WorldCat Identities

Georgia Governor (1823-1827 : Troup)

Overview
Works: 63 works in 68 publications in 1 language and 117 library holdings
Genres: History  Treaties 
Classifications: E78.G3, 336.73
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works about Georgia
 
Most widely held works by Georgia
Governor's message to the General Assembly of the state of Georgia, at the opening of the annual session, November 7, 1825 : with the documents accompanying the same by Georgia( Book )

2 editions published in 1825 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Georgia and the general government( Book )

1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Message from the President of the United States, to both houses of Congress, at the commencement of the second session of the Twentieth Congress. December 2, 1828 by United States( Book )

1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Richard Thompson land grant by Georgia( )

1 edition published in 1820 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The collection consists of one land grant: signed by Governor George M. Troup, for lot number 260 of Irwin County, issued to Richard Thompson of Dickson's Battalion, Jackson County, Georgia. Included is a plat of the 490 acres, surveyor's notation of May 11, 1820, and various countersignatures
[Letter] 1824 Nov. 27, Fort Hawkins, [Georgia to] G[eorge] M. Troup, [Governor of Georgia], Milledgeville, [Georgia] by Duncan Green Campbell( )

1 edition published in 1824 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Letter dated November 26, 1824 from Duncan G. Campbell to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827). Campbell, a commissioner appointed to treat with the Creek Indians, writes to inform Troup that he has arrived at Fort Hawkins (Bibb County, Georgia), the location designated for the negotiation of a treaty with the Creeks on December 1. Campbell requests copies of communications between Troup and the President, Troup and the Cherokees, and Troup and the state legislature regarding the anticipated treaty which ultimately would be ratified on February 12, 1825
[Letter] 1827 Jan. 13, Jackson County, [Georgia to] G[eorge] M. Troup, [Governor of Georgia], Milledgeville, Georgia by Tandy Key( )

1 edition published in 1827 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This letter dated January 13, 1827 is from Tandy Key, the former commander of the 26th Regiment of the Georgia Militia, to Governor George M. Troup of Georgia (1823-1827). Key describes an executive order passed in 1813, while he was still a commander, which provided for forts to be established in adjoining counties that were considered frontier areas and thus vulnerable to what Key calls "Indian aggressions." He asks the governor, on behalf of some of the men who had volunteered to serve at those forts, whether they were required to serve again under a newer law or, as stated in the 1813 order, exempt from further service
[Letter] 1826 Jan. 13, Houston [County to] G[eorge] M. Troup, [Governor of Georgia], Milledgeville, Geo[rgia] by Moses Yarborough( )

1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Letter dated January 13, 1826 from Moses Yarborough to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827) regarding the rental of land originally set aside as reservations for unnamed Indians. Yarborough refers to a previous letter also sent to Troup on this matter. The letter referred to may be tcc484
[Copy of] communication, 1823 Nov. 15, Milledgeville, Georgia [to the State] House [of] Repres[entatives] by Georgia( )

1 edition published in 1823 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document is a handwritten copy of a communication from George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827), to the House of Representatives of the state of Georgia informing them that no provision was made for the compensation of commissioners appointed to attend recent treaties with the Creek and Cherokee Indians. Troup indicates that such an oversight leaves room for Executive indiscretion regarding compensation for said services and the Legislature should always establish a pay rate for any persons appointed for state duty. Another copy prepared for the state Senate appears in tcc487
[Communication] 1823 Nov. 15, Executive Department, Milledgeville, Georgia [to the Georgia legislature?] by Georgia( )

1 edition published in 1823 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Communication dated November 15, 1823 from Georgia Governor George M. Troup (1823-1827) to the Georgia legislature pertaining to a legislative act of the state passed on December 23, 1822. This act allows for the sale of territory, in the form of land lots, recently belonging to the Creeks and Cherokees. Troup asks the legislature to clarify its intentions concerning the administration of this act, particularly in regard to fees allowed
[Letter] 1826 May 5, Morgan C[oun]ty, G[eorgi]a [to] Geo[rge] M. Troup, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville, Georgia by Wilson Lumpkin( )

1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This letter from Wilson Lumpkin, survey commissioner and future Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia, (1823-1827), concerns plans for a "Grand Central Canal" linking the Atlantic Ocean with the Chattahoochee River, by way of either the Ocmulgee River or the Oconee River. Lumpkin says that he is confident that the plan is feasible, based on information that he has received from Cherokees in the area. He also indicates that the Cherokees with whom he has spoken have promised to aid him in his survey. The letter is dated May 5, 1826
[Letter] 1825 Dec. 22, Mobile [to] his Excellency [Governor of Georgia] George [Troup] by E Lewis( )

1 edition published in 1825 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document is a letter, dated December 22, 1825, from E. Lewis, in Mobile, Alabama to Georgia Governor George [Troup] regarding the alleged lawless conduct and character of John Crowell, an Indian agent to the Creeks (1821-1825?). Lewis's comments generally relate to Crowell's involvement in land dealings and local judicial proceedings
[Letter] 1826 Apr. 22, Washington, [D.C. to George] Troup, Governor [of Georgia] by John MacPherson Berrien( )

1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This letter from John Macpherson Berrien, U.S. Senator from Georgia, to George Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827), is dated April 22, 1826. Berrien reports to Troup on the Senate's proclamation of the Treaty of Washington, D.C. with the Creek Indians (signed January 24, 1826), which nullified the Treaty of Indian Springs (February 12, 1825). Berrien indicates his dissatisfaction with the nullification of the Indian Springs treaty, which had ceded all remaining Creek lands in Georgia, and asserts that it was unnecessary to void the treaty. He complains that the new treaty does not contain sufficient provisions for the McIntosh party (those Creeks associated with William McIntosh, who was executed for having signed the Indian Springs treaty) nor inducements for emigration. This letter is related to tcc685, tcc687, tcc688, and tcc689
Letter, 1825 Feb. 9, Indian Springs [to] G[eorge] M. Troup, [Governor of Georgia] by Duncan Green Campbell( )

1 edition published in 1825 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter from Duncan G. Campbell and James Meriwether, commissioners appointed to treat with the Creek Nation, to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827), dated February 9, 1825. Campbell and Meriwether thank Troup for transmitting a copy of a recent message delivered by the President to the U.S. Senate. The two commissioners are at Indian Springs preparing to negotiate a treaty with the Creeks and they indicate to Troup that large numbers of chiefs are gathering at the treaty ground, including a "hostile" band from the Tuckabatchee (also Tuckabatchie, Tuckabatchi) towns (in present day Elmore County, Alabama
[Letter] 1827 Mar. 12, Florida Line, to George M. Troup, Gov[ernor of Georgia], Milledgeville, G[eorgi]a by Thomas Spalding( )

1 edition published in 1827 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter dated March 12, 1827 from Thomas Spalding, a commissioner involved in drawing the boundary line between Georgia and Florida, to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827). Spalding describes the great difficulty of surveying the swampy land along the boundary. He also mentions a book by Mr. Ellicott that describes the boundary line and Georgia's geography in general, and he says that the new line is parallel to the old one but falls to the north of it meaning that Georgia will lose some territory that has already been granted. He suggests that the U.S. Congress should in some way confirm the titles of land granted to people in Florida. He says that this is especially necessary since it was a U.S. treaty with the Indians (probably the Creeks) that extended the Georgia line down to Florida in the first place
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.69 (from 0.54 for [Communica ... to 1.00 for Biography ...)

Languages
English (28)