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Rand Corporation National Security Research Division

Overview
Works: 257 works in 495 publications in 1 language and 33,743 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings  Military history  Case studies 
Roles: Other, Editor
Classifications: UA835, 956.054
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Rand Corporation
 
Most widely held works by Rand Corporation
The Middle East in the shadow of Afghanistan and Iraq by F. Stephen Larrabee( )
4 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 1,773 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
On May 5-6, 2003, RAND and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy held a two-day conference in Geneva that examined the impact of the Iraq war on the security of the Middle East. It was attended by specialists from the United States, Europe, and the Middle East. This document summarizes the main issues and points of discussion at the conference: the impact of Iraq on the war on terrorism; the future of Iran and Iraq, repercussions of the war on Syria, the Levant, Turkey, Jordan, and the Arabian peninsula; and the effect of the war on transatlantic ties
In China's shadow regional perspectives on Chinese foreign policy and military development ( )
3 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1,730 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The papers in this collection were first presented at a conference on "Chinese Security Policy and the Future of Asia." The authors, each representing different countries and regions affected by the growth of Chinese power, were asked to address four major questions: (1) China's position in the present and future security environment of the given country or region; (2) principal sources of tension between China and the particular country or region; (3) prevailing opinion in the country or region toward China's efforts at military modernization; and (4) the principal political, security, and economic strategies for responding to China's emergent power and military role. The purpose was to reveal elements of commonality and difference in national strategies
Ready for takeoff China's advancing aerospace industry by Roger Cliff( )
6 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 1,641 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"China's aerospace industry has advanced at an impressive rate over the past decade. While some of this progress can be attributed to rapidly growing governmental support for China's aerospace sector, China's aerospace capabilities have also benefited from the increasing participation of its aerospace industry in the global commercial aerospace market and the supply chains of the world's leading aerospace firms. This monograph assesses China's aerospace capabilities and the extent to which China's participation in commercial aerospace markets and supply chains is contributing to the improvement of those capabilities. Specific areas assessed include China's commercial aviation manufacturing capabilities, its commercial and military capabilities in space, efforts of the Chinese government to encourage foreign participation in the development of the aerospace industry, transfers of foreign aerospace technology to China, the extent to which U.S. and other foreign aerospace firms are dependent on supplies from China, and the implications of all of these issues for U.S. security interests. The study should be of interest to business analysts, policymakers, lawmakers, and anyone who wishes to learn about China's market for commercial aviation, the capabilities of China's aerospace manufacturing industry, the role foreign aerospace firms are playing in the development of China's aerospace capabilities, and security implications for the United States. This research was sponsored by the U.S-China Economic and Security Review Commission, which was established by Congress in 2000 to monitor and report on the economic and national security dimensions of U.S. trade and economic ties with the People's Republic of China. This research was conducted within the International Security and Defense Policy Center of the RAND Corporation's National Security Research Division (NSRD). NSRD conducts research and analysis on defense and national security topics for the U.S. and allied defense, foreign policy, homeland security, and intelligence communities and foundations and other nongovernmental organizations that support defense and national security analysis."--Pref
Limited conflicts under the nuclear umbrella Indian and Pakistani lessons from the Kargil crisis by Ashley J Tellis( )
7 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 1,440 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report examines the views of India and Pakistan on the significance of Pakistan's foray into the Kargil-Dras sector in a limited war that has come to be known as the "Kargil conflict." The goal of the analysis is to assess both combatants' perceptions of the crisis, with a view to evaluating the possibilities of future Kargil-like events and the implications of the lessons each country learned for stability in South Asia. The analysis is based almost exclusively on Indian and Pakistani source materials. The Kargil crisis demonstrated that even the presence of nuclear weapons might not appreciably dampen security competition between the region's largest states. However, the question remains of whether or not the Kargil war represents a foretaste of future episodes of attempted nuclear coercion if India and Pakistan believe that their nuclear capabilities provide them the immunity required to prosecute a range of military operations short of all-out war
The radicalization of diasporas and terrorism a joint conference by the RAND Corporation and the Center for Security Studies, ETH Zurich by Bruce Hoffman( )
5 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 1,437 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Certain Diaspora communities, frustrated by a perceived war against the Muslim world, have turned against their adopted homelands, targeting the government and its people by supporting terrorist attacks against Western countries through recruitment, fundraising, and training. The problem is exacerbated by the open borders of globalization. Emerging threats must be identified without alienating Diaspora communities and thereby playing into terrorist hands
