WorldCat Identities

Tennessee Governor (1796-1801 : Sevier)

Overview
Works: 36 works in 38 publications in 1 language and 271 library holdings
Genres: Sources  History  Treaties  Claims 
Classifications: J87, 353.97680352
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Tennessee Publications about Tennessee
Publications by Tennessee Publications by Tennessee
Most widely held works by Tennessee
Messages of the Governors of Tennessee by Tennessee ( Book )
in English and held by 170 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Commission book, 1796-1801 by Tennessee ( Book )
1 edition published in 1957 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Executive journal of Gov. John Sevier by Tennessee ( )
in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
[Letter] 1799 Jun. 24, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] Cap[tain] Edm[un]d Butler by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1799 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This is a letter written by Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) to introduce Reverend Lyman Potter to Captain EdmundButler. Sevier explains that Mr. Potter has business in the Cherokee Nation to discuss with Captain Butler
[Letter] 1799 June 24, [to] the warriors & chiefs of the Cherokee Nation by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1799 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This document is a letter written to the Warriors and Chiefs of the Cherokee Nation by Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) on June 24, 1799. In the letter, Sevier tells the Cherokees thatReverend Lyman Potter has offered his services to teach education, religion, and the fine arts to their people. Sevier praises Potter and gives hisrecommendation to the Cherokee of Potter's qualifications
[Letter] 1797 Nov. 19, Knoxville, [Tennessee to] Andrew Jackson by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1797 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This is a letter written to Andrew Jackson, with copies also sent to U.S. Congressmen from Tennessee, Joseph Anderson and William C.C. Claiborne, by Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) on November 19, 1797. Sevier describes the events surrounding the murder of two Indians and says that the Indian people of the area are distressed over the murders but promise that no retaliation will occur. He explains that some settlers have since moved off of the Indian land, while others remain and refuse to leave. Sevier asks Jackson for his support in assisting the distressed settlers who live within the Indian boundar
[Letter] 1797 Jan. 12, Knoxville, [Tennessee], [to] warriors and Chiefs of the Cherokee Nation by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1797 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter addressed to the warriors and chiefs of the Cherokee Nation, written by Governor John Sevier of Tennessee (1796-1801) and dated January 12, 1797. The letter was given to Cherokee agent Silas Dinsmore to be read aloud to the Cherokee. In his letter, Sevier accused some Cherokees of stealing horses and plundering wagons that had passed through the Cumberland road. Sevier laid the blame on "foolish young people" within the Cherokee Nation but hoped the chiefs and warriors were not encouraging such acts. Sevier urged the Cherokee leaders to work with Dinsmore in getting the stolen property returned. Sevier also expressed condolences for the murder of an Indian and stated that he doubted any of his people would do such a thing. The letter was initially ended on a note of warning to the Cherokee, as Sevier insinuated that if they continued their aggressive behavior, war would be option. However, the last two sections of the original letter were deleted from the final text
[Letter] 1797 Feb. 17, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] Captains Sparks & Wade by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1797 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter written by Governor John Sevier to Captains Sparks and Wade, dated February 17, 1797. Sevier wrote this letter in regards to a conference the captains were preparing to hold withthe settlers living within Indian lands. Sevier pleaded with Sparks and Wade to show compassion and tenderness towards those people, for they would soon be forced to relocate
[Letter] 1797 Jan. 17, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] Sec[retar]y of the Department of War by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1797 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter written by Governor John Sevier of Tennessee (1796-1801) to Secretary of War James McHenry, dated January 17, 1797. Sevier reported that the companies of Captains Wade and Sparks had arrived, but were incomplete. He requested three companies of infantry and a troop of cavalry be sent as well in order to protect the frontier settlers and scare the Indians. Sevier also informed McHenry that several families had their horses stolen and wagons plundered along the Cumberland road, and he had written to Cherokee chiefs and their agent to prevent such acts. Sevier ended his letter by claiming that he would endeavor to prevent encroachments upon the hunting grounds of the Indians
[Letter] 1798 July 15, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] Hon[ora]ble John Steele by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1798 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter from Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) to John Steele, written on July 15, 1798. Sevier states that the treaty with the Cherokees has failed and that some of the statecommissioners would not be returning for the next treaty meeting. Sevier asks Steele to appoint one or two commissioners from the state to take their place, specifically asking for General James Robertson to be one of the commissioners
[Letter] 1797 Feb. 10, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] the warriors and chiefs of the Cherokee Nation by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1797 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter dated February 10, 1797, addressed to the warriors and chiefs of the Cherokee Nation by Governor John Sevier of Tennessee (1796-1801). Sevier sent his apologies for the recent violence that had been committed against several of the Cherokees. He also criticized the chiefs for not making any complaints about these actions, for it impeded the process of apprehending the perpetrators. Sevier stated that although the murders of two Cherokees were committed in Kentucky, the murderers were from Tennessee. Sevier, however, changed his tone when he began to speak of crimes committed against White people by Cherokees. He warned them that if such actions did not cease, it would bring about a war, which would have disastrous consequences for the Cherokee Nation
[Letter] 1798 Sept. 16, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] the Hon[ora]ble James Robertson, Lachlen [i.e. Lachlan] McIntosh, and James White by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1798 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document was written by Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) to James Robertson, Lachlan McIntosh and James White, dated September 16, 1798. This letter was written to inform the three men that the Cherokee are preparing to enter into a treaty with the UnitedStates commissioners. Sevier instructed the men to attend the treaty meeting and represent the interests of the state of Tennessee, particularly in regards to the settlers who have been removed from their plantations because they resided within Indian land boundaries
