WorldCat Identities

World Bank Social Development

Overview
Works: 113 works in 138 publications in 1 language and 545 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Case studies 
Classifications: HG3881.5.W57, 362.509598
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Most widely held works about World Bank
 
Most widely held works by World Bank
Social capital, household welfare and poverty in Indonesia by Christiaan Grootaert( Book )

5 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 73 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It pays for poor households to participate actively in local associations. At low incomes, the returns to social capital are higher than returns to human capital. At higher incomes, the reverse is true
Poverty correlates and indicator-based targeting in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union by Christiaan Grootaert( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Local institutions, poverty and household welfare in Bolivia by Christiaan Grootaert( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Poverty correlates and indicator-based targeting in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union by Christiaan Grootaert( Book )

4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

July 1998 Social protection systems in the transition economies have been inadequate to meet the challenges of transition, being both costly and poorly targeted. The largest group of poor people is the working poor-especially workers with little education (primary education or less) or outdated vocational or technical education. Grootaert and Braithwaite compare poverty in three Eastern European countries (Bulgaria, Hungary, and Poland) with poverty in three countries of the former Soviet Union (Estonia, Kyrgyz Republic, and Russia). They find striking differences between the post-Soviet and Eastern European experiences with poverty and targeting. Among patterns detected: * Poverty in Eastern Europe is significantly lower than in former Soviet Union countries. * Rural poverty is greater than urban poverty. * In Eastern Europe there is a strong correlation between poverty incidence and the number of children in a household; in the former Soviet Union countries this is less pronounced, except in Russia. * There is a gender and age dimension to poverty in some countries. In single-person households, especially of elderly women, the poverty rate is very high (except in Poland) and poverty is more severe. The same is true in pensioner households (except in Poland). In Poland the pension system has adequate reach. * Poverty rates are highest among people who have lost their connection with the labor market and live on social transfers (other than pensions) or other nonearned income. But through sheer mass, the largest group of poor people is the working poor-especially workers with little education (primary education or less) or outdated vocational or technical education. Only those with special skills or university education escape poverty in great numbers, thanks to the demand for their skills from the newly emerging private sector. * The poverty gap is remarkably uniform in Eastern European countries, especially Hungary and Poland, suggesting that social safety nets have prevented the emergence of deep pockets of poverty. This is much less true in the former Soviet Union, where those with the highest poverty rate also have the largest poverty gap. In the short to medium term, creating employment in the informal sector will generate a larger payoff than creating jobs in the formal (still to be privatized) sector, so programs to help (prospective) entrepreneurs should take center stage in poverty alleviation programs. This paper is a joint product of the Social Development Department and Europe and Central Asia, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Sector Unit. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project Poverty and Targeting of Social Assistance in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union (RPO 680-33). The authors may be contacted at cgrootaert@worldbank.org or jbraithwaite@worldbank.org
Child labor in Côte d'Ivoire : incidence and determinants by Christiaan Grootaert( Book )

3 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

March 1998 Most children in Côte d'Ivoire perform some kind of work. In rural areas, more than four of five children work, with only a third combining work with schooling. Child labor in Côte d'Ivoire increased in the 1980s because of a severe economic crisis. Two out of three urban children aged 7 to 17 work; half of them also attend school. In rural areas, more than four out of five children work, but only a third of them manage to combine work with schooling. Full-time work is less prevalent, but not negligible. Roughly 7 percent of urban children work full time (an average 46 hours a week). More than a third of rural children work full time (an average of 35 hours a week), with the highest incidence in the Savannah region. The incidence of such full-time work rises with age but is by no means limited to older children. The average age of the full-time child worker in Côte d'Ivoire is 12.7. These children have received an average 1.2 years of schooling. That child is also more likely to be ill or injured and is less likely to receive medical attention than other children. Urban children in the interior cities are far more likely to work and their working hours are much longer. Among rural children, those in the Savannah region (where educational infrastructure lags far behind the rest of the country) are most likely to work. Five factors affect a household's decision to supply child labor: * The age and gender of the child (girls are more likely to work, especially when the head of household is a woman). * The education and employment status of the parents (low parental education is a good targeting variable for interventions). * The availability of within-household employment opportunities. * The household's poverty status. * The household's location (calling for geographical targeting). With improved macroeconomic growth, it is hoped, child labor will decline-but a significant decline could take several generations. Meanwhile, it is important to: * Use a gradual approach toward the elimination of child work by aiming initial interventions at facilitating combined work and schooling. * Support the development of home enterprises as part of poverty alleviation programs, but combine it with incentives for school attendance. * Make school hours and vacation periods flexible (accommodating harvest times) in rural areas. This would also improve children's health. * Improve rural school attendance by having a school in the village rather than 1 to 5 kilometers away. * Improve educational investment in the Savannah. This paper is a product of the Social Development Department. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project Child Labor: What Role for Demand-Side Interventions (RPO 680-64). The author may be contacted at cgrootaert@worldbank.org
Local institutions, poverty and household welfare in Bolivia by Christiaan Grootaert( Book )

