WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:12:30 2014 UTClccn-no950400380.00Cyberspace security and safety /0.531.00A study of the feasibility of detecting nuclear explosions by means of antineutrinos /43885011no 950400383902885Hundley, Richardlccn-n78083407Rand Corporationlccn-n91060525National Defense Research Institute (U.S.)lccn-n79004228United StatesDefense Advanced Research Projects Agencylccn-n78093608Anderson, Robert H.(Robert Helms)1939-lccn-n80069002Ditchley Foundationlccn-no94040897United StatesNational Intelligence Councillccn-no2002084794International Relations and Security Network (Switzerland)lccn-no98118234Great BritainDefence Evaluation and Research Agencylccn-n2003009000Anderson, Robert H.1959-lccn-n79021946United StatesDepartment of DefenseHundley, Richard O.Conference proceedingsHistoryInformation technologyUnited StatesArmed Forces--OrganizationMilitary art and scienceMilitary historyInformation societyDigital communicationsInformation superhighwayComputer networks--Security measuresComputer securityInformation technology--Social aspectsCyberspaceInformation technology--Economic aspectsInformation technology--Government policyInformation policyEuropeMilitary planning--MethodologyMilitary readiness--Evaluation--MethodologySoftware protectionUnited States.--Department of DefenseDatabase securityComputers--Access controlRisk assessmentInformation warfareMilitary art and science--Technological innovationsUnited States.--Defense Nuclear AgencyNuclear weaponsInformation society--Social aspectsInformation networks--Security measuresUltraviolet spectroscopyAdministrative agencies--ReorganizationNuclear weapons--Government policyElectromagnetic interferenceAtmosphere, UpperWeapons systems--Technological innovationsVan Allen radiation beltsCollisions (Nuclear physics)ElectronsMilitary policySpace vehicles--Electrostatic chargingQuantum electrodynamicsBremsstrahlungMilitary planningSpace vehicles--Atmospheric entryAerodynamics, HypersonicNuclear explosionsAntineutrinosComputer networks--Social aspectsTwenty-first century--ForecastingStrategy193519601961196219631964199319941996199719981999200020012003200441071970355.40973U10416177ocn044963991file19990.35Hundley, Richard OPast revolutions, future transformations what can the history of revolutions in military affairs tell us about transforming the U.S. military?HistoryAdvances in technology can bring about dramatic changes in military operations, often termed "revolutions in military affairs" or RMAs. Such technology-driven changes in military operations are not merely a recent phenomenon: they have been occurring since the dawn of history, they will continue to occur in the future, and they will continue to bestow a military advantage on the first nation to develop and use them. Accordingly, it is important to the continued vitality and robustness of the U.S. defense posture for the DoD R & D community to be aware of technology developments that could revolutionize military operations in the future, and for the U.S. military services to be on the lookout for revolutionary ways in which to employ those technologies in warfare. This report examines the history of past RMAs, to see what can be learned from them regarding the challenge confronting the DoD today, when it has set out on a concerted effort to bring about a technology-driven transformation of the U.S. military to achieve the operational goals outlined in Joint Vision 2010. Among its many findings are three of particular note: RMAs are rarely brought about by dominant players (such as the U.S. military is today). For a dominant player to bring about an RMA requires a receptive organizational climate, fostering a continually refined vision of how war may change in the future and encouraging vigorous debate regarding the future of the organization; senior officers with traditional credentials willing to sponsor new ways of doing things and able to establish new promotion pathways for junior officers practicing a new way of war; mechanisms for experimentation, to discover, learn, test and demonstrate new ideas; and ways of responding positively to the results of successful experiments, in terms of doctrinal changes, acquisition programs, and force structure modifications. The DoD has some of these elements today, but is missing others. The report makes specific suggestions regarding ways of filling in the missing elements. Doing these things will facilitate DoD's force transformation activities and help ensure that the next RMA is brought about by the United States. and not some other nation+-+8452758835145013ocn055203163file20030.47Hundley, Richard OThe global course of the information revolution recurring themes and regional variationsAdvances in information technology are heavily influencing ways in which business, society, and government work and function throughout the globe, bringing many changes to everyday life, in a process commonly termed the "information revolution." This book paints a picture of the state of the information revolution today--in its technological, business and financial, governmental, and social and cultural dimensions--and how it will likely progress in the near- to mid-term future (10 to 15 years). It focuses separately on different