[Letter] 1797 Mar. 30, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] Silas Dinsmore by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1797 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter written by Tennessee Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) to Cherokee agent Silas Dinsmore, dated March 30, 1797. In the letter, Sevier demanded that the Cherokee chiefs do their best to apprehend and punish those from amongst their nation who were responsible for the murders of several citizens of Tennessee. He also assured Dinsmore that it is his intention to punish any white men who committed violence against the Cherokee Nation. Sevier requested that Dinsmore read aloud to the Chiefs of the nation a letter enclosed with this one and to assure them that the state of Tennessee only desired to be at peace with them
[Letter] 1798 July 4, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] Alfred Moore, George Walton, and John Steele by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1798 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter written by Tennessee governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809), dated July 4, 1798, to Alfred Moore, George Walton, and John Steele. Moore, Walton, and Steele were United States commissioners responsible for forming a treaty between the US and the Cherokee Indians. In the letter, Sevier informed the men that James Robertson, James Stuart, and Major Lachlan McIntosh had been appointed as agents to represent the interests of the state of Tennessee in the insuing treaty. Sevier stated that the state agents would do all that is in their power to aid the commissioners in extinguishing the Cherokee claims. Sevier explained that state agents were necessary because of their connections with the region at hand, and thus, they could better represent the interests of the people there and could prove advantageous to the negotiations
[Letter] 1800 Feb. 25, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] the Hon[ora]ble W[illia]m Cocke, Joseph Anderson & W[illia]m C. Claiborne by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1800 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter from Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) to Joseph Anderson, William Cocke, and William C. Claiborne, dated February 26, 1800. This letter is about William AugustusBowles and his influence over the Creek Nation. Sevier is telling the men to be prepared for what is to come, which could quite possibly be a war. Sevier stated that the state of Tennessee is particularly vulnerable to hostilities and violence
[Letter] 1797 Apr. 26, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] Benj[amin] Hawkins by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1797 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter written by Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) to Benjamin Hawkins, agent and superintendent to the Creek Nation, dated April 26, 1797. Sevier wrote the letter on behalf of a woman by the name of Lillean Williams, who was taken prisoner by Creeks several years ago. While under Creek supervision, Williams had given birth to a daughter, and since the girl was born in the Creek Nation, she was not released with her mother. Sevier requested that Hawkins make enquiries regarding the whereabouts and possible release of the girl, who was then eight years old
[Letter] 1797 June 8, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] warriors & cheifs [sic] of the Cherokee Nation by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1797 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter written on June 8, 1797, to the warriors and chiefs of the Cherokee Nation by John Sevier, governor of Tennessee from 1796-1801 and 1803-1809. In the letter, Sevier explains that there has been talk of a war between the United States and England. He says that England will try to get the Cherokee warriors to fightagainst the Americans, and warns the chiefs not to let their young men andwarriors listen to this talk and remain loyal to the United States
[Letter] 1797 Mar. 5, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] John Watts and other chiefs of the Cherokee Nation by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1797 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter, dated March 5, 1797, written by Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) and addressed to John Watts and other chiefs of the Cherokee Nation. The letter was written in response to a letter by the Cherokee chiefs regarding earlier communications sent by Sevier. In this letter, Sevier negated the claims of Watts and others that the Cherokees have not caused damage to the persons or properties of white settlers. Sevier cited instances in which white settlers were killed in retaliation for the murders of Chief Red Bird and his attendant. Sevier also criticized the Cherokee Nation for not making an official complaint regarding those murders. Furthermore, he denied Watts' claim that his preceding communications were threatening in nature, as he stated that he was merely hoping to convince the Cherokees of the dangers of going to war. Sevier contended that he wished to establish and promote a peace between the United States and the Cherokee Nation
[Letter] 1798 July 11, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] Colo[nel] Henly by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1798 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter written to Colonel Henly by John Sevier, Governor of Tennessee from 1796-1801 and 1803-1809, on July 11, 1798. In the letter, John Sevier states that James Calbert, from theChickasaw Nation has complaints against the United States. Sevier encourages Colonel Henly to listen to the complaints of Calbert and the Chickasaw Nation because of their loyalty and friendship to the United States
[Letter] 1797 Jan. 12, Knoxville, [to] Silas Dinsmore by Tennessee ( )
1 edition published in 1797 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter, dated January 12, 1797, written to Silas Dinsmore, agent to the Cherokee, from Governor John Sevier of Tennessee (1796-1801). The letter was written partly in response to inquiries made earlier by Dinsmore regarding Indian land boundaries in the Cumberland area. Sevier explained that Americans could begin settling in areas as low as the Tennessee River and that the settlements boundary line the government was experimenting with was going to be extended. Sevier devoted the second half of the letter to discussing problems between the white settlers and the Cherokee, by stating that several complaints had been made about robberies and plundering believed to have been committed by some Cherokees. Sevier expressed disdain toward this conduct and feared it would hinder peace. Sevier also enclosed a letter he had written to Cherokee chiefs
 
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English (26)