WorldCat Identities

Nesbitt, Wanda L. 1956-

Overview
Works: 5 works in 5 publications in 1 language and 5 library holdings
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Wanda L Nesbitt
China's Grand Strategy and the Statecraft of Zhou Enlai( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Communist China's decision to initiate a dialogue with the capitalist, imperialist United States led to the watershed visit to Beijing of President Nixon and changed the dynamics of international politics. Zhou Enlai, the statesman entrusted by Chairman Mao with carrying out this extraordinary reversal, guided a risky venture to solid success by employing a strategy that focused on the geopolitical factors pushing the two nations together rather than on the differences separating them. Patient, careful diplomacy was the key to Zhou's success in this endeavor, but equally important was his (and Mao's) ability to assess the world in realistic terms and craft means of both deterring the threats they perceived and advancing China's overall interests. This paper examines why Chinese leaders decided to end their nation's isolation from the West, the strategy they designed to achieve this goal, and the successful methods used to carry it out
Military Strategy in Ethnic Conflicts( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This quotation aptly describes the international environment we face today, yet it was written nearly twenty years ago (1979) in the midst of the Cold War. Furthermore, its author, citing over 40 "major" bloodlettings from 1945-79 involving over 14 million deaths, argued that the prevailing bi-polar international order made ethnic conflicts more rather than less difficult to deal with because the superpowers were constrained from intervention by concern that their actions might lead to a larger war. It is therefor ironic to find so many of today's observers of the international scene arguing that the Cold War kept a lid on ethnic conflict and that with its passing this type of conflict is likely to proliferate. Yet as one survey the globe it is easy to cite dozens of locations where ethnic violence has either recently occurred or could break out in the near future. My purpose is not to argue the accuracy of either view, but rather to show that ethnic conflict is an ongoing feature of the international arena that has always been difficult for the world's major powers to handle. In this paper I will address the question of why ethnic conflicts are so difficult, then look at whether and how military interventions can contribute to the successful management/resolution of these disputes
Jonas Savimbi and UNITA's Struggle for Independence. An Application of Mao's Theory of Warfare?( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since biblical times man has sought an answer to the dilemma of how those who are weak can conquer those who are powerful. Mao Tse-tung's success over both a foreign invader, Japan, and a domestic foe, Chiang Kai-Shek and the Nationalist Chinese, popularized and seemed to validate his theories on how to accomplish the above. One of the many devotees of Mao was an Angolan intellectual, Jonas Savimbi, who was determined to liberate his country from Portugese colonial rule. Using the key elements of Mao's theory, this paper will examine Savimbi's application of that theory and attempt to address the question of whether UNITA's failure to achieve control in Angola resulted from faulty application of the theory
Population Issues and the F'96 Foreign Aid Appropriations Bill( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Foreign aid appropriations bills have traditionally been the least popular of the 13 annual spending bills that Congress must pass because the programs funded therein are generally perceived as benefitting foreign, rather than American, citizens. Legislators in both the House and the Senate recognize the necessity of this appropriations bill and, at least since 1980-81, have counted on the popularity of aid to Israel to be the catalyst for action The foreign aid spending bill for fiscal year 1996 (FY'96), the first such bill to be managed by the Republican Congress elected in 1994, moved through both houses with surprising speed and attracted strong bi-partisan support However, an unprecedented situation]on arose when House and Senate conferees failed to resolve a predominantly ideological dispute over funding for population activities, a little-known program which accounted for less than $400 million of the $12 billion in funds appropriated by the bill' A four-month stalemate ensued that was broken only by high-level negotiations between the White House and the House Republican leadership This paper looks at why the population program became the central issue dividing the House, the Senate and the Administration, and at how key actors influenced the process and the outcome
U.S. National Security Strategy for South America( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The current national security strategy of "Enlargement and Engagement" states that the unprecedented triumph of democracy and market economies throughout the Western Hemisphere offers an unparalleled opportunity to secure the benefits of peace and stability and to promote economic growth and trade. The overreaching objective is identified as being to preserve and defend civilian-elected governments and strengthen democratic practices respectful of human rights. This is to be accomplished in large part by working with Latin American defense establishments (the unstated but traditional threat to democracy in the region: to strengthen and deepen their commitment to democracy, human rights and civilian control in defense matters. Promoting economic growth and trade is furthered through the commitment of the 34 democratic nations in the region to establishing free trade by the year 2005. Aside from the implied threats of reversals of democratic government or free market policies, drug trafficking is the only issue identified as a serious threat to democracy and security
 
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