regions of the world--North America, Europe, the Asia-Pacific region, Latin America, the Middle East and North Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa. In addition to these regional variations and projections, the authors look in depth at recurring themes in information technology's impact around the world, including, for example, its influence on business models and its relationship with social and cultural value systems. The research presented by the authors is the result of a multiyear, multidisciplinary effort of RAND and the National Intelligence Council+-+89798588353718ocn070754212file20000.79The global course of the information revolution political, economic, and social consequences : proceedings of an international conferenceConference proceedingsRand Corporation has embarked on a three-year effort, sponsored by the National Intelligence Council's Strategic Estimates Program, to chart the course of changes brought about by the information revolution over the next 10 to 20 years. As a first step, RAND convened in November 1999 an international conference on political/governmental, business/financial, and social/cultural trends as related to the information revolution. These are the proceedings of that conference. Across the diverse conference discussions, a shared vision emerged of an information revolution future of more "information work" and new business models; an increase in electronic commerce; challenges to the nation state; creation of a number of sub-, trans-, and supra-national groupings; more porous borders; and new fault lines within and between nations. The world can expect increasing disparities (winners and losers) among nations, concerns about privacy, and effects on national cultures+-+75037588351817ocn036079460book19960.93Hundley, Richard OSecurity in cyberspace : challenges for society : proceedings of an international conferenceConference proceedingsAs more and more human activities--involving governments, businesses, individuals, and society as a whole--move into "cyberspace," they become exposed to a new set of vulnerabilities that can be exploited by a wide spectrum of "bad actors" for a variety of motives. This paper discusses questions such as: (1) How serious are the likely threats to different segments of society, both today and in the future, from cyberspace-based attacks by various "bad actors"--such as hackers, criminals, disgruntled employees, terrorists and nation-sponsored informational attacks? (2) What are the current best strategies for achieving security in cyberspace? (3) What roles and missions should various national entities (police, defense forces, local governments, etc.) be assigned to counter these threats, given that it is often unclear who the perpetrator is, and from where the threat emanates? (4) Are there specific services and institutions in each nation--which we term a "national interest element"--that play such vital roles in society that their protection from cyberspace-based attacks should be of national concern? This paper does not answer all these questions, but at least attempts to structure the discussion so that meaningful answers can be obtained+-+65297588351657ocn048969111book20010.93Hundley, Richard OThe future of the information revolution in Europe : proceedings of an international conferenceConference proceedings"This report contains the proceedings of a conference focused on the information revolution in Europe, that was held in Limelette, Belgium, in April 2001. Participants in this conference argued that the information revolution is following a somewhat different course in Europe than in America: the process of "creative destruction" by which new technologies and business paradigms replace their predecessors is proceeding more slowly, Europe's emphasis on economic and social equity results in a less aggressive approach to new IT business opportunities than does the "winner-take-all" business mentality in the U.S., and Europe's "top down" planning mentality is fostering more deliberate decision making. As a result, the information revolution has been proceeding slower in Europe than in America, with the U.S. in the vanguard in most IT-related areas and Europe following along somewhat behind. This is likely to continue for at least the next few years, if not longer."--Rand abstracts954ocn031906206book19940.88Hundley, Richard OSecurity in cyberspace : an emerging challenge for societyAs more and more human activities--involving governments, businesses, individuals, and society as a whole--move into "cyberspace," they become exposed to a new set of vulnerabilities that can be exploited by a wide spectrum of "bad actors" for a variety of motives. This paper discusses questions such as: (1) How serious are the likely threats to different segments of society, both today and in the future, from cyberspace-based attacks by various "bad actors"--such as hackers, criminals, disgruntled employees, terrorists and nation-sponsored informational attacks? (2) What are the current best strategies for achieving security in cyberspace? (3) What roles and missions should various national entities (police, defense forces, local governments, etc.) be assigned to counter these threats, given that it is often unclear