Building a more resilient Haitian state ( )
4 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 1,432 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Hope for a more prosperous and peaceful future for the Haitian people lies in building a more effective, resilient state. Haiti's state institutions are riddled with weaknesses in human resources, organization, procedures, and policies. State-building should be at the forefront of efforts to recover from the January 2010 earthquake. Devising lists of measures needed to repair the state's weaknesses is relatively easy, but formulating strategies to address those weaknesses is hard, and implementation is even harder. This report supports the development of a Haitian state-building strategy by identifying the main challenges to more capable governance, evaluating existing plans for strengthening government institutions and improving the delivery of public services, and proposing a realistic and carefully limited set of critical actions. The recommended priorities, in the areas of public administration, justice, security, economic policy, infrastructure, education, and health care, merit the greatest degree of Haiti's and international donors' policy attention and financial commitment
Evaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operations by Brian A Jackson( )
4 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 1,398 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The ability to measure emergency preparedness - to predict the likely performance of emergency response systems in future events - is critical for policy analysis in homeland security. Yet it remains difficult to know how prepared a response system is to deal with large-scale incidents, whether it be a natural disaster, terrorist attack, or industrial or transportation accident. This research draws on the fields of systems analysis and engineering to apply the concept of system reliability to the evaluation of emergency response systems. The authors describe a method for modeling an emergency response system; identifying how individual parts of the system might fail; and assessing the likelihood of each failure and the severity of its effects on the overall response effort. The authors walk the reader through two applications of this method: a simplified example in which responders must deliver medical treatment to a certain number of people in a specified time window, and a more complex scenario involving the release of chlorine gas. The authors also describe an exploratory analysis in which they parsed a set of after-action reports describing real-world incidents, to demonstrate how this method can be used to quantitatively analyze data on past response performance. The authors conclude with a discussion of how this method of measuring emergency response system reliability could inform policy discussion of emergency preparedness, how system reliability might be improved, and the costs of doing so. --From publisher description
Hired guns views about armed contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom ( )
4 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 1,377 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The use of armed private security contractors (PSCs) in the Iraq war has been unprecedented. Not only government agencies but also journalists, reconstruction contractors, and nongovernmental organizations frequently view them as a logical choice to fill their security needs, yet there have been a number of reports of PSCs committing serious, and sometimes fatal, abuses of power in Iraq. This study uses a systematic, empirically based survey of opinions of U.S. military and State Department personnel on the ground in Iraq to shed light on the following questions: To what extent are armed PSCs perceived to be imposing costs on the U.S. military effort? If so, are those costs tempered by positive contributions? How has the use of PSCs affected U.S. military operations in Operation Iraqi Freedom? While the military personnel did report some incidents of unnecessarily threatening, arrogant, or belligerent contractor behavior, the survey results indicate that neither the U.S. military nor State Department personnel appear to perceive PSCs to be "running wild" in Iraq. Moreover, respondents tended to consider PSCs a force multiplier rather than an additional strain on military troops, but both military and State Department respondents held mixed views regarding the contribution of armed contractors to U.S. foreign policy objectives."--Page 4 of cover
Commercial power centers in emerging markets by Gregory F Treverton( )
3 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1,359 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
As the ongoing Asian crises underscore, policymaking and policies are becoming less the exclusive purview of governments and more the outcome of a complex process in which diverse groups participate actively, with varying degrees of influence. A commercial power center (CPC) is any group, combination, or coalition that seeks to influence the design and implementation of government economic policies to suit its interests. This analytic framework is used to assess the changing politics of economic policymaking--to identify new groups with stakes and older ones that may be losing influence, and to evaluate their interaction in the making of government policy. The influence of selected CPCs in emerging markets matters for both what analysts look at and how they view those new targets. Asia's financial crisis, which struck as this project was in its final stages, drove home that lesson. The authors illustrate their methodology by examining four countries--Mexico, Turkey, China, and Indonesia--that are in transition and that vary widely from one another
