WorldCat Identities

Georgia Governor (1823-1827 : Troup)

Overview
Works: 60 works in 67 publications in 1 language and 116 library holdings
Genres: History  Sources  Treaties 
Classifications: E78.G3, 336.73
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Georgia
 
Most widely held works by Georgia
Governor's message to the General Assembly of the state of Georgia, at the opening of the annual session, November 7, 1825 : with the documents accompanying the same by Georgia( Book )

2 editions published in 1825 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Georgia and the general government( Book )

1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Message from the President of the United States, to both houses of Congress, at the commencement of the second session of the Twentieth Congress. December 2, 1828 by United States( Book )

1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Land grants by Georgia( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The collection consists of four Georgia land grants as follows: 1) Thomas Clements drew 202 1/2 acres in Henry County. Signed by Governor G.M. Troup. Dated 1821. Seal appended. 2) Sarah Phillips drew 202 1/2 acres in Houston County. Signed by Governor G.M. Troup. Dated 1821. Seal appended. 3) Thomas Jones drew 40 acres in Cherokee County. Signed by Governor C.J. McDonald. Dated 1832. Seal appended. 4) Henry Swann drew 40 acres in Cherokee County. Signed by Governor C.J. McDonald. Dated 1832. Seal appended
[Letter] 1827 Mar. 12, Florida Line, to George M. Troup, Gov[ernor of Georgia], Milledgeville, G[eorgi]a by Thomas Spalding( )

2 editions published in 1827 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter dated May 8, 1827 from Thomas Spalding, a Georgia commissioner involved in running the boundary line between Georgia and Florida, to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827), reporting that the temporary boundary line has been finished and detailing his examination of the St. Mary's River. Spalding concludes that the true source of the river is not accurately represented by the surveys of Mr. Ellicot. He presents evidence, including references to ancient Indian paths, to counterdict Ellicot's reports and alleges that Ellicot never fully explored the source of the river and subsequently, surveyors have perpetuated his errors. Spalding asks the governor to consider his findings before the legislature approves a permanent boundary line
[Letter] 1826 May 18, Washington, [D.C. to George] Troup, Gov[ernor of Georgia] by John MacPherson Berrien( )

4 editions published in 1826 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter dated May 18, 1826 from John Macpherson Berrien, U.S. Senator from Georgia, to George Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827), regarding the continued deliberations of Congress on the Treaty of Washington, D.C. with the Creeks. Berrien reports that when the appropriations bill associated with the treaty came under consideration, it was discovered that a "corrupt" agreement had been made to deliver the majority of the funds to the McIntosh delegation (those Creeks associated with the late William McIntosh). Berrien informs Troup that he is a member of a committee appointed to investigate the matter and laments the continued association of the treaty with fraud and partisanship. This letter is related to tcc685, tcc686, tcc687 and tcc
Letter, 1825 Feb. 9, Indian Springs [to] G[eorge] M. Troup, [Governor of Georgia] by Duncan Green Campbell( )

1 edition published in 1825 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter from Duncan G. Campbell and James Meriwether, commissioners appointed to treat with the Creek Nation, to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827), dated February 9, 1825. Campbell and Meriwether thank Troup for transmitting a copy of a recent message delivered by the President to the U.S. Senate. The two commissioners are at Indian Springs preparing to negotiate a treaty with the Creeks and they indicate to Troup that large numbers of chiefs are gathering at the treaty ground, including a "hostile" band from the Tuckabatchee (also Tuckabatchie, Tuckabatchi) towns (in present day Elmore County, Alabama
Letter, 1825 Apr. 26, to George M. Troup, [Governor of Georgia] by James Barbour( )

1 edition published in 1825 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter from James Barbour, Secretary of War (1825-1828), to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827), dated April 26, 1825. Barbour informs Troup that he has received a copy of Troup's recent proclamation calling for the protection of the Creek Indians subsequent to the Treaty of Indian Springs (February 12, 1825). Barbour further responds to Troup's request that the President appoint federal commissioners to attend the running of the boundary line between the states of Georgia and Alabama. Barbour indicates that the President believes no law exists empowering him to interfere in this matter of sovereign state interests
[Communication] 1823 Nov. 15, Executive Department, Milledgeville, Georgia [to the Georgia legislature?] by Georgia( )

1 edition published in 1823 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Communication dated November 15, 1823 from Georgia Governor George M. Troup (1823-1827) to the Georgia legislature pertaining to a legislative act of the state passed on December 23, 1822. This act allows for the sale of territory, in the form of land lots, recently belonging to the Creeks and Cherokees. Troup asks the legislature to clarify its intentions concerning the administration of this act, particularly in regard to fees allowed
[Letter] 1827 Jan. 13, Jackson County, [Georgia to] G[eorge] M. Troup, [Governor of Georgia], Milledgeville, Georgia by Tandy Key( )

1 edition published in 1827 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This letter dated January 13, 1827 is from Tandy Key, the former commander of the 26th Regiment of the Georgia Militia, to Governor George M. Troup of Georgia (1823-1827). Key describes an executive order passed in 1813, while he was still a commander, which provided for forts to be established in adjoining counties that were considered frontier areas and thus vulnerable to what Key calls "Indian aggressions." He asks the governor, on behalf of some of the men who had volunteered to serve at those forts, whether they were required to serve again under a newer law or, as stated in the 1813 order, exempt from further service
[Copy of] communication, 1823 Nov. 15, Milledgeville, Georgia [to the State] House [of] Repres[entatives] by Georgia( )

1 edition published in 1823 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document is a handwritten copy of a communication from George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia (1823-1827), to the House of Representatives of the state of Georgia informing them that no provision was made for the compensation of commissioners appointed to attend recent treaties with the Creek and Cherokee Indians. Troup indicates that such an oversight leaves room for Executive indiscretion regarding compensation for said services and the Legislature should always establish a pay rate for any persons appointed for state duty. Another copy prepared for the state Senate appears in tcc487
[Letter] 1826 May 5, Morgan C[oun]ty, G[eorgi]a [to] Geo[rge] M. Troup, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville, Georgia by Wilson Lumpkin( )

1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This letter from Wilson Lumpkin, survey commissioner and future Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia, (1823-1827), concerns plans for a "Grand Central Canal" linking the Atlantic Ocean with the Chattahoochee River, by way of either the Ocmulgee River or the Oconee River. Lumpkin says that he is confident that the plan is feasible, based on information that he has received from Cherokees in the area. He also indicates that the Cherokees with whom he has spoken have promised to aid him in his survey. The letter is dated May 5, 1826
 
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Languages
English (30)