4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

July 2001 Social capital--including membership in an association such as an agrarian syndicate--reduces the probability of being poor in Bolivia. The returns to household investment in social capital are generally greater for the poor than for the rich, and greater for households with little land than for those with more land. Returns to such membership for Bolivia's poorest exceed returns to education and other assets. Grootaert and Narayan empirically estimate the impact of social capital on household welfare in Bolivia - where they found 67 different types of local associations. They focus on household memberships in local associations as being especially relevant to daily decisions that affect household welfare and consumption. On average, households belong to 1.4 groups and associations: 62 percent belong to agrarian syndicates, 16 percent to production groups, 13 percent to social service groups, and 10 percent to education and health groups. Smaller numbers belong to religious and government groups. Agrarian syndicates, created by government decree in 1952, are now viewed mainly as community-initiated institutions to manage communal resources. They have been registered as legal entities to work closely with municipalities to represent the interests and priorities of local people in municipal decisionmaking. The effects of social capital operate through (at least) three mechanisms: sharing of information among association members; the reduction of opportunistic behavior; and better collective decisionmaking. The effect of social capital on household welfare was found to be 2.5 times that of human capital. Increasing the average educational endowment of each adult in the household by one year (about a 25-percent increase) would increase per capita household spending 4.2 percent; a similar increase in the social capital endowment would increase spending 9 to 10.5 percent. They measured social capital along six dimensions: density of memberships, internal heterogeneity of associations (by gender, age, education, religion, etc.), meeting attendance, active participation in decisionmaking, payment of dues (in cash and in kind), and community orientation. The strongest effect came from number of memberships. Active membership in an agrarian syndicate is associated with an average 11.5 percent increase in household spending. Membership in another local association is associated with a 5.3-percent higher spending level. Empirical results partly confirm the hypothesis that social capital provides long-term benefits such as better access to credit and a higher level of trust in the community as a source of assistance in case of need. This paper--a joint product of the Social Development Department and the Poverty Division, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network--is part of a larger effort in the Bank to understand better the role of local institutions, and social capital in general, for poverty reduction. The authors may be contacted at cgrootaert@worldbank.org or dnarayan@worldbank.org
Africa Regional Seminar on Participatory Budgeting : strengthening budget transparency, participation, and independent oversight : March 10-14, 2008, Durban, South Africa : proceedings of the workshop by Participation, and Independent Oversight Africa Regional Seminar on Participatory Budgeting: Strengthening Budget Transparency( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Children, education and war : reaching Education for All (EFA) objectives in countries affected by conflict by Marc Sommers( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Getting things done in an anti-modern society : social capital networks in Russia by Richard Rose( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Educational change in Latin America and the Caribbean( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Initiative on defining, monitoring and measuring social capital : overview and program description( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Drugs and development in Afghanistan by William Byrd( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Social capital and poverty by Paul Collier( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Social capital, growth and poverty : a survey of cross-country evidence by Stephen F Knack( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Participatory country assistance strategy in Colombia : a case study by Jairo Arboleda( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

BPXC's operations in Casanare, Colombia : factoring social concerns into development decisionmaking by Aidan Davy( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Social assessment of the Azerbaijan national environmental action plan : a focus on community responses to the Caspian Sea environmental disaster by Ayșe Kudat( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New paths to social development : community and global networks in action by World Summit for Social Development and Beyond: Achieving Social Development for All in a Globalizing World( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A guide for local benefit sharing in hydropower projects by Chaogang Wang( Book )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityWorld Bank. Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development Network

Social development department

World Bank Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development Network Social Development

World Bank Social development department

Languages
English (38)