Invisible wounds of war psychological and cognitive injuries, their consequences, and services to assist recovery by Terri L Tanielian( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1,329 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Since October 2001, approximately 1.64 million U.S. troops have been deployed for Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) in Afghanistan and Iraq. Early evidence suggests that the psychological toll of these deployments -- many involving prolonged exposure to combat-related stress over multiple rotations -- may be disproportionately high compared with the physical injuries of combat. In the face of mounting public concern over post-deployment health care issues confronting OEF/OIF veterans, several task forces, independent review groups, and a Presidential Commission have been convened to examine the care of the war wounded and make recommendations. Concerns have been most recently centered on two combat-related injuries in particular: post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. With the increasing incidence of suicide and suicide attempts among returning veterans, concern about depression is also on the rise. The study discussed in this monograph focuses on post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, and traumatic brain injury, not only because of current high-level policy interest but also because, unlike the physical wounds of war, these conditions are often invisible to the eye, remaining invisible to other servicemembers, family members, and society in general. All three conditions affect mood, thoughts, and behavior; yet these wounds often go unrecognized and unacknowledged. The effect of traumatic brain injury is still poorly understood, leaving a large gap in knowledge related to how extensive the problem is or how to address it. RAND conducted a comprehensive study of the post-deployment health-related needs associated with these three conditions among OEF/OIF veterans, the health care system in place to meet those needs, gaps in the care system, and the costs associated with these conditions and with providing quality health care to all those in need. This monograph presents the results of our study, which should be of interest to mental health treatment providers; health policymakers, particularly those charged with caring for our nation's veterans; and U.S. service men and women, their families, and the concerned public. All the research products from this study are available at http://veterans.rand.org. Data collection for this study began in April 2007and concluded in January 2008. Specific activities included a critical reviewof the extant literature on the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, and traumatic brain injury and their short- and long-term consequences; a population-based survey of service members and veterans who served in Afghanistan or Iraq to assess health status and symptoms, as well asutilization of and barriers to care; a review of existing programs to treat service members and veterans with the three conditions; focus groups withmilitary service members and their spouses; and the development of a microsimulation model to forecast the economic costs of these conditions overtime. Among our recommendations is that effective treatments documented in the scientific literature -- evidence-based care -- are available for PTSD and major depression. Delivery of such care to all veterans with PTSD or majordepression would pay for itself within two years, or even save money, by improving productivity and reducing medical and mortality costs. Such care may also be a cost-effective way to retain a ready and healthy military force for the future. However, to ensure that this care is delivered requires system-level changes across the Department of Defense, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the U.S. health care system
The People's Liberation Army as organization reference volume v 1.0 ( )
3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1,177 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Presents the results of a conference that brought together many of the nation's top experts to evaluate issues of structure and process in the People's Liberation Army
Imported oil and U.S. national security ( )
3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 1,076 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In 2007, on a net basis, the United States imported 58 percent of the oil it consumed. This book critically evaluates commonly suggested links between these oil imports and U.S. national security. The major risk to the United States posed by reliance on oil is the economic costs of a major disruption in global oil supplies. On the other hand, the study found no evidence that oil exporters have been able to use embargoes or threats of embargoes to achieve key political and foreign policy goals. Oil revenues are irrelevant for terrorist groups' ability to launch attacks. The study also assesses the economic, political, and military costs and benefits of potential policies to alleviate challenges to U.S. national security linked to imported oil. Of these measures, the adoption of the following energy policies by the U.S. government would most effectively reduce the costs to U.S. national security of importing oil: (1) Support well-functioning oil markets and refrain from imposing price controls or rationing during times of severe disruptions in supply. (2) Initiate a high-level review of prohibitions on exploring and developing new oil fields in restricted areas in order to provide policymakers and stakeholders with up-to-date and unbiased information on both economic benefits and environmental risks from relaxing those restrictions. (3) Ensure that licensing and permitting procedures and environmental standards for developing and producing oil and oil substitutes are clear, efficient, balanced in addressing both costs and benefits, and transparent. (4) Impose an excise tax on oil to increase fuel economy and soften growth in demand for oil. (5) Provide more U.S. government funding for research on improving the efficiency with which the U.S. economy uses oil and competing forms of energy
Chasing the dragon assessing China's system of export controls for WMD-related goods and technologies by Evan S Medeiros( )
3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 1,038 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
