WorldCat Identities

Georgia Governor (1823-1827 : Troup)

Overview
Works: 65 works in 67 publications in 1 language and 104 library holdings
Genres: Treaties  Sources  History 
Classifications: KF4910,
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Georgia Publications about Georgia
Publications by Georgia Publications by Georgia
Most widely held works about Georgia
 
Most widely held works by Georgia
Georgia and the general government ( Book )
1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Message from the President of the United States, transmitting a letter from the Governor of Georgia, with accompanying documents by Georgia ( Book )
1 edition published in 1827 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
[Communication] 1823 Nov. 15, Executive Department, Milledgeville, Georgia [to the Georgia legislature?] by Georgia ( )
1 edition published in 1823 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Communication dated November 15, 1823 from Georgia Governor George M. Troup (1823-1827) to the Georgia legislature pertaining to a legislative act of the state passed on December 23, 1822. This act allows for the sale of territory, in the form of land lots, recently belonging to the Creeks and Cherokees. Troup asks the legislature to clarify its intentions concerning the administration of this act, particularly in regard to fees allowed
Letter, 1825 July 11, Fort Troup, Fayette County, [Georgia] to George M. Troup, [Governor of Georgia], Milledgeville, G[eorgi]a by Alexander Ware ( )
1 edition published in 1825 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Letter dated July 11, 1825 from General Alexander Ware to Georgia Governor George M. Troup (1823-1827) wherein Ware reports that white settlers in the area of Fayette County are encroaching on Indian lands and committing depredations. In particular, Ware claims that the settlers are stealing the property of the late Creek leader, General William McIntosh, and other "friendly" Indians. He has also received reports indicating that the citizens of DeKalb County are committing depredations against the Indians (probably Creeks) at the head of the Tallapoosa River. Ware urges Troup to put a stop to these activities
[Letter] 1826 Apr. 22, Washington, [D.C. to George] Troup, Governor [of Georgia] by John MacPherson Berrien ( )
1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This letter from John Macpherson Berrien, U.S. Senator from Georgia, to George Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827), is dated April 22, 1826. Berrien reports to Troup on the Senate's proclamation of the Treaty of Washington, D.C. with the Creek Indians (signed January 24, 1826), which nullified the Treaty of Indian Springs (February 12, 1825). Berrien indicates his dissatisfaction with the nullification of the Indian Springs treaty, which had ceded all remaining Creek lands in Georgia, and asserts that it was unnecessary to void the treaty. He complains that the new treaty does not contain sufficient provisions for the McIntosh party (those Creeks associated with William McIntosh, who was executed for having signed the Indian Springs treaty) nor inducements for emigration. This letter is related to tcc685, tcc687, tcc688, and tcc689
[Letter] 1827 Mar. 12, Florida Line, to George M. Troup, Gov[ernor of Georgia], Milledgeville, G[eorgi]a by Thomas Spalding ( )
1 edition published in 1827 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This is a letter dated March 12, 1827 from Thomas Spalding, a commissioner involved in drawing the boundary line between Georgia and Florida, to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827). Spalding describes the great difficulty of surveying the swampy land along the boundary. He also mentions a book by Mr. Ellicott that describes the boundary line and Georgia's geography in general, and he says that the new line is parallel to the old one but falls to the north of it meaning that Georgia will lose some territory that has already been granted. He suggests that the U.S. Congress should in some way confirm the titles of land granted to people in Florida. He says that this is especially necessary since it was a U.S. treaty with the Indians (probably the Creeks) that extended the Georgia line down to Florida in the first place
Letter, 1825 Apr. 12, Lock, chau Talo-fau or Acre Town [to] Geo[rge] M. Troup, [Governor of Georgia], Milledgeville, Georgia by William McIntosh ( )
