WorldCat Identities

Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Board on Global Health

Overview
Works: 59 works in 154 publications in 1 language and 29,223 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Software 
Roles: Other, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Institute of Medicine (U.S.).
Globalization, biosecurity, and the future of the life sciences by National Research Council of the National Academies( Book )

7 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 238 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Learning from SARS : preparing for the next disease outbreak : workshop summary by Alison Mack( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 223 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The report examines the response to SARS by public health systems within individual countries; the biology of the SARS coronavirus and related coronaviruses in animals; the economic and political fallout of the SARS epidemic; quarantine law and other public health measures that apply to combating infectious diseases; and the role of international organizations and scientific cooperation in halting the spread of SARS. The report provides an illuminating survey of findings from the epidemic, along with an assessment of what might be needed in order to contain any future outbreaks of SARS or other emerging infections
Emerging infectious diseases from the global to the local perspective : a summary of a workshop of the Forum on Emerging Infections by Jonathan R Davis( Book )

3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 222 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

And Assessment -- Introduction -- Emerging infections in Latin America -- Emerging infections in Africa -- Emerging infections in Asia and the Pacific -- Emerging infections in Europe -- References -- Appendixes
The impact of globalization on infectious disease emergence and control : exploring the consequences and opportunities : workshop summary by Stacey Knobler( Book )

7 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 150 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report of a workshop by the Forum on Microbial Threats which explored the impact of increasingly integrated trade, economic development, human movement, and cultural exchange on patters of disease emergence; identified opportunities for countering the effects of globalization on infectious diseases; examined the scientific evidence supporting current and potential global strategies; and considered newly available response methods and tools available for use by private industry, public health agencies, regulatory agencies, policy makers, and academic researcher
Antibiotic resistance : implications for global health and novel intervention strategies : workshop summary by Eileen R Choffnes( Book )

6 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 125 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For decades it seemed as if modern medicine had conquered many of the infectious diseases that once threatened human and animal health. But years of using, misusing, and overusing antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs have led to the emergence of multidrug-resistant "superbugs." Some strains of bacteria and viruses are now resistant to all but a single drug, while others have no effective treatments at all. The IOM's Forum on Microbial Threats held a public workshop April 6-7 to discuss the nature and sources of drug-resistant bacteria and viruses and their implications for global health. Speakers explored the evolutionary, genetic, and ecological origins of antimicrobial drug resistance and its effects on human and animal health worldwide. Participants discussed the causes of drug resistance; strategies for extending the life of antimicrobial drugs; alternative approaches for treating infections; incentives and disincentives for prudent antimicrobial drug use; and prospects for the next generation of antimicrobial treatments. This document summarizes the workshop
Violence prevention in low and middle income countries : finding a place on the global agenda : workshop summary by Institute of Medicine (U.S.)( Book )

5 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Design considerations for evaluating the impact of PEPFAR : workshop summary by Institute of Medicine (U.S.)( Book )

5 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 95 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Design Considerations for Evaluating the Impact of PEPFAR" is the summary of a 2-day workshop on methodological, policy, and practical design considerations for a future evaluation of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) interventions carried out under the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), which was convened by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) on April 30 and May 1, 2007. Participants at the workshop included staff of the U.S. Congress; PEPFAR officials and implementers; major multilateral organizations such as The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis (The Global Fund), the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), and the World Bank; representatives from international nongovernmental organizations; experienced evaluation experts; and, representatives of partner countries, particularly the PEPFAR focus countries. The workshop represented a final element of the work of the congressionally mandated IOM Committee for the Evaluation of PEPFAR Implementation, which published a report of its findings in 2007 evaluating the first 2 years of implementation, but could not address longer term impact evaluation questions
Country-level Decision Making for Control of Chronic Diseases : workshop summary by Alexandra S Beatty( Book )

5 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 73 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A 2010 IOM report, Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World, found that not only is it possible to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease and related chronic diseases in developing countries, but also that such a reduction will be critical to achieving global health and development goals. As part a series of follow-up activities to the 2010 report, the IOM held a workshop that aimed to identify what is needed to create tools for country-led planning of effective, efficient, and equitable provision of chronic disease control programs."--Publisher's description
Mitigating the nutritional impacts of the global food price crisis : workshop summary by Elizabeth Haytmanek( Book )

5 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2007 and 2008, the world witnessed a dramatic increase in food prices. The global financial crisis that began in 2008 compounded the burden of high food prices, exacerbating the problems of hunger and malnutrition in developing countries. The tandem food price and economic crises struck amidst the massive, chronic problem of hunger and undernutrition in developing countries. National governments and international actors have taken a variety of steps to mitigate the negative effects of increased food prices on particular groups. The recent abrupt increase in food prices, in tandem with the current global economic crisis, threatens progress already made in these areas, and could inhibit future efforts. The Institute of Medicine held a workshop, summarized in this volume, to describe the dynamic technological, agricultural, and economic issues contributing to the food price increases of 2007 and 2008 and their impacts on health and nutrition in resource-poor regions. The compounding effects of the current global economic downturn on nutrition motivated additional discussions on these dual crises, their impacts on the nutritional status of vulnerable populations, and opportunities to mitigate their negative nutritional effects
Interprofessional education for collaboration : learning how to improve health from interprofessional models across the continuum of education to practice : workshop summary by Patricia A Cuff( Book )

4 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 65 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Every year, the Global Forum undertakes two workshops whose topics are selected by the more than 55 members of the Forum. It was decided in this first year of the Forum's existence that the workshops should lay the foundation for future work of the Forum and the topic that could best provide this base of understanding was "interprofessional education." The first workshop took place August 29-30, 2012, and the second was on November 29-30, 2012. Both workshops focused on linkages between interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice. The difference between them was that Workshop 1 set the stage for defining and understanding IPE while Workshop 2 brought in speakers from around the world to provide living histories of their experience working in and between interprofessional education and interprofessional or collaborative practice"--Publisher's description
The cost of inaction for young children globally : workshop summary by Kimber Bogard( Book )

4 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Cost of Inaction for Young Children Globally is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine Forum on Investing in Young Children Globally in April 2014 to focus on investments in young children and the cost of inaction. Participants explored existing, new, and innovative science and research from around the world to translate this evidence into sound and strategic investments in policies and practices that will make a difference in the lives of children and their caregivers. This report discusses intersections across health, education, nutrition, living conditions, and social protection and how investments of economic, natural, social, and other resources can sustain or promote early childhood development and well-being"--Publisher's description
Achieving sustainable global capacity for surveillance and response to emerging diseases of zoonotic origin : workshop report by Institute of Medicine (U.S.)( Book )

6 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and National Research Council (NRC) convened a 2-day workshop titled "Workshop on Sustainable Global Capacity for Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonoses" in Washington, DC, on June 25 and 26, 2008. The goal of the workshop--as one of several planned data gathering sessions for the committee to meet their overall charge--was more narrowly focused to review the current global capacity to carry out surveillance to detect, report, and monitor emerging infectious diseases in both humans and animals. This included brief discussions that began to examine how these systems might inform the necessary responses to emerging and reemerging infectious diseases of zoonotic origin that would be discussed more in-depth in the committee's forthcoming consensus report. The workshop did not address, however, the details of any specific global or regional responses to any particular disease outbreak. The workshop did provide an opportunity for participants to examine the effectiveness of communication pathways among multidisciplinary practitioners and researchers, between the human and animal health constituencies, and between these professionals and the public. This document is a report of that workshop and is a companion to the full consensus report (anticipated for summer 2009) of the IOM/NRC Committee on Achieving Sustainable Capacity for Surveillance and Response to Emerging Diseases of Zoonotic Origin. For the complete study, the committee is charged with exploring how emerging zoonotic disease surveillance, prevention, detection, and response could be strengthened and sustained globally over time to reduce or eliminate outbreaks of zoonotic diseases in human populations."--Page ix-x
Evaluation design for complex global initiatives : workshop summary by Institute of Medicine( Book )

3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Every year, public and private funders spend many billions of dollars on large-scale, complex, multi-national health initiatives. The only way to know whether these initiatives are achieving their objectives is through evaluations that examine the links between program activities and desired outcomes. Investments in such evaluations, which, like the initiatives being evaluated, are carried out in some of the world's most challenging settings, are a relatively new phenomenon. In the last five years, evaluations have been conducted to determine the effects of some of the world's largest and most complex multi-national health initiatives. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine in January 2014 to explore these recent evaluation experiences and to consider the lessons learned from how these evaluations were designed, carried out, and used. The workshop brought together more than 100 evaluators, researchers in the field of evaluation science, staff involved in implementing large-scale health programs, local stakeholders in the countries where the initiatives are carried out, policy makers involved in the initiatives, representatives of donor organizations, and others to derive lessons learned from past large-scale evaluations and to discuss how to apply these lessons to future evaluations. This report discusses transferable insights gained across the spectrum of choosing the evaluator, framing the evaluation, designing the evaluation, gathering and analyzing data, synthesizing findings and recommendations, and communicating key messages. The report also explores the relative benefits and limitations of different quantitative and qualitative approaches within the mixed methods designs used for these complex and costly evaluations"--Publisher's description
Building health workforce capacity through community-based health professional education : workshop summary by Patricia A Cuff( Book )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"There is growing evidence from developed and developing countries that community-based approaches are effective in improving the health of individuals and populations. This is especially true when the social determinants of health are considered in the design of the community-based approach. With an aging population and an emphasis on health promotion, the United States is increasingly focusing on community-based health and health care. Preventing disease and promoting health calls for a holistic approach to health interventions that rely more heavily upon interprofessional collaborations. However, the financial and structural design of health professional education remains siloed and largely focused on academic health centers for training. Despite these challenges, there are good examples of interprofessional, community-based programs and curricula for educating health professionals. In May 2014, members of the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education came together to substantively delve into issues affecting the scale-up and spread of health professional education in communities. Participants heard a wide variety of individual accounts from innovators about work they are undertaking and opportunities for education with communities. In presenting a variety of examples that range from student community service to computer modeling, the workshop aimed to stimulate discussions about how educators might better integrate education with practice in communities. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education summarizes the presentations and discussion of this event."--Publisher's description
The social biology of microbial communities : workshop summary by Institute of Medicine (U.S.)( Book )

3 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Beginning with the germ theory of disease in the 19th century and extending through most of the 20th century, microbes were believed to live their lives as solitary, unicellular, disease-causing organisms . This perception stemmed from the focus of most investigators on organisms that could be grown in the laboratory as cellular monocultures, often dispersed in liquid, and under ambient conditions of temperature, lighting, and humidity. Most such inquiries were designed to identify microbial pathogens by satisfying Koch's postulates This pathogen-centric approach to the study of microorganisms produced a metaphorical "war" against these microbial invaders waged with antibiotic therapies, while simultaneously obscuring the dynamic relationships that exist among and between host organisms and their associated microorganisms only a tiny fraction of which act as pathogens. Despite their obvious importance, very little is actually known about the processes and factors that influence the assembly, function, and stability of microbial communities. Gaining this knowledge will require a seismic shift away from the study of individual microbes in isolation to inquiries into the nature of diverse and often complex microbial communities, the forces that shape them, and their relationships with other communities and organisms, including their multicellular hosts. On March 6 and 7, 2012, the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a public workshop to explore the emerging science of the "social biology" of microbial communities. Workshop presentations and discussions embraced a wide spectrum of topics, experimental systems, and theoretical perspectives representative of the current, multifaceted exploration of the microbial frontier. Participants discussed ecological, evolutionary, and genetic factors contributing to the assembly, function, and stability of microbial communities; how microbial communities adapt and respond to environmental stimuli; theoretical and experimental approaches to advance this nascent field; and potential applications of knowledge gained from the study of microbial communities for the improvement of human, animal, plant, and ecosystem health and toward a deeper understanding of microbial diversity and evolution. The Social Biology of Microbial Communities: Workshop Summary further explains the happenings of the workshop."--Publisher's description
Establishing transdisciplinary professionalism for improving health outcomes : workshop summary by Patricia A Cuff( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Establishing Transdisciplinary Professionalism for Improving Health Outcomes is a summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore the possibility of whether different professions can come together and whether a dialogue with society on professionalism is possible. Most of the 59 members making up the Global Forum were present at the workshop and engaged with outside participants in active dialogue around issues related to professionalism and how the different professions might work effectively together and with society in creating a social contract. The structure of the workshop involved large plenary discussions, facilitated table conversations, and small-group breakout sessions. In this way, the members - representing multiple sectors, countries, health professions, and educational associations - had numerous opportunities to share their own perspectives on transdisciplinary professionalism as well as hear the opinions of subject matter experts and the general public. Efforts to improve patient care and population health are traditional tenets of all the health professions, as is a focus on professionalism. But in a time of rapidly changing environments and evolving technologies, health professionals and those who train them are being challenged to work beyond their traditional comfort zones, often in teams. A new professionalism might be a mechanism for achieving improved health outcomes by applying a transdisciplinary professionalism throughout health care and wellness that emphasizes crossdisciplinary responsibilities and accountability. Establishing Transdisciplinary Professionalism for Improving Health Outcomes discusses how shared understanding can be integrated into education and practice, ethical implications of and barriers to transdisciplinary professionalism, and the impact of an evolving professional context on patients, students, and others working within the health care system"--Publisher's description
Fungal diseases : an emerging threat to human, animal, and plant health : workshop summary by Institute of Medicine (U.S.)( )

4 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Fungal diseases have contributed to death and disability in humans, triggered global wildlife extinctions and population declines, devastated agricultural crops, and altered forest ecosystem dynamics. Despite the extensive influence of fungi on health and economic well-being, the threats posed by emerging fungal pathogens to life on Earth are often underappreciated and poorly understood. On December 14 and 15, 2010, the IOM's Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a public workshop to explore the scientific and policy dimensions associated with the causes and consequences of emerging fungal diseases."--Publisher's description
Addressing foodborne threats to health : policies, practices, and global coordination by Institute of Medicine (U.S.)( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In December 2004, at a press conference called to announce his departure as Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Tommy Thompson raised both concern and controversy when he remarked that he could not understand why terrorists had not yet attacked our food supply "because it is so easy to do." Three days later, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the last in a series of four food safeguards mandated under the Biopreparedness Act of 2002. Although these provisions improve the FDA's ability to intercept and track the origins of food that is suspected to pose a threat to health, they cannot prevent contamination. Biological and chemical agents can be--and have been--introduced, both accidentally and deliberately, at many vulnerable points along the farm-to-table food chain. Foodborne agents have been estimated to cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,200 deaths in the United States each year. More than 250 different foodborne diseases, including both infections and poisonings, have been described, according to the CDC. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates costs associated with medical expenses and losses in productivity due to missed work and premature deaths from five major types of foodborne illnesses (Campylobacter, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shiga toxinproducing strains of E. coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella) at $6.9 billion annually. This figure likely represents the tip of the iceberg, as it does not account for the broad spectrum of foodborne illnesses or for their wide-ranging repercussions for consumers, government, and the food industry. The potential impact on human health of deliberate adulteration of food can be estimated by extrapolation from the many documented examples of unintentional outbreaks of foodborne disease, some of which have sickened hundreds of thousands of people and killed hundreds. Given the wide variety of potential chemical and biological adulterants that can be introduced at many vulnerable points along the food supply continuum, contaminating food is perhaps one of the easiest means to intentionally distribute these agents. Although the many possibilities for foodborne bioterrorism cannot be specifically prevented, strategic preparations for surveillance, diagnosis, outbreak investigation, and medical response could mitigate foodborne threats of any origin. To examine issues critical to the protection of the nation's food supply, the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a public workshop on October 25 and 26, 2005, in Washington, D.C. The presentations and discussions of the workshop were structured to explore the existing knowledge and unanswered questions indicated by (but not limited to) the following topics: The globalization of the U.S. food supply; The spectrum of microbial threats to food; Case studies of food threats; The organization of food safety systems; Costs and benefits of reporting foodborne threats: the case of bovine spongiform encelphalopathy (BSE); Surveillance for foodborne illness."--Excerpted from Preface
Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Software Tool: Phase II: Prototype of a Decision-Support System by Institute of Medicine (U.S.)( )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

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Improving Access to Essential Medicines for Mental, Neurological, and Substance Use Disorders in Sub-Saharan Africa : workshop summary by National Research Council (U.S.)( )

3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 2011 the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health initiative identified priorities that have the potential to make a significant impact on the lives of people with mental, neurological, and substance use disorders. Reduction of the cost and improvement of the supply of effective medicines was highlighted as one of the top five challenges. For low- and middle-income countries, improving access to appropriate essential medicines can be a tremendous challenge and a critical barrier to scaling up quality care for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders. Reduction of cost and improvement of the supply of effective medicines has the potential to significantly impact the lives of patients with these disorders. Improving Access to Essential Medicines for Mental, Neurological, and Substance Use Disorders in Sub-Saharan Africa is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine Neuroscience Forum in January 2014 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia to discuss opportunities for achieving long-term affordable access to medicines for these disorders. This report examines challenges and opportunities for improving access to essential medicines in four critical areas: demand, selection, supply chains, and financing and pricing. The report also discusses successful activities that increase access to essential medicines both within Sub-Saharan Africa and in other developing countries, and considers the role of governments, nongovernmental organizations, and private groups in procurement of essential medicines for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders."--Publisher's description
 
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Globalization, biosecurity, and the future of the life sciences
Alternative Names

controlled identityNational Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.). Board on Global Health

BGH

Board on Global Health

Board on Global Health, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies

Committee for the Evaluation of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Implementation (Washington, D. C.)

Conseil sur la santé mondiale

Institut de médecine (États-Unis). Conseil sur la santé mondiale

Institute of Medicine. Board on Children, Youth, and Families

Institute of Medicine. Board on Global Health

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (U.S.). Board on Global Health

Institute of Medicine (Spojené státy americké) Board on Global Health

Institute of Medicine (Spojené státy americké). Committee on the Prevention of HIV Infection Among Injecting Drug Users in High-Risk Countries. Board on Global Health

Institute of Medicine (U.S.) Board on Global Health

Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Conseil sur la santé mondiale

IOM. Board on Global Health

IOM. Conseil sur la santé mondiale

Languages
English (81)

Covers
Learning from SARS : preparing for the next disease outbreak : workshop summaryEmerging infectious diseases from the global to the local perspective : a summary of a workshop of the Forum on Emerging InfectionsThe impact of globalization on infectious disease emergence and control : exploring the consequences and opportunities : workshop summaryAntibiotic resistance : implications for global health and novel intervention strategies : workshop summaryViolence prevention in low and middle income countries : finding a place on the global agenda : workshop summaryDesign considerations for evaluating the impact of PEPFAR : workshop summaryMitigating the nutritional impacts of the global food price crisis : workshop summaryAchieving sustainable global capacity for surveillance and response to emerging diseases of zoonotic origin : workshop report