China's export controls on sensitive equipment, materials, and technologies used to produce weapons of mass destruction (WMD) have evolved significantly since the early 1980s. This monograph examines the structure and operation of the Chinese government's system of controls on exports of items that could be used in the production of WMD and WMD-related delivery systems. The author identifies the key organizations involved in export control decisionmaking, the laws and regulations that form the basis of the Chinese government's system of controls, and the interactions among government organizations involved in vetting sensitive exports. The author assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the system's ability to implement and enforce government export controls and identifies several challenges that the Chinese government currently faces in improving the current functioning of its nascent export control system
The lessons of Mumbai by Angel Rabasa( )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 936 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"This study of the Mumbai, India, terrorist attack of November 2008 identifies the operational and tactical capabilities displayed by the terrorists and evaluates the response of the Indian security forces. The authors draw out the implications of the incident for India, Pakistan, and the international community and derive lessons learned from the attack and from the Indian response. Their goal is to develop findings that may help counterterrorism authorities in India and elsewhere to prepare for or counter future terrorist attacks on urban centers."--Page 4 of cover
Saudi-Iranian relations since the fall of Saddam rivalry, cooperation, and implications for U.S. policy by Frederic M Wehrey( )
3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 917 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The often tense relationship between Saudi Arabia and Iran has been at the center of many of the major political shifts that have occurred in the Middle East since the fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003. This volume documents a study of how relations between the two powers have unfolded in the Persian Gulf, Iraq, Lebanon, and Palestine from 2003 through January 2009. Wehrey et al. detail the complex and multidimensional relationship between Saudi Arabia and Iran and its implications for regional stability and U.S. interests. In doing so, the authors challenge conventional thinking about Saudi-Iranian relations, arguing, for example, that Sunni-Shi'a distinctions are not the key driver in dealings between the two nations, that the two states have a tendency to engage on areas of common interest, and that the notion of a watertight bloc of Gulf Arab states opposing Iran is increasingly unrealistic. The study concludes with U.S. policy recommendations for leveraging the Saudi-Iranian relationship, particularly in the context of a U.S. drawdown in Iraq, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and the Iranian nuclear issue
Using social media to gauge Iranian public opinion and mood after the 2009 election by Sara Beth Elson( )
2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 799 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In the months after the contested Iranian presidential election in June 2009, Iranians used Twitter--a social media service that allows users to send short text messages, called tweets, with relative anonymity--to speak out about the election and the protests and other events that followed it. The authors of this report used an automated content analysis program called Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count 2007 (LIWC) to analyze more than 2.5 million tweets discussing the Iran election that were sent in the nine months following it. The authors (1) identify patterns in word usage over the nine-month period and (2) examine whether these patterns coincided with political events, to gain insight into how people may have felt before, during, and after those events. For example, they compare how the frequencies with which negative sentiments were directed toward President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, his election opponents, and President Barack Obama changed over time, and they track the way in which the use of swear words sharply increased in the days leading up to specific protests. Particularly in countries where freedom of expression is limited, automated analysis of social media appears to hold promise for such policy uses as assessing public opinion or outreach efforts and forecasting events such as large-scale protests.--Publisher description
The Muslim Brotherhood, its youth, and implications for U.S. engagement by Jeffrey Martini( )
3 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 494 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Since the January 25 Revolution of 2011 that ousted Hosni Mubarak, the Muslim Brotherhood (MB) has emerged as a legal entity operating the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP). That party won a strong plurality in the 2011-2012 parliamentary elections as well as claiming the presidency. But while the group was one of the primary beneficiaries of the revolution, its future is clouded by serious generational divides within the organization. The MB is led by an aged leadership whose formative experience was the mihna (ordeal) of the 1960's when the state tried to stamp out the Islamist movement. This hardened the group's leaders and put a premium on secrecy and organizational security. Although individuals under the age of 35 make up a large share of the MB's membership, their participation is modeled on the principle of "listen and obey." This overbearing hierarchy has already led to splits within the MB and will continue to present challenges going forward. These youth merit attention not only as a challenge to the Brotherhood's organizational cohesion, but also as a potential conduit for expanding U.S. engagement with the group. This study presents several recommendations on how the United States can incorporate MB youth into engagement efforts, including understanding but not gaming divisions in the organization, expanding engagement beyond a handful of MB senior leaders, leveraging existing outreach programs to include MB youth, and cultivating leadership buy-in for youth engagement efforts."
