WorldCat Identities

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 9,923 works in 12,945 publications in 1 language and 29,785 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks, manuals, etc  Periodicals  Classification 
Roles: Researcher
Classifications: E9.16:NRELTP-550-376432005-2, 500
Publication Timeline
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Publications about Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (U.S.) Publications about Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (U.S.)
Publications by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (U.S.) Publications by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (U.S.)
Most widely held works by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (U.S.)
Spent fuel transportation package response to the Baltimore Tunnel fire scenario final report by H. E Adkins ( )
4 editions published between 2006 and 2009 in English and held by 285 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
On July 18, 2001, a freight train carrying hazardous (non-nuclear) materials derailed and caught fire while passing through the Howard Street railroad tunnel in downtown Baltimore, Maryland. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), one of the agencies responsible for ensuring the safe transportation of radioactive materials in the United States, undertook an investigation of the train derailment and fire to determine the possible regulatory implications of this particular event for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel by railroad. Shortly after the accident occurred, the USNRC met with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB, the U.S. agency responsible for determining the cause of transportation accidents), to discuss the details of the accident and the ensuing fire. Following these discussions, the USNRC assembled a team of experts from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine the thermal conditions that existed in the Howard Street tunnel fire and analyze the effects of this fire on various spent fuel transportation package designs. The Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) code, developed by NIST, was used to determine the thermal environment present in the Howard Street tunnel during the fire. The FDS results were used as boundary conditions in the COBRA-SFS and ANSYS® computer codes to evaluate the thermal performance of different package designs. The staff concluded that larger transportation packages resembling the HOLTEC Model No. HI STAR 100 and TransNuclear Model No. TN-68 would withstand a fire with thermal conditions similar to those that existed in the Baltimore tunnel fire event with only minor damage to peripheral components. This is due to their sizable thermal inertia and design specifications in compliance with currently imposed regulatory requirements. The staff also concluded that some components of smaller transportation packages resembling the NAC Model No. LWT, despite placement within an ISO container, could degrade. USNRC staff evaluated the radiological consequences of the package responses to the Baltimore tunnel fire. Though components in some packages heated up beyond their service temperatures, the staff determined that there would be no significant dose as a result of the fire for any of these and similar packages
Information on hydrologic conceptual models, parameters, uncertainty analysis, and data sources for dose assessments at decommissioning sites by P. D Meyer ( )
4 editions published between 1999 and 2000 in English and held by 270 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report addresses issues related to the analysis of uncertainty in dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The basic conceptual models and mathematical implementations of three dose assessment codes are outlined along with the site-specific conditions under which the codes may provide inaccurate, potentially nonconservative results. In addition, the hydrologic parameters of the codes are identified and compared. A methodology for parameter uncertainty assessment is outlined that considers the potential data limitations and modeling needs of decommissioning analyses. This methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regional databases, sensitivity analysis, probabilistic modeling, and Bayesian updating to incorporate site-specific information. Data sources for best-estimate parameter values and parameter uncertainty information are also reviewed. A follow-on report will illustrate the uncertainty assessment methodology using decommissioning test cases
Tsunami hazard assessment at nuclear power plant sites in the United States of America final report by R Prasad ( )
3 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 266 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"We describe the tsunami phenomenon with the focus on its relevance for hazard assessment at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 includes an overview of tsunamis and mechanisms that generate tsunamis. Three tsunamigenic mechanisms--earthquakes, landslides, and volcanoes--are considered relevant for hazard assessment at nuclear power plant sites. We summarize historical tsunami occurrences, including descriptions of source mechanisms and damages caused by these events. Historical landslides and potential landslide areas in earth's oceans are described. We describe the hierarchical-review approach to tsunami-hazard assessment at nuclear power plant sites in Chapter 2. The hierarchical-review approach consists of a series of stepwise, progressively more-refined analyses to evaluate the hazard resulting from a phenomena at a nuclear power plant site. We recommend that the hierarchical review approach employ a screening analysis to determine if a site is subject to tsunami hazard based on the presence of a tsunamigenic source and the location and elevation of the site. The screening analysis is expected to ensure that analysis and review resources are not wasted at sites with little potential of exposure to tsunamis. Chapter 3 describes the effects tsunami waves may have at a nuclear power plant site. These effects result in hazards that may directly affect the safety of a plant's structures, systems, and components. Structures, systems, and components important to the safety of a plant should be adequately designed and, if required, protected from these hazards. Chapter 4 describes data required for a detailed tsunami-hazard assessment and sources of these data. We recommend using existing resources and previously completed tsunami-hazard assessments, if available and appropriate. Detailed tsunamihazard assessment at a nuclear power plant site should be based on the probable maximum tsunami. Chapter 5 defines the probable maximum tsunami, its determination at a site, and subsequent hazard assessment. We point out that a tsunamigenic source that produces probable maximum tsunami hazards at a site may not be determined a priori. It may be necessary to evaluate several candidate sources and the tsunamis generated from them under the most favorable tsunamigenic source and ambient conditions. The set of hazards obtained from all such scenario tsunamis should be considered to determine design bases of the plant structures, systems, and components. Chapter 6 describes international practices by Japan and the International Atomic Energy Agency, which are reviewed for completeness. The appendix provides a stepwise guide to site-independent analyses for tsunami-hazard assessment."