who the perpetrator is, and from where the threat emanates? (4) Are there specific services and institutions in each nation--which we term a "national interest element"--that play such vital roles in society that their protection from cyberspace-based attacks should be of national concern? This paper does not answer all these questions, but at least attempts to structure the discussion so that meaningful answers can be obtained863ocn040717973book19980.92Anderson, Robert HThe implications of COTS vulnerabilities for the DOD and critical U.S. infrastructures : what can/should the DOD do?There is a growing reliance on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products within critical systems on which the security and safety of the United States depend. Next-generation command and control systems within DoD depend heavily on COTS hardware and software. Typical COTS software products are large and complex, often comprising millions of lines of source code. This complexity precludes complete, unambiguous analysis of the code for "trap doors," "logic bombs," and other malevolent code possibly buried within it. In addition, increasing amounts of such code are developed by non-U.S. citizens and offshore workers with uncertain loyalties to the United States. Market forces favor functionality over security and reliability, so the problem is unlikely to disappear. In addition, DoD and the U.S. government lack sufficient market strength to compel greater security in COTS products. There are two basic approaches to "managing" this problem: making COTS used by the DoD more secure; and learning to live with insecure COTS. There are initiatives that can be undertaken in both of these areas. The authors have identified a number of candidate elements supporting each of these approaches. Those specific elements can support a variety of overall solution strategies. An outline of a possible research agenda addressing this problem is presented834ocn036316971book19960.92Hundley, Richard OA qualitative methodology for the assessment of cyberspace-related risksThe problem addressed here is assessing the risks to which some organization or activity is exposed as a result of some combination of cyberspace-related vulnerabilities and threats. It is an attempt to assess risk without resorting to quantitative methods, which can appear to offer more accuracy and precision than is in fact warranted. The methodology proposed, although a work in progress, has three favorable points: (1) it is transparent, in that the nature and substance of the judgments and combinatorial steps are apparent; (2) it does not pretend to greater accuracy than can be justified; and (3) it is believed to capture the key elements and interactions involved in assessing cyberspace risk. The methodology does, however, require the user to make a large number of qualitative judgments and to combine them in a subjective fashion. The paper is presented as an annotated briefing184ocn032585465book19940.92Hundley, Richard OFuture technology-driven revolutions in military operations : results of a workshopConference proceedingsFuture breakthroughs in military technology will bestow an advantage on the first nation to apply them. Which technologies show enough promise to warrant greater U.S. defense R&D investment at this time? RAND hosted two workshops to address this question. Five promising program areas were identified: (1) development of insect-size flying and crawling systems capable of a wide variety of battlefield sensor missions; (2) use of techniques from molecular biology and biotechnology to develop new molecular electronic materials, components, and computational architectures; (3) use of modern microelectronic and information technologies as the basis for a new advanced-technology logistic system; (4) development of techniques and strategies to protect U.S. interests in "cyberspace"; and (5) use of a variety of technologies to enhance the survivability, mobility, and mission performance of individual soldiers93ocn233153865com19940.93Hundley, Richard OAn Assessment of Defense Nuclear Agency functions : pathways toward a new nuclear infrastructure for the nationThis report evaluates options for carrying out functions of the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA). Options proposed were transferring DNA's functions to individual services and the Advanced Research Project Agency; maintaining DNA as a separate agency tailored to today's security environment; transferring functions to the Department of Energy weapons laboratories; combining any of these options; or reorganizing DNA to reduce costs significantly. The report argues that DNA's functions must be assessed in the framework of the national nuclear infrastructure and identifies three continuing requirements with respect to nuclear weapons: caring for the nuclear stockpile, maintaining a capability to understand and deal with the use of nuclear weapons, and reducing the threat of nuclear weapons. DNA performs these functions and a fourth pertaining to conventional technologies. The report concludes that no single agency could accomplish all DNA's functions without incurring substantial risk. Functions could be spread across services and other agencies, but that approach