Moving toward the future of policing ( )
4 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 436 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Some police forces believe that 20 years from now they will operate much as they do today, but advances in technology and operating concepts are driving significant changes in day-to-day police operations. This book explores potential visions of the future of policing, based on the drivers of jurisdiction, technology, and threat, and includes concrete steps for implementation. This analysis is based on a review of policing methods and theories from the 19th century to the present day. Recommendations include educating personnel and leaders to build internal support for change, transitioning to shared technical platforms, and leveraging winning technologies. Because criminals will also use new technology that becomes available, the key to the future of policing will not be the technology itself; it will be the ways in which police forces adapt the technology to their needs
Overcoming obstacles to peace : local factors in nation-building by James Dobbins( )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 417 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"This volume analyzes the impediments that local conditions pose to successful outcomes of nation-building interventions in conflict-affected areas. Previous RAND studies of nation-building focused on external interveners' activities. This volume shifts the focus to internal circumstances, first identifying the conditions that gave rise to conflicts or threatened to perpetuate them, and then determining how external and local actors were able to modify or work around them to promote enduring peace. It examines in depth six varied societies: Cambodia, El Salvador, Bosnia and Herzegovina, East Timor, Sierra Leone, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It then analyzes a larger set of 20 major post-Cold War nation-building interventions. The authors assess the risk of renewed conflict at the onset of the interventions and subsequent progress along five dimensions: security, democratization, government effectiveness, economic growth, and human development. They find that transformation of many of the specific conditions that gave rise to or fueled conflict often is not feasible in the time frame of nation-building operations but that such transformation has not proven essential to achieving the primary goal of nation-building -- establishing peace. Most interventions in the past 25 years have led to enduring peace, as well as some degree of improvement in the other dimensions assessed. The findings suggest the importance of setting realistic expectations -- neither expecting nation-building operations to quickly lift countries out of poverty and create liberal democracies, nor being swayed by a negative stereotype of nation-building that does not recognize its signal achievements in the great majority of cases."--Page 4 of cover
Libya's post-Qaddafi transition the nation-building challenge ( )
4 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 386 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A year after Qaddafi's death, the light-footprint approach adopted for Libya's postwar transition is facing its most serious test. Security, the political transition, and economic development all present challenges. The security situation requires immediate attention and could worsen still. Until the militias are brought under state control, progress on other fronts will be very difficult to achieve. In most cases, the appropriate approach is a combination of incentives and broad-based negotiation between Tripoli and militia leaders. Only in extreme cases should the use of force be considered. On the political front, Libya and international actors deserve credit for the successful elections in July, but the political challenges ahead are significant. Libya still needs to write a constitution, and in doing so, it must determine the degree to which power is centralized in Tripoli and how to ensure inclusive yet stable governing institutions. Libya also needs to begin rethinking the management of its economy, and especially of its energy resources, to maximize the benefit to its citizens, reduce corruption, and enable private enterprise to flourish in other areas, such as tourism. Libya also needs sustained assistance, mainly technical in nature, from the countries that helped oust Qaddafi lest the transition run off the rails. Despite its role in helping topple Qaddafi, NATO is absent from Libya today. A greater role for the alliance is worth exploring, for example training Libyan security officials and forces and providing technical assistance for security-sector reform. An international Friends of Libya conference on assistance to Libya is warranted. Post-conflict transitions normally span years, and Libya's will be no different. Nevertheless, if current challenges are handled adroitly, Libya could still emerge as a positive force for democratic stability in North Africa and a valuable partner against al-Qaeda
 
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Alternative Names
N.S.R.D.
National Security Research Division (Rand Corporation)
NSRD
RAND's National security research division
Languages
English (73)
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