1 edition published in 1825 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Letter dated April 12, 1825 from Creek leader General William McIntosh to Georgia Governor (and McIntosh's cousin) George M. Troup. In reply to Troup's correspondence, McIntosh gives his consent to survey and run the boundary line between the United States and Creek Nation according to the recent Treaty of Indian Springs, 1825. McIntosh discusses the potential for hostility from Creeks opposed to the treaty and voices his confidence in Troup and the federal government to defend and protect the treaty signers. He mentions difficulties with John Crowell (federal agent to the Creeks), arrangements for further property sales, and his intention to go see the territory west of the Mississippi River. The Creek leader Little Prince notifies McIntosh of an upcoming meeting in Broken Arrow. McIntosh was killed on April 30, 1825 by Creeks opposed to the treaty
[Letter] 1826 June 15, Sand Hills, [Georgia] by John Forsyth ( )
1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Letter dated June 15, 1826 from John Forsyth, U.S. Representative from Georgia, to an unknown recipient (possibly George Troup, Governor of Georgia 1823-1827). Forsyth describes events in the U.S. Congress pertaining to an unnamed treaty (probably the Treaty of Indian Springs, signed with Creek Indians on February 12, 1825) and, more particularly, the passage of legislation to modify said treaty. Forsyth explains his ignorance of certain machinations within the legislature and laments the far reaching effects of this reversal, particularly with respect to the state of Georgia
[Letter] 1826 May 5, Morgan C[oun]ty, G[eorgi]a [to] Geo[rge] M. Troup, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville, Georgia by Wilson Lumpkin ( )
1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This letter from Wilson Lumpkin, survey commissioner and future Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia, (1823-1827), concerns plans for a "Grand Central Canal" linking the Atlantic Ocean with the Chattahoochee River, by way of either the Ocmulgee River or the Oconee River. Lumpkin says that he is confident that the plan is feasible, based on information that he has received from Cherokees in the area. He also indicates that the Cherokees with whom he has spoken have promised to aid him in his survey. The letter is dated May 5, 1826
Richard Thompson land grant by Georgia ( )
1 edition published in 1820 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The collection consists of a land grant, signed by Governor George M. Troup, for lot number 260 of Irwin County was issued to Richard Thompson of Dickson's Battalion, Jackson County, Georgia. Included is a plat of the 490 acres, surveyor's notation of 11 May 1820, and various countersignatures
[Letter] 1826 May 7, Washington, [D.C. to George] Troup, Gov[ernor of Georgia] by John MacPherson Berrien ( )
1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This letter is from John Macpherson Berrien, U.S. Senator from Georgia, to George Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827), dated May 7, 1826. Berrien reports to Troup on the proceedings of the Senate with respect to the ratification and proclamation of the Treaty of Washington, D.C. with the Creeks, and the rejection of various amendments he had proposed. Berrien indicates that he was successful in securing a bill to refer the issue of Creek emigration to the Committee on Indian Affairs, which promptly appointed Colonel David Brearly to superintend the process. He further states that some of McIntosh's delegation are being detained in Washington. This letter is also related to tcc685, tcc686, tcc687, and tcc689
[Letter] 1827 Jan. 13, Jackson County, [Georgia to] G[eorge] M. Troup, [Governor of Georgia], Milledgeville, Georgia by Tandy Key ( )
1 edition published in 1827 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This letter dated January 13, 1827 is from Tandy Key, the former commander of the 26th Regiment of the Georgia Militia, to Governor George M. Troup of Georgia (1823-1827). Key describes an executive order passed in 1813, while he was still a commander, which provided for forts to be established in adjoining counties that were considered frontier areas and thus vulnerable to what Key calls "Indian aggressions." He asks the governor, on behalf of some of the men who had volunteered to serve at those forts, whether they were required to serve again under a newer law or, as stated in the 1813 order, exempt from further service
Land grants by Georgia ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The collection consists of four Georgia land grants as follows: 1) Thomas Clements drew 202 1/2 acres in Henry County. Signed by Governor G.M. Troup. Dated 1821. Seal appended. 2) Sarah Phillips drew 202 1/2 acres in Houston County. Signed by Governor G.M. Troup. Dated 1821. Seal appended. 3) Thomas Jones drew 40 acres in Cherokee County. Signed by Governor C.J. McDonald. Dated 1832. Seal appended. 4) Henry Swann drew 40 acres in Cherokee County. Signed by Governor C.J. McDonald. Dated 1832. Seal appended
 
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Audience level: 0.93 (from 0.00 for Letter wit ... to 1.00 for The survey ...)
Languages
English (25)