WorldCat Identities

Huber, Martin

Overview
Works: 12 works in 34 publications in 2 languages and 93 library holdings
Roles: Editor
Classifications: RD563, 362.10943
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Martin Huber Publications about Martin Huber
Publications by  Martin Huber Publications by Martin Huber
Most widely held works by Martin Huber
Does leaving welfare improve health? Evidence for Germany by Martin Huber ( )
8 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Using exceptionally rich linked administrative and survey information on German welfare recipients we investigate the health effects of transitions from welfare to employment and of assignments to welfare-to-work programmes. Applying semi-parametric propensity score matching estimators we find that employment substantially increases (mental) health. The positive effects are mainly driven by males and individuals with bad initial health conditions and are largest for males with poor health. In contrast, the effects of welfare-to-work programmes, including subsidized jobs, are ambiguous and statistically insignificant for most outcomes. Robustness checks that include a semi-parametric instrumental variable approach do not provide reasons for concern
Do German welfare to work programmes reduce welfare and increase work ( )
9 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Many Western economies have reformed their welfare systems with the aim of activating welfare recipients by increasing welfare-to-work programmes and job search enforcement. We evaluate the three most important German welfare-to-work programmes implemented after a major reform in January 2005 ("Hartz IV"). Our analysis is based on a unique combination of large scale survey and administrative data that is unusually rich with respect to individual, household, agency level, and regional information. We use this richness to allow for a selection-on-observables approach when doing the econometric evaluation. We find that short-term training programmes on average increase their participants' employment perspectives and that all programmes induce further programme participation. We also show that there is considerable effect heterogeneity across different subgroups of participants that could be exploited to improve the allocation of welfare recipients to the specific programmes and thus increase overall programme effectiveness. -- Welfare-to-work policies ; propensity score matching ; programme evaluation ; panel data ; targeting
The effect of firms' partial retirement policies on the labour market outcomes of their employees by Martin Huber ( )
8 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In this paper, we assess the impact of firms introducing part-time work schemes for gradual labour market exit of elderly workers on their employees' labour market outcomes. The analysis is based on unique linked employer-employee data that combine high-quality survey and administrative data. Our results suggest that partial or gradual retirement options offered by firms are an important tool to alleviate the negative effects of low labour market attachment of elderly workers in ageing societies. When combined with financial incentives to hire unemployed or young jobseekers as replacement, they seem to be particularly beneficial, especially when labour market conditions are difficult. Under such circumstances, they can even have positive spill-over effects on younger workers. Firms should thus be encouraged to offer such schemes
Treatment evaluation in the presence of sample selection by Martin Huber ( Book )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Microeconometric Estimators and Tests based on Nonparametric Methods, Quantile Regression, and Resampling by Martin Huber ( )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Quantile regression in the presence of sample selection by Martin Huber ( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Most sample selection models assume that the errors are independent of the regressors. Under this assumption, all quantile and mean functions are parallel, which implies that quantile estimators cannot reveal any (per definition non-existing) heterogeneity. However, quantile estimators are useful for testing the independence assumption, because they are consistent under the null hypothesis. We propose tests for this crucial restriction that are based on the entire conditional quantile regression process after correcting for sample selection bias. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that they are powerful and two empirical illustrations indicate that violations of this assumption are likely to be ubiquitous inlabor economics. Keywords: Sample selection, quantile regression, independence, test
Sharp bounds on causal effects under sample selection by Martin Huber ( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In many empirical problems, the evaluation of treatment effects is complicated by sample selection such that the outcome is only observed for a non-random subpopulation. In the absence of instruments and/or tight parametric assumptions, treatment effects are not point identified, but can be bounded under mild restrictions. Previous work on partial identification has primarily focused on the "always selected" (whose outcomes are observed irrespective of the treatment). This paper complements those studies by considering further populations, namely the "compliers" (whose selection states react to the treatment) and the selected population. We derive sharp bounds under various assumptions (monotonicity and stochastic dominance) and provide an empirical application to a school voucher experiment
Testing instrument validity for LATE identification based on inequality moment constraints by Martin Huber ( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This paper proposes bootstrap tests for the validity of instrumental variables (IV) in just identified treatment effect models with endogeneity. We demonstrate that the IV assumptions required for the identification of the local average treatment effect (LATE) allow us to both point identify and bound the mean potential outcomes (i) of the always takers (those treated irrespective of the instrument) under treatment and (ii) of the never takers (never treated irrespective of the instrument) under non-treatment. The point identified means must lie within their respective bounds, which provides four testable inequality moment constraints for IV validity. Furthermore, we show that a similar logic applies to testing the assumptions needed to identify distributional features (e.g., local quantile treatment effects). Finally, we discuss how testing power can be increased by imposing dominance/equality assumptions on the potential outcome distributions of different subpopulations
Testing instrument validity in sample selection models by Martin Huber ( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This paper proposes tests for instrument validity in sample selection models with non-randomly censored outcomes. Such models commonly invoke an exclusion restriction (i.e., the availability of an instrument affecting selection, but not the outcome) and additive separability of the errors in the selection process. These assumptions allow us to both point identify and bound the outcome distribution of the subpopulation of the always selected, whose outcomes are observed irrespective of the instrument value. As the point must lie within its bounds, this yields two testable inequality constraints. We apply our tests to two instruments conventionally exploited for the estimation of female wage equations: non-wife/husband's income and the number of (young) children. Considering eight empirical applications, our results suggest that the former is not a valid instrument, while the validity of the latter is not refuted on statistical grounds
Fusschirurgie in der Praxis ( Book )
1 edition published in 2013 in German and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
How to Control for Many Covariates? Reliable Estimators Based on the Propensity Score by Martin Huber ( )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
We investigate the finite sample properties of a large number of estimators for the average treatment effect on the treated that are suitable when adjustment for observable covariates is required, like inverse probability weighting, kernel and other variants of matching, as well as different parametric models. The simulation design used is based on real data usually employed for the evaluation of labour market programmes in Germany. We vary several dimensions of the design that are of practical importance, like sample size, the type of the outcome variable, and aspects of the selection process. We find that trimming individual observations with too much weight as well as the choice of tuning parameters is important for all estimators. The key conclusion from our simulations is that a particular radius matching estimator combined with regression performs best overall, in particular when robustness to misspecifications of the propensity score is considered an important property. -- propensity score matching ; kernel matching ; inverse probability weighting ; selection on observables ; empirical Monte Carlo study ; finite sample properties
Does leaving welfare improve health? Evidence for Germany by Martin Huber ( )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Using exceptionally rich linked administrative and survey information on German welfare recipients we investigate the health effects of transitions from welfare to employment and of assignments to welfare-to-work programmes. Applying semi-parametric propensity score matching estimators we find that employment substantially increases (mental) health. The positive effects are mainly driven by males and individuals with bad initial health conditions and are largest for males with poor health. In contrast, the effects of welfare-to-work programmes, including subsidized jobs, are ambiguous and statistically insignificant for most outcomes. Robustness checks that include a semi-parametric instrumental variable approach do not provide reasons for concern
 
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Alternative Names
Huber, M. 1980-
Languages
English (33)
German (1)