WorldCat Identities

Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.). Geo-Heat Center

Overview
Works: 115 works in 125 publications in 1 language and 318 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals 
Roles: Researcher
Classifications: TJ280.7, 621.44
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.). Publications about Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.).
Publications by Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.). Publications by Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.).
Most widely held works by Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.).
Quarterly bulletin ( )
in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Marketing the Klamath Falls Geothermal District Heating system ( )
2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The new marketing strategy for the Klamath Falls system has concentrated on offering the customer an attractive and easy to understand rate structure, reduced retrofit cost and complexity for his building along with an attractive package of financing and tax credits. Initial retrofit costs and life-cycle cost analysis have been conducted on 22 buildings to date. For some, the retrofit costs are simply too high for the conversion to make sense at current geothermal rates. For many, however, the prospects are good. At this writing, two new customers are now connected and operating with 5 to 8 more buildings committed to connect this construction season after line extensions are completed. This represents nearly a 60% increase in the number of buildings connected to the system and a 40% increase in system revenue
Feasibility study for the direct use of geothermal energy for onion dehydration in Vale/Ontario area, Oregon : final report ( )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
An Engineered study of the use of geothermal energy to dry wood waste for densification ( Book )
1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers ( )
2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) in order to determine the effect of H₂S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H₂S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10° or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft² heat transfer surface area
Pilot fruit drier for Los Azufres geothermal field, Michoacan, Mexico ( )
2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) has a Division in charge of the exploration of a geothermal reservoir located in Los Azufres, State of Michoacan. At present, CFE is only using the steam of the wells and rejecting the hot water that comes off associated with the steam. Based on a trip to the Los Azufres geothermal field in December of 1992, a design for a pilot geothermal fruit drier was undertaken for CFE. The details of the geothermal field and the local fruit production are detailed
Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers ( )
2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) to determine the effect of H[sub 2]S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H[sub 2]S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10[degrees] or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft[sup 2] heat transfer surface area
Geothermal heating facilities for Carson Elementary School and Wind River Middle School ( Book )
1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring. Final report ( )
2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring
Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Federal Assistance Program, Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1994 ( )
1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The report summarizes activities of the Geo-Heat Center (GHC) at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 1995. It describes contacts with parties during this period related to assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, resources and equipment. Research is also being conducted on geothermal energy cost evaluation, low-temperature geothermal resource assessment, use of silica waste from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field as construction materials and geothermal heat pumps. Outreach activities include the publication of a quarterly Bulletin on direct heat applications and dissemination of information on low-temperature geothermal resources and utilization
Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1993 ( )
1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report consists of brief summaries of the activities of the Geo-Heat Center during the report period. Technical assistance was given to requests from 20 states in the following applications: space and district heating; geothermal heat pumps; greenhouses; aquaculture; industrial plants; electric power; resource/well; equipment; and resort/spa. Research and development activities progressed on (1) compilation of data on low-temperature resources and (2) evaluation of groundwater vs. ground-coupled heat pumps. Also summarized are technology transfer activities and geothermal progress monitoring activities
Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1997 ( )
1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-98 (October--December 1997). It describes 216 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps and material for high school debates, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, space heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, electric power and snow melting. Research activities include work on model construction specifications of lineshaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers, a comprehensive aquaculture developer package and revisions to the Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 18, No. 4) which was devoted entirely to geothermal activities in South Dakota, dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisition and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities
Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1993 ( )
1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
CHC (Geo-Heated Center) staff provided assistance to 103 requests from 26 states, and from Canada, Egypt, Mexico, China, Poland and Greece. A breakdown of the requests according to application include: space and district heating (19), geothermal heat pumps (24), greenhouses (10), aquaculture (4), industrial (4), equipment (3), resources (27), electric power (2) and other (20). Progress is reported on: (1) evaluation of lineshaft turbine pump problems, (2) pilot fruit drier and (3) geothermal district heating marketing tools and equipment investigation. Four presentations and two tours were conducted during the quarter, GHC Quarterly Bulletin Vol. 14, No. 4 was prepared, 14 volumes were added to the library and information was disseminated to 45 requests. Progress reports are on: (1) GHP Teleconference 93, (2) California Energy Buys Glass Mountain Prospect from Unocal and Makes Deal for Newberry Caldera, (3) New Power Plant Planned, (4) Vale to Get Power Plant, (5) BPA Approves Geothermal Project, (6) Update: San Bernardino Reservoir Study, (7) Twenty-nine Palms Geothermal Resources, (8) Geo-Ag Heat Center, Lake County, and (9) Update: Geothermal Wells at Alturas
Geothermal home heating facilities : Green Valley Estates, Fernley, Nevada ( Book )
1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Geothermal feasibility study for City of Sonoma, California : four municipal buildings ( Book )
1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Geothermal feasibility study for Malting Investments Inc. ( Book )
1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A spreadsheet for geothermal direct use cost evaluation ( )
1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In order to be seriously considered as an alternative in any project, an energy source must be easily characterized in terms of cost, both capital and unit energy cost. Historically, this has been a difficult hurdle for geothermal energy. Its costs vary with the depth and character of the resource, number of production and injection wells, and a host of other parameters. As a result, even in cases where developers are interested in using the geothermal, identifying its costs has been a cumbersome process. To address this problem, the Geo-Heat Center has developed a spreadsheet which allows potential users to quickly evaluate the capital cost and unit energy cost of accessing a geothermal resource
Selected cost considerations for geothermal district heating in existing single-family residential areas ( )
1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In the past, district heating (geothermal or conventionally fueled) has not been widely applied to the single-family residential sector. Low-heat load density is the commonly cited reason for this. Although it's true that load density in these areas is much lower than for downtown business districts, other frequently overlooked factors may compensate for load density. In particular, costs for distribution system installation can be substantially lower in some residential areas due to a variety of factors. This reduced development cost may partially compensate for the reduced revenue resulting from low-load density. This report examines cost associated with the overall design of the system (direct or indirect system design), distribution piping installation, and customer branch lines. It concludes with a comparison of the costs for system development and the revenue from an example residential area
Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1996 ( )
1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R & D, and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center. It describes 95 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with goethermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics, and resources. Research activities are summarized on geothermal district heating system cost evaluation and silica waste utilization project. Outreach activities include publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, goethermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization
Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1994 ( )
1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Geo-Heat Center provides technical assistance on geothermal direct heat applications to developers, consultants and the public which could include: data and information on low-temperature (< 1500 C) resources, space and district heating, geothermal heat pumps, greenhouses, aquaculture, industrial processes and other technologies. This assistance could include preliminary engineering feasibility studies, review of direct-use project plans, assistance in project material and equipment selection, analysis and solutions of project operating problems, and information on resources and utilization. The following are brief descriptions of technical assistance provided during the second quarter of the program
 
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Audience level: 0.86 (from 0.22 for Geothermal ... to 1.00 for Marketing ...)
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English (25)