Radionuclide-chelating agent complexes in low-level radioactive decontamination waste; stability, adsorbtion [sic] and transport potential ( Book )
3 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 255 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Hydrologic uncertainty assessment for decommissioning sites hypothetical test case applications by P. D Meyer ( )
5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 254 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report uses hypothetical decommissioning test cases to illustrate an uncertainty assessment methodology for dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses (see NUREG/CR-6656). The hypothetical test case source term and scenarios are based on an actual decommissioning case and the physcial setting is based on the site of a field experiment carried out for the NRC in Arizona. The emphasis in the test case was on parameter uncertainty. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regiounal databases for estimating parameter uncertainty. A Bayesian updating method is used in one of the test case applications to combine site-specific information with the generic parameter distributions. Sensitivity analysis and probabilisitc siumlation are used to describe the impact of parameter uncertainty on predicted dose. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conceptual and computational behavior of the dose assessment codes as they are applied to the test cases. The primary code used in this application was RESRAD v.6.0 although DandD v.1.0 results are also reported. The methods presented and the issues discussed are applicable to other codes as well
Solubility and leaching of radionuclides in Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) slags ( )
2 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 252 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Evaluation of hydrologic uncertainty assessments for decommissioning sites using complex and simplified models by P. D Meyer ( )
2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 251 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Breakthroughs science, technology, innovation ( )
in English and held by 249 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Radioanalytical technology for 10 CFR part 61 and other selected radionuclides literature review by C. W Thomas ( )
3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 234 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A comprehensive literature review and assessment was conducted to identify and evaluate radioanalytical technology and procedures used for measuring 10CFR61 radionuclides and other long-lived isotopes. This review evaluated radiochemical procedures currently in use at a number of laboratories in the US, as well as identifying new advanced methods and techniques which could be adapted for routine radiochemical analyses of low-level radioactive waste. The 10CFR61 radionuclides include ¹⁴C, ⁶°Cl, {sup 59,63}Ni, ⁹°Sr, ⁹⁴Nb, ⁹⁹Tc, ¹²⁹I, ¹³⁷Cs, and TRU isotopes with half lives greater than 5 years. Other low-level radionuclides of interest include {sup 7,10}Be, ²⁶Al, ³⁶Cl, ⁹³Mo, {sup 109,113m}Cd, and {sup 121m,126}Sn, which may be present in various types of waste streams from nuclear power stations
Uncertainty analyses of infiltration and subsurface flow and transport for SDMP sites by P. D Meyer ( )
2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 231 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff have identified a number of sites requiring special attention in the decommissioning process because of elevated levels of radioactive contaminants. Traits common to many of these sites include limited data characterizing the subsurface, the presence of long-lived radionuclides necessitating a long-term analysis (1,000 years or more), and potential exposure through multiple pathways. As a consequence of these traits, the uncertainty in predicted exposures can be significant. In addition, simplifications to the physical system and the transport mechanisms are often necessary to reduce the computational requirements of the analysis. Several multiple-pathway transport codes exist for estimating dose, two of which were used in this study. These two codes have built-in Monte Carlo simulation capabilities that were used for the uncertainty analysis. Several tools for improving uncertainty analyses of exposure estimates through the groundwater pathway have been developed and are discussed in this report. Generic probability distributions for unsaturated and saturated zone soil hydraulic parameters are presented. A method is presented to combine the generic distributions with site-specific water retention data using a Bayesian analysis. The resulting updated soil hydraulic parameter distributions can be used to obtain an updated estimate of the probability distribution of dose. The method is illustrated using a hypothetical decommissioning site
Low-level radioactive waste classification, characterization, and assessment waste streams and neutron-activated metals ( )
2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 231 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A generalized procedure for generating flaw-related inputs for the FAVOR code by F. A Simonen ( )
3 editions published between 2004 and 2013 in English and held by 221 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Revised analyses of decommissioning reference non-fuel-cycle-facilities ( )