exacerbates an unwise trend toward fragmentation. No option promises significant cost savings. The larger concern is the national infrastructure, which could be consolidated to counter the effects of fragmentation+-+609065883581ocn036535307book19630.98Hundley, Richard OUltraviolet spectroscopy of the upper atmosphere : (Part 1 of an examination of the application to satellite meteorology of various segments of the electromagnetic spectrum)61ocn003192424book19620.98Hundley, Richard OBremsstrahlung during the collision of low-energy electrons with neutral atoms and molecules61ocn043967314book19610.96Hundley, Richard OSatellite charge-up in the outer Van Allen belt41ocn070897893book19601.00Hundley, Richard OA study of the feasibility of detecting nuclear explosions by means of antineutrinos41ocn071291392book19640.97Hundley, Richard OAir radiation from nonequilibrium wakes of blunt hypersonic reentry vehiclesThe wakes of reentry vehicles at altitudes of 100,000 ft or above will not be in chemical equilibrium. Under these conditions the wake radiation cannot be obtained from the ordinary equilibrium calculations, but a detailed study must be made of the chemical kinetics of the nonequilibrium wake. This memorandum presents the results of such a study for the case of a blunt, nonablating vehicle. Knowledge of the important chemical reactions for a pure air wake is fairly complete. However, large uncertainties exist with respect to hypersonic turbulence. For that reason, two recently proposed models of the turbulent mixing process are used in this memorandum: the inviscid random convection model, and the homogeneous mixing model. These two models give radiant intensities for the various chemiluminescent reactions that differ as much as several orders of magnitude. This large difference is another illustration of the importance of increasing our knowledge of hypersonic turbulence. The radiation estimates presented here show that the nonequilibrium wake radiation in the UV, visible, and near IR should dominate the gas cap and surface radiation at altitudes above about 100,000 ft. (Author)22ocn640977619com20000.94Global Course of the Information Revolution, Technological TrendsThe global course of the information revolution : technological trends : proceedings of an international conferenceConference proceedingsReports on a conference sponsored by the National Intelligence Council in May 2000 that concentrated on technical trends in the information revolution, focusing in particular on the resulting new artifacts and services that might become widespread during the next 20 years. Participants saw a convergence of voice and data communications and a quantum jump in bandwidth during the next two decades, along with limited machine translation. A multitude of diverse, powerful, inexpensive sensors and devices capable of limited-distance wireless communications will come onto the market and computing and information systems will become much more ubiquitous, with convergence of wireless telephones, voice and e-mail messaging, and smart appliances. A likely shift in business emphasis from products to services will have an impact in such areas as health care, education, entertainment, and supply-chain management. Participants also discussed individual and societal tensions that could arise from these developments, such as battles between advocates of "open" and "closed" worlds of protocols and standards, and the threats to intellectual property rights and to individual privacy+-+615475883511ocn860882854art19970.10Hundley, Richard OEmerging Challenge: Security and Safety in Cyberspace11ocn855304968com20030.95Metrics for the Quadrennial Defense Review's operational goalsThe Department of Defense has adopted a capabilities-based approach to defense planning for transforming the U.S. military to meet newly emerging national security challenges. Capabilities-based planning focuses on developing the general wherewithal to fight successfully in a wide range of circumstances rather than only in stereotyped scenarios. The 2001 Quadrennial Defense Review highlighted what it called six specific operational goals for the focus of the transformation. It then sought metrics for evaluating, advancing, and monitoring progress in attaining those goals. This documented briefing contains the slides and text of a briefing that describes a first cut at identifying such metrics. The research reported here was conducted within the Acquisition and Technology Policy Center (ATPC) as part of RAND's Metrics for the QDR Transformation Operational Goals project, a cross-cutting effort sponsored by the advisory board of RAND's National Defense Research Institute (NDRI), a federally funded research and development center supported by the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the unified commands, and the defense agencies. The research reported here was conducted in early 2002, and results were presented to NDRI's advisory board in April 2002. This documented briefing should be of interest to those involved in defense planning, particularly as it relates to transforming the U.S. armed forces+-+736885883501ocn081533954book1993Cyberspace security and safety+-+8452758835+-+8452758835Fri Mar 21 15:16:53 EDT 2014batch27843