the negotiations, a review of the 2008 talks, an examination of leading issues that have arisen during the negotiations, a review of U.S. interests in the proposed agreement, a summary of the potential effects of a FTA on bilateral trade, and an overview of the legislative procedures to be followed if the proposed FTA is presented to Congress for approval. The proposed U.S.-Malaysia FTA is of interest to Congress because (1) it requires congressional approval; (2) it would continue the past trend toward greater trade liberalization and globalization; (3) it may include controversial provisions; and (4) it could affect trade flows for certain sensitive goods and industries in the United States. Since the U.S. Trade Representative announced on March 8, 2006, the Bush Administration's intent to negotiate a free trade agreement with Malaysia, eight rounds of negotiations have been held. A proposed ninth round of talks scheduled for November 2008 were postponed until after President Barack Obama's inauguration once it became apparent that several outstanding issues remained unresolved. Since the postponement, Malaysia has suspended the bilateral negotiations, possibly in response to U.S. support for Israel's military operations in Gaza. Efforts in 2008 to complete the FTA negotiations by the end of the Bush Administration were unsuccessful. There is general agreement that one major "sticking point" is Malaysia's government procurement policies, which give preferential treatment for certain types of Malaysian-owned companies. Other key outstanding provisions of the possible FTA as of the end of 2008 were intellectual property rights protection, protection of Malaysia's agricultural and automotive industry, and trade in services
International Trade: Rules of Origin by Vivian Catherine Jones( Book )

3 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Determining the country of origin of a product is important for properly assessing tariffs, enforcing trade remedies (such as antidumping and countervailing duties) or quantitative restrictions (tariff quotas), and statistical purposes. Other commercial trade policies are also linked with origin determinations, such as country of origin labeling and government procurement regulations. Rules of origin (ROO), used to determine the country of origin of merchandise entering the U.S. market, can be very simple, noncontroversial tools of international trade as long as all of the parts of a product are manufactured and assembled primarily in one country. However, when a finished product's component parts originate in many countries, as is often the case in today's global trading environment, determining origin can be a very complex, sometimes subjective, and time-consuming process. This report deals with ROO in three parts. First, we describe in more detail the reasons that country of origin rules are important and briefly describe U.S. laws and methods that provide direction in making these determinations. Second, we discuss briefly some of the more controversial issues involving rules of origin, including the apparently subjective nature of some CBP origin determinations, and the effects of the global manufacturing process on ROO. Third, we conclude with some alternatives and options that Congress could consider that might assist in simplifying the process
Understanding China's political system by Kerry Dumbaugh( Book )

5 editions published between 2009 and 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Analyzing the political system of the People's Republic of China (PRC) is difficult for many reasons. The inner workings of China's government have been shrouded in secrecy, and formal institutions can mask the underlying dynamics of political power. In addition, because of China's Leninist history, it is easy to assume that politics in China is rigidly hierarchical and authoritarian, whereas in reality, political power in China is diffuse, complex, and at times highly competitive."--Introduction
Burma's political prisoners and U.S. sanctions by Michael F Martin( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The installation of the Union Government in 2011 and the undertaking of initial reforms have raised the prospects for the resumption of a democratically elected civilian government in Burma after five decades of military rule. The release of Burma's political prisoners has a central role in U.S. policy and Burma's political future. Many of the U.S. sanctions on Burma were implemented after Burma's ruling military junta suppressed protests and detained many political prisoners. In addition, the removal of most of the existing U.S. sanctions require the release of all political prisoners in Burma. Similarly, hopes for a democratic government in Burma, as well as national reconciliation, would depend on the release of prisoners associated with the country's ethnic groups. The State Department is actively discussing the political prisoner issue, including the definition of political prisoners, with the Burmese government, opposition political parties, and representatives of some ethnic groups. In these discussions, U.S. officials emphasize the importance of the release of all political prisoners for the removal of U.S. sanctions on Burma. The status of Burma's political prisoners is likely to figure prominently in any congressional consideration of U.S. policy in Burma. Congress may chose to examine the political prisoner issue in Burma either separately or as part of a broader review of U.S. policy towards Burma. Congress may also consider taking up legislation to amend, modify, or remove some of the existing sanctions on Burma
Vietnamese Victims of Agent Orange and U.S.-Vietnam Relations( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the end of the Vietnam War in 1975, there has been a gradual warming of bilateral relations between the United States and Vietnam, culminating in the appointment of the first U.S. ambassador to Vietnam in 1996 and granting Vietnam permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) in 2007. Over the last three decades, many but not all of the major issues causing tension between the two nations have been resolved. One major legacy of the Vietnam War that remains unresolved is the damage that Agent Orange, and its accompanying dioxin, have done to the people and the environment of Vietnam. For the last 30 years, this issue has generally been pushed to the background of bilateral discussions by other issues considered more important by the United States and/or Vietnam. With most of those issues presently resolved, the issue of Agent Orange/dioxin has emerged as a regular topic in bilateral discussions
Pakistan's Capital Crisis: Implications for U.S. Policy by Michael F Martin( )

2 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pakistan -- a key U.S. ally in global efforts to combat Islamist militancy -- is in urgent need of an estimated $4 billion in capital to avoid defaulting on its sovereign debt. The elected government of President Asif Ali Zardari and Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gillani is seeking short-term financial assistance from a number of sources, including the International Monetary Fund (IMF), China, and an informal group of nations (including the United States) known as the "Friends of Pakistan." The Pakistani government reportedly has reservations about conditions on the assistance, expressing concerns that the conditions may create political and economic problems. The current crisis has placed some strain on U.S.-Pakistan relations. This report will be updated as circumstances warrant
Potential Trade Effects of Adding Vietnam to the Generalized System of Preferences Program( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In May 2008, Vietnam formally requested to be added to the U.S. Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) program as a "developing country." On June 20, 2008, the office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) announced that it was initiating a formal review of Vietnam's eligibility for GSP benefits and would accept public comments on the application until August 4, 2008. Vietnam has already been accepted into several other developed-country GSP programs around the world, including Canada, the European Union (EU), and Japan. The GSP statute provides the President with the authority to designate any country a beneficiary developing country, provided the country complies with various trade policy and labor conditions. Congress does not need to act to approve GSP status for Vietnam. The President is, however, required to notify Congress of his intention. The inclusion of Vietnam into the GSP program is generally viewed as another step in the development of closer bilateral relations
China's banking system : issues for Congress by Michael F Martin( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

China's banking system has been gradually transformed from a centralized, government-owned and government-controlled provider of loans into an increasingly competitive market in which different types of banks, including several U.S. banks, strive to provide a variety of financial services. Only three banks in China remain fully government-owned; most banks have been transformed into mixed ownership entities in which the central or local government may or may not be a major equity holder in the bank. The main goal of China's financial reforms has been to make its banks more commercially driven in their operations. However, China's central government continues to wield significant influence over the operations of many Chinese banks. Despite the financial reforms, allegations of various forms of unfair or inappropriate competition have been leveled against China's current banking system. While some question what they characterize as unfair competition in China's banking sector, others are concerned that many of China's banks may be insolvent and that China may experience a financial crisis. China's banking system raises two key issues that may be of interest to Congress. First, Congress may choose to examine allegations of inappropriate bank subsidies to major Chinese companies, particularly state-owned enterprises (SOEs). Second, under its WTO accession agreement, China was to open its domestic financial markets to foreign banks
Prospects for democracy in Hong Kong : results of the 2012 elections by Michael F Martin( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hong Kong selected a new Chief Executive and Legislative Council (Legco) in March and September of 2012, respectively. Both elections delivered surprising results for different reasons. The eventual selection of Leung Chu-ying (CY Leung) as Chief Executive came after presumed front-runner Henry Tang Ying-yen ran into a series of personal scandals. The Legco election results surprised many as several of the traditional parties fared poorly while several new parties emerged victorious. The 2012 elections in Hong Kong are important for the city's future prospect for democratic reforms because, under the territory's Basic Law, any changes in the election process for Chief Executive and Legco must be approved by two-thirds of the Legco members and receive the consent of the Chief Executive. Under the provision of a decision by China's Standing Committee of the National People's Congress issued in December 2007, the soonest that the Chief Executive and all the Legco members can be elected by universal suffrage are the elections of 2017 and 2020, respectively. As such, the newly elected Legco and CY Leung will have the opportunity to propose and adopt election reforms that fulfill the "ultimate aim" of the election of Hong Kong's leaders by universal suffrage. The outcome of Hong Kong's 2012 elections matters to Congress for three key reasons. First, the Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 states that it is U.S. policy to support democracy in Hong Kong. Second, the conduct of the 2012 elections and the possibility of additional political reforms may be indicators of the Chinese government's commitment to the Basic Law and its support for the democratic reforms in areas where it exercises sovereignty. Third, some scholars speculate that Hong Kong may serve as a testing ground for possible democratic reforms in Mainland China
How large is China's economy? Does it matter? by Wayne M Morrison( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Burma's 2010 elections : implications of the new constitution and election laws by Michael F Martin( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"On an undisclosed date in 2010, Burma plans to hold its first parliamentary elections in 20 years. The elections are to be held under a new constitution, supposedly approved in a national referendum held in 2008 in the immediate aftermath of the widespread destruction caused by Cyclone Nargis. The official results of the constitutional referendum are widely seen as fraudulent, but despite significant domestic and international opposition, Burma's ruling military junta--the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC)--has insisted on conducting the polls as part of what it calls a path to 'disciplined democracy.' On March 9, 2010, the SPDC released five new laws for the pending parliamentary elections. Three of the laws are about the three main types of parliaments stipulated in the constitution--the two houses of the national parliament (Pyidaungsu Hluttaw) and the Regional or State parliaments. The fourth law--the Political Parties Registration Law--sets conditions for the registration and operation of political parties in Burma; the fifth law establishes a Union Election Commission to supervise the parliamentary elections and political parties. The new laws were quickly subjected to sharp criticism, both domestically and overseas. In particular, the law on political parties was widely denounced for placing unreasonable restrictions on the participation of many opposition political leaders and Burma's Buddhist monks and nuns. U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Philip J. Crowley said the Political Parties Registration Law 'makes a mockery of the democratic process and ensures that the upcoming elections will be devoid of creditability.' There have also been objections to the terms of the Union Election Commission Law and the 17 people subsequently appointed to the commission by the SPDC. In late September 2009, the Obama Administration adopted a new policy on Burma. The policy keeps most of the elements of the Burma policies of the last two administrations in place, but adds a willingness to engage in direct dialogue with the SPDC on how to promote democracy and human rights in Burma, and greater cooperation on international security issues, such as counternarcotics efforts and nuclear nonproliferation. The Obama Administration accepts that little progress has been made during the seven months that the new policy has been in effect, but has indicated that it will remain in place for now. There are signs of concern among Members of Congress about the dearth of progress in Burma towards democracy and greater respect for human rights. Nine Senators sent a letter to President Obama on March 26, 2010, urging the imposition of additional economic sanctions on the SPDC in light of 'a set of profoundly troubling election laws.' However, another Senator perceives 'several substantive gestures' on the part of the SPDC, and suggests it is time to increase engagement with the Burmese government. The 111th Congress has already taken action with respect to Burma, such as renewing the Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act of 2003. If it were to determine that additional actions should be taken, there are several alternatives available. Among those alternatives are holding hearings or seminars on the political situation in Burma, pushing the Obama Administration to implement existing sanctions on Burma more vigorously, and adding or removing existing sanctions. This report will be updated as circumstances warrant."
 
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India U.S. economic and trade relations
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