3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 206 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of ³H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of ¹⁴C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of ¹²³I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of ¹³⁷Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of ²⁴¹Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a facility, DECON requires that contaminated components either be: (1) decontaminated to restricted or unrestricted release levels or (2) packaged and shipped to an authorized disposal site. This study considers unrestricted release only. The new decommissioning criteria of July 1997 are too recent for this study to include a cost analysis of the restricted release option, which is now allowed under these new criteria. The costs of decommissioning facility components are generally estimated to be in the range of $140 to $27,000, depending on the type of component, the type and amount of radioactive contamination, the remediation options chosen, and the quantity of radioactive waste generated from decommissioning operations. Estimated costs for decommissioning the example laboratories range from $130,000 to $205,000, assuming aggressive low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction. If only minimal LLW volume reduction is employed, decommissioning costs range from $150,000 to $270,000 for these laboratories. On the basis of estimated decommissioning costs for facility components, the costs of decommissioning typical non-fuel-cycle laboratory facilities are estimated to range from about $25,000 for the decommissioning of a small room containing one or two fume hoods to more than $1 million for the decommissioning of an industrial plant containing several laboratories in which radiochemicals and sealed radioactive sources are prepared. For the reference sites of this study, the basic decommissioning alternatives are: (1) site stabilization followed by long-term care and (2) removal of the waste or contaminated soil to an authorized disposal site. Cost estimates made for decommissioning three reference sites range from about $130,000 for the removal of a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank to more than $23 million for the removal of a tailings pile that contains radioactive residue from ore-processing operations in which tin slag is processed for the recovery of rare metals. Total occupational radiation doses generally range from 0.00007 person-rem to 13 person-rem for decommissioning the laboratory facilities of this study. The results of this study are: (1) decommissioning costs have continued to increase since publication of the original study, due primarily to rapidly escalating costs for disposal of radioactive wastes at the available LLW burial sites; (2) these swiftly increasing LLW disposal costs provide a significant incentive for NRC licensees to effectively manage LLW generation, treatment, and disposal from decommissioning activities; and (3) decommissioning costs have increased on the order of 34% to 66% since the Final Decommissioning Rule was issued in 1988, due in large part to the 3.5-fold increase in burial costs
GridWise standards mapping overview by Mia L Bosquet ( )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 200 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
''GridWise'' is a concept of how advanced communications, information and controls technology can transform the nation's energy system--across the spectrum of large scale, central generation to common consumer appliances and equipment--into a collaborative network, rich in the exchange of decision making information and an abundance of market-based opportunities (Widergren and Bosquet 2003) accompanying the electric transmission and distribution system fully into the information and telecommunication age. This report summarizes a broad review of standards efforts which are related to GridWise--those which could ultimately contribute significantly to advancements toward the GridWise vision, or those which represent today's current technological basis upon which this vision must build
Builders and buyers handbook for improving new home efficiency, comfort, and durability in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates ( )
4 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 189 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Builders and buyers handbook for improving new home efficiency, comfort, and durability in the hot and humid climate by M. C Baechler ( )
3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 189 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Builders and buyers handbook for improving new home efficiency, comfort, and durability in the marine climate by M. C Baechler ( )
2 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 186 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Builders and buyers handbook for improving new home efficiency, comfort, and durability in the mixed-humid climate ( )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 186 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the mixed-humid climate region. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team--from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder
Builders and buyers handbook for improving new home efficiency, comfort, and durability in cold and very cold climates ( )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 186 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identity Pacific Northwest Laboratory

PNNL
United States. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Languages
English (66)