WorldCat Identities

Morris, Adele Cecile 1963-

Overview
Works: 15 works in 25 publications in 2 languages and 252 library holdings
Roles: Editor, Author
Classifications: HJ5321, 363.7387460973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Adele Cecile Morris
Implementing a US carbon tax : challenges and debates by Ian W. H Parry( Book )

8 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 227 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although the future extent and effects of global climate change remain uncertain, the expected damages are not zero, and risks of serious environmental and macroeconomic consequences rise with increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Despite the uncertainties, reducing emissions now makes sense, and a carbon tax is the simplest, most effective, and least costly way to do this. At the same time, a carbon tax would provide substantial new revenues which may be badly needed, given historically high debt-to-GDP levels, pressures on social security and medical budgets, and calls to reform taxes on personal and corporate income. This book is about the practicalities of introducing a carbon tax, set against the broader fiscal context. It consists of thirteen chapters, written by leading experts, covering the full range of issues policymakers would need to understand, such as the revenue potential of a carbon tax, how the tax can be administered, the advantages of carbon taxes over other mitigation instruments and the environmental and macroeconomic impacts of the tax. A carbon tax can work in the United States. This volume shows how, by laying out sound design principles, opportunities for broader policy reforms, and feasible solutions to specific implementation challenges.--
Comparing climate commitments : a model-based analysis of the Copenhagen Accord by Warwick J McKibbin( )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper provides a comparison by analyzing the Copenhagen targets using the GCubed model of the global economy. We begin by formulating a no-policy baseline projection for major world economies. We then model the Copenhagen Accord's economy-wide commitments, with a focus on fossil-fuel-related CO2. We show how different formulations make the same targets appear quite different in stringency, and we estimate and compare the likely economic and environmental performance of major emitters' Copenhagen targets. The analysis also explores the spillover effects of emission reductions efforts on countries that did not adopt economy-wide emissions targets at Copenhagen. We emphasize that this work is not a policy analysis or a prediction about how countries will actually achieve their commitments. Rather, it offers a way of standardizing and comparing heterogeneous proposals with an eye towards assessing their relative environmental and economic consequences
Subsidizing energy efficient household capital : how does it compare to a carbon tax? by Warwick J McKibbin( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Current U.S. law offers a variety of tax credits for different kinds of energy efficient household capital. This study uses an intertemporal general equilibrium model to compare the environmental and economic performance of two policies: (1) a tax credit of 10 percent of the price of household capital that is 20 percent more energy efficient than its unsubsidized counterpart, assuming half of new household investment qualifies for the credit; and (2) a tax starting at 30 [dollars] (2007 [dollars]) per metric ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) and rising 5 percent (inflation adjusted) each year. By 2040, the carbon tax reduces emissions by 60 percent while the investment tax credit for energy-efficient capital reduces emissions by about 1.5 percent. Under the assumption that other countries do not adopt a price on carbon, we find that although the carbon tax reduces U.S. GDP, it improves the welfare of U.S. households because it reduces the world price of fuels, strengthens U.S. terms of trade, and makes imported goods cheaper. The revenue neutral tax credit reduces welfare but boosts U.S. GDP growth slightly in the first few years. Both policies have similar impacts on the federal budget, but of opposite signs -- abstract (p.2)
LOST SOUL by Adele Cecile Morris( Book )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Quantitative studies in public and agricultural economics by Adele Cecile Morris( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Controlling carbon emissions from U.S. power plants how a tradable performance standard compares to a carbon tax by Warwick J McKibbin( )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Different pollution control policies, even if they achieve the same emissions goal, could have importantly different effects on the composition of the energy sector and economic outcomes. In this paper, we use the G-Cubed1 model of the global economy to compare two basic policy approaches for controlling carbon emissions from power plants: 1) A tradable performance standard 2) A carbon tax. We choose these two approaches because they resemble two key options facing policymakers: continue implementing a performance standard approach under the Clean Air Act or adopt an excise tax on the carbon content of fossil fuels instead. Our goal is to highlight the important high-level differences in these basic approaches, abstracting from the details of specific policy proposals. We explore a wide variety of the illustrative policies' economic outcomes including: changes in capital stocks and electricity production across eight types of generators, changes in end-user electricity prices, changes in gross domestic product (GDP), overall welfare impacts on the household sector and, finally, one outcome represented in the G-Cubed model and few others: short to medium-run changes in aggregate employment
Equity and efficiency in cap-and-trade : effectively managing the emissions allowance supply by Adele Cecile Morris( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper considers the distributional effects of cap-and-trade across different sets of people, including consumers, shareholders, household income groups, and geographic regions, and it explores the role of policy design in determining those effects. The paper describes how the incidence of the program depends on how market forces transmit the costs of emissions abatement through the economy and how the program can create large transfers from one group to another, especially through the way the government doles out allowances. Finally, it explains how the allocation of allowances can lower or raise the overall costs to the economy by reducing other economic distortions or by inducing higher-cost abatement. -- Intro (p.1)
Expecting the unexpected : macroeconomic volatility and climate policy by Warwick J McKibbin( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bridging the gap integrating price mechanisms into international climate negotiations by Warwick J McKibbin( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Convexity of Bézier curves and surfaces by Adele Cecile Morris( )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Recepty dla środowiska( )

1 edition published in 2010 in Polish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A climate diplomacy proposal carbon pricing consultations by Adele Cecile Morris( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Consequences of alternative US cap-and-trade policies : controlling both emissions and costs( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

China's carbon future : a model-based analysis by Warwick J McKibbin( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

China took the lead as the world's largest CO2 emitter in 2007. Over the last decade, it has adopted measures to lower the energy and carbon intensity of its economy, This paper models the policies China could adopt to achieve its energy-related INDC commitments with an eye to understanding how the policies could affect both the Chinese and global economies. We use an updated version of the G-Cubed model, a global intertemporal computable general equilibrium (CGE) model, to explore the possible effects of emissions control policies on the Chinese macroeconomy, individual industrial sectors in China, and other outcomes, such as trade flows, currency values, emissions levels, and economic activity. The major innovation in the version of the G-Cubed model used in this paper is a significant disaggregation of electricity generation technologies with a focus on non-fossil fuel technologies
The economic consequences of delay in US climate policy by Warwick J McKibbin( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Morris, Adele 1963-

Morris, Adele C.

Languages
English